How Can I Propagate Wild Saskatoons From Cuttings???

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How Can I Propagate Wild Saskatoons From Cuttings???

Post by Paul & Diane Mart » Wed, 24 Jan 1996 04:00:00



We've about 25 frozen cuttings from wild saskatoons. We're interested
propagating these because this type of shrub is vanishing from our area
and they're harder and harder to find. Is there anybody out there in
***space that can offer us advice? Please respond ASAP.

Thanks,

Paul & Diane

--
I find TV to be very educational. Every time somebody switches it on I go into another room and read a good book.- Groucho Marx

 
 
 

How Can I Propagate Wild Saskatoons From Cuttings???

Post by Beverly Erlebach » Sun, 28 Jan 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>We've about 25 frozen cuttings from wild saskatoons. We're interested
>propagating these because this type of shrub is vanishing from our area
>and they're harder and harder to find. Is there anybody out there in
>***space that can offer us advice? Please respond ASAP.

Try the book "Uncommon Fruits Worthy of Attention" by Lee Reich.
You can probably get your library to get it by interlibrary loan.
Actually, almost any book on propagation of common plants would
cover Amelanchier since several species are commonly used for
ornamental purposes.

I assume you know that there are cultivated selections of saskatoon
available from nurseries, but want to propagate your own favorites,
especially considering your extreme climate.

Btw, some Amelanchier spp spread by suckering.  An easy way to propagate
these plants is to dig up and transplant young suckers, or make root
cuttings.

Hope this helps

Beverly Erlebacher
Toronto, Ontario Canada

 
 
 

How Can I Propagate Wild Saskatoons From Cuttings???

Post by Robert Be » Mon, 29 Jan 1996 04:00:00




Quote:
>We've about 25 frozen cuttings from wild saskatoons. We're interested
>propagating these because this type of shrub is vanishing from our area
>and they're harder and harder to find. Is there anybody out there in
>***space that can offer us advice? Please respond ASAP.

>Thanks,

>Paul & Diane

Hi!

I consulted "The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation" by M. Dirr
and C. Heuser, Jr., and came up with the following:

Amelanchier alnifolia - Saskatoon

Cuttings;  softwood when new growth is several inches long.  3000 ppm
IBA-talc and mist result in good rooting.  Late June (Canada) rooted
better than cuttings taken 2 weeks earlier or semi-hardwood cuttings
taken later.  Hormone had no effect.  A minimum of 3 roots per cutting
was necessary for survival.

A key to rooting this and subsequent species is timing.  The currings
must be soft, taken well before the end bud has set.  For most parts of
the U.S., late May into June would be the pak time.

Root cuttings would probably work on this species.  Use root pieces 1/4"
wide and 2" long.

SEED:  Should not be allowed to dry out, and should be stored in sealed
container at 41 F.  3 months cold stratification or fall planting in
secessary.  The seed coat can become quite leathery and impervious.  If
dried berries (entire fruit) are used, the fruits may need a warm period
(as much as one year) prior to cold stratification.

- - - -

It says nothing about hardwood cuttings which I assume is what you have.  
If you want to try them, the best thing is to use a higher strentgy
rooting hormone with IBA and take current year's wood (cut off any of the
previous year's).  Dip the ends, and stick them deep into the rooting
medium, with just the tips exposed.  Keep cool, moist, and wait till
spring.  I haven't heard of doing much with hardwood cuttings with
anything in the rose family though.  Still, you have the cuttings, can't
hurt to try it.

Root cuttings seem to be your best bet this time of year, if you can
actually get to the roots to take them.  

Good luck!

bob

 
 
 

How Can I Propagate Wild Saskatoons From Cuttings???

Post by Echinace » Mon, 12 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Serviceberries are fairly easy to propagate by transplanting suckers i
have also put fresh green wood cuttings in willow water and gotten some
viable cuttings, but I have no idea if frozen cuttings arew going to be
viable      Jim Foster Montana