Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

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Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

Post by my-last-n.. » Wed, 01 Mar 2000 04:00:00



I've always liked gardenias, but I'm currently cursed with west-only window
exposures.  

I'm trying to get my gardenia to bloom.  I've got some supplemental lights, and
the jury is out as to whether the buds will pop. (I bought it with buds, don't
know if they'd set, much less pop, otherwise).

The supplemental light is on 12 hours a day corresponding with the natural
daylight hours.  I don't go into wattage details since I'm looking for what will
work, as opposed to what I may already have. The plans are close to the window,
and when it isn't cloudy, they get a couple of hours of weak but relatively
direct sunlight.

Does anybody have experience with this?  I'm sort of under the impression that
it's impossible to make these plants bloom without strong direct sunlight.
Anybody managed to do it otherwise?  I've also got a Calamondin orange next to
it, and it probably wants the same amount of light.  (This is New England, so
sunlight is lame to begin with, though I had great luck with these plants in
south windows in the past).

I was looking for higher-end lighting at Home Depot.  They seem to have high
pressure sodium and other bulbs, but I couldn't find any fixtures for them.
Before I even bother looking for more, I wanted advice (and locations of where
to get good lights if you know of them).

Thanks.
D. Tenny

 
 
 

Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

Post by Scott Mcphe » Wed, 08 Mar 2000 04:00:00


First off I would like to say I can't grow Gardenia worth a damn, and have
given up.

Now, the best Gardenia I have ever seen are growing a block away in _VERY_
shady conditions under a roofed hallway that is north facing. The plants are
about 4'x3', and are periodically covered with blooms. They are growing in
half wine barrels.

So, I don't think that it is the light.

Regards,

Scott


Quote:
>I've always liked gardenias, but I'm currently cursed with west-only window
>exposures.

>I'm trying to get my gardenia to bloom.  I've got some supplemental lights,
and
>the jury is out as to whether the buds will pop. (I bought it with buds,
don't
>know if they'd set, much less pop, otherwise).

>The supplemental light is on 12 hours a day corresponding with the natural
>daylight hours.  I don't go into wattage details since I'm looking for what
will
>work, as opposed to what I may already have. The plans are close to the
window,
>and when it isn't cloudy, they get a couple of hours of weak but relatively
>direct sunlight.

>Does anybody have experience with this?  I'm sort of under the impression
that
>it's impossible to make these plants bloom without strong direct sunlight.
>Anybody managed to do it otherwise?  I've also got a Calamondin orange next
to
>it, and it probably wants the same amount of light.  (This is New England,
so
>sunlight is lame to begin with, though I had great luck with these plants
in
>south windows in the past).

>I was looking for higher-end lighting at Home Depot.  They seem to have
high
>pressure sodium and other bulbs, but I couldn't find any fixtures for them.
>Before I even bother looking for more, I wanted advice (and locations of
where
>to get good lights if you know of them).

>Thanks.
>D. Tenny


 
 
 

Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

Post by JEROME MILOSE » Thu, 09 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Scott,

Where in the world is this north facing roofed hallway?
What's the humidity like?

My gardenia is doing poorly, I live 100 miles north of the Big Apple.
It has buds but is losing leaves and some buds are covered by small
dark colored spots that are probably insect eggs. What should I use
to rid the plant of them? This plant was purchased in December from
Home Depot, had buds on it that dropped and then developed new
buds in the beginning of Feb, How long does it usually take for the buds
to open?  Plants are in an east window and also get fluorescent light.

Thanks,    J e r

 
 
 

Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

Post by Scott Mcphe » Fri, 10 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Hi Jerome,

Sorry, I forgot to mention that I am in the Northern California Bay Area.
The climate here is mediterranian, so humidity in the summer is quite low, I
would guess 20-30% in our dry summers.

Maybe those small dark colored spots on your gardenia buds are scale??

Scott


Quote:

>Scott,

>Where in the world is this north facing roofed hallway?
>What's the humidity like?

>My gardenia is doing poorly, I live 100 miles north of the Big Apple.
>It has buds but is losing leaves and some buds are covered by small
>dark colored spots that are probably insect eggs. What should I use
>to rid the plant of them? This plant was purchased in December from
>Home Depot, had buds on it that dropped and then developed new
>buds in the beginning of Feb, How long does it usually take for the buds
>to open?  Plants are in an east window and also get fluorescent light.

>Thanks,    J e r

 
 
 

Artificial lights to force Gardenia bloom in west window

Post by Judy Gieselma » Fri, 10 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Gardenias need a temperature drop at night to bloom.  I placed mine on the floor
very close to a floor to ceiling window on the east.  There was enough of a temp
drop at night (we also turn our thermostat down at night) being very close to the
window glass that it bloomed quite well with no additional light.  You might try
moving it very close to the window.

Judy

Quote:

> I'm trying to get my gardenia to bloom.  I've got some supplemental lights, and
> the jury is out as to whether the buds will pop. (I bought it with buds, don't
> know if they'd set, much less pop, otherwise).

> The supplemental light is on 12 hours a day corresponding with the natural
> daylight hours.  I don't go into wattage details since I'm looking for what will
> work, as opposed to what I may already have. The plans are close to the window,
> and when it isn't cloudy, they get a couple of hours of weak but relatively
> direct sunlight.