peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

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peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

Post by Patty Davi » Mon, 31 May 1999 04:00:00



I have a peach tree...type unknown...came with the house along with
several  different type of apple, japanese plums, asian pears, anjou
pears.  The orchard is probably as old as the house (15 yrs).  The peach
tree is in extreme distress.  It seems to be an alternate bearer,and  is
extremely susceptible to leaf curl.  I have sprayed in the past  (2
seasons) with little success. (maybe because of the size...15-20 feet
tall).
I have a bumper crop of little peaches, but very little leaves to
support them.  Is this peach tree to old to bear?  Has the leaf curl
finally destroyed the tree?  Is there anything I can do at this late
date to save the tree?  Should I cut it down for the continued health of
my other fruit trees?

Thanks you,

Patty

 
 
 

peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

Post by C. A. Owen » Mon, 31 May 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have a peach tree...type unknown...came with the house along with
> several  different type of apple, japanese plums, asian pears, anjou
> pears.  The orchard is probably as old as the house (15 yrs).  The peach
> tree is in extreme distress.  It seems to be an alternate bearer,and  is
> extremely susceptible to leaf curl.  I have sprayed in the past  (2
> seasons) with little success. (maybe because of the size...15-20 feet
> tall).
> I have a bumper crop of little peaches, but very little leaves to
> support them.  Is this peach tree to old to bear?  Has the leaf curl
> finally destroyed the tree?  Is there anything I can do at this late
> date to save the tree?  Should I cut it down for the continued health of
> my other fruit trees?

Peach trees can bear for more than a hundred years.  First, remove all
fruit and blossoms every year until you get the leaf curl under control;
the tree doesn't need the added stress.  Then, agressively treat the
leaf curl.  Dormant spray in winter, and treatment spray all summer
long.  [You can improve your spraying with the use of a step ladder.]
Prune the tree hard this fall.

Chris Owens

Quote:

> Thanks you,

> Patty

 
 
 

peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

Post by Towering » Tue, 01 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

[snip]
>Prune the tree hard this fall.

I/ve been operating under the assumption that peach trees are best pruned about
4 weeks before leaf out.   At this time, pruning wounds heal faster, flower
buds can be easily recognized, and injury from low winter temperature is
avoided.
Maybe it/s different here in the zone 7 / mid-Atlantic.

                                                   TQ

 
 
 

peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

Post by Grdnpea » Tue, 01 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>I have a peach tree...type unknown...came with the house along with
>several  different type of apple, japanese plums, asian pears, anjou
>pears.  The orchard is probably as old as the house (15 yrs).  The peach
>tree is in extreme distress.

Hi Patty,
It looks like you may need to make a call or take a trip to your local
agriculture extension office.  They would be able to identify problems specific
to your area, and possibly identify the varieties of trees.

In the meantime (I'm not recommending this) my neighbors had a tree with a
severe case of peach leaf curl, and picked off every offending leaf.

A spray of wettable sulphur will not cure the leaf curl but will help to keep
it from spreading.  Do the major spraying during the dormancy.

Hope this helps.  

MsPeach
USDA zone 9, Los Altos, California zone 16
To e-mail, remove .mil.org

 
 
 

peach tree in PNW question (lots of questions)

Post by Grdnpea » Sat, 05 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Patty,
When I suggested wettable sulphur for peach trees, I meant to spray now.
Sulphur can be sprayed when the tree has leaves.  

Wait until for the major dormant spraying.
MsPeach
USDA zone 9, Los Altos, California zone 16
To e-mail, remove .mil.org