Girdling always fatal?

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Girdling always fatal?

Post by Mike Prage » Mon, 08 May 2000 04:00:00



The previous owner of our property had strung a wire clothesline
between two deciduous oaks.  I have removed the main line, but the
circle of wire on each tree has already disappeared into the bark, and
I've made no attempt so far to remove it.

The trees now seem healthy, but I'm concerned about preserving them --
they are handsome, 20-year-old specimens.  Will the embedded wire
cause death through girdling as the trees continue to grow?  If so,
should I try to remove the wire?  This will necessarily involve
damaging the bark, and I am concerned that the "cure" may be as bad as
the disease.

Mike Prager
Beaufort, NC (zone 8)

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by Catherin » Mon, 08 May 2000 04:00:00


Girdling is the removal of the bark all around the tree but in
this case, I would think the bark might grow right over the
wire.  If it were my tree, I'd cut the wire in a number of
places so as the trunk expands, the wire wouldn't cut into the
tree but if removing the wire would damage a lot of bark, I'd
just leave it there.


Quote:

>The previous owner of our property had strung a wire clothesline
>between two deciduous oaks.  I have removed the main line, but
the
>circle of wire on each tree has already disappeared into the
bark, and
>I've made no attempt so far to remove it.

>The trees now seem healthy, but I'm concerned about preserving
them --
>they are handsome, 20-year-old specimens.  Will the embedded
wire
>cause death through girdling as the trees continue to grow?  If
so,
>should I try to remove the wire?  This will necessarily involve
>damaging the bark, and I am concerned that the "cure" may be as
bad as
>the disease.

>Mike Prager
>Beaufort, NC (zone 8)

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Girdling always fatal?

Post by BeeCroft » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> If it were my tree, I'd cut the wire in a number of
>places so as the trunk expands, the wire wouldn't cut into the
>tree

I bet 3or 4 cuts with a 4" angle grinder through the wire would help a lot.
Be quick too

Tom

There is an extra Bee in the Email address after the AOL.com

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by Bill Morg » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> The previous owner of our property had strung a wire clothesline
> between two deciduous oaks.  I have removed the main line, but the
> circle of wire on each tree has already disappeared into the bark, and
> I've made no attempt so far to remove it.

If the wire has already disappeared into the bark then:

1) the damage is already done

and

2) it was not sufficient to kill the tree, and the injury is already
healed, or well on the way.

The reason for this is that the wire didn't disappear under the bark all at
once, but rather a little here, a little there over a period of years. By
the time it started in one place, the process was over and healing begun in
others. So there was not a time when the entire circumference was
disrupted, and the tree simply grew around the problem.

You are lucky: the chain of events wouldn't always work that way.

Quote:

> The trees now seem healthy, but I'm concerned about preserving them --
> they are handsome, 20-year-old specimens.  Will the embedded wire
> cause death through girdling as the trees continue to grow?

As indicated above, no.

Quote:
> If so,
> should I try to remove the wire?  This will necessarily involve
> damaging the bark, and I am concerned that the "cure" may be as bad as
> the disease.

This would kill the trees by completely girdling them, so the cure would be
much worse than the disease.

You might want to cut out any sections still showing at the surface, but
definitely don't try to to remove anything already covered with bark.

Regards,
Bill

--

"Those who do not learn the lessons of science fiction are condemned to
live them."  

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by le » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00




Quote:
>> If it were my tree, I'd cut the wire in a number of
>>places so as the trunk expands, the wire wouldn't cut into the
>>tree

>I bet 3or 4 cuts with a 4" angle grinder through the wire would help a
>lot. Be quick too

 unless the bark has already grown over it... then it's best to leave it
alone. it's much worse for the tree to go breaking up the bark digging for
buried wire.
 the previous owner here tied up the sap lines with either wire or
fiberglass string. the trees are growing over the wire, but the trees that
had the fiberglass string are all dead or dying. i'm trying to get all the
remainders of both that aren't grown over cut off the trees this summer.
 it baffles me that someone would wrap wire/string around the very trees
they are expecting to produce sap... i'm retiring the worst of the damaged
trees. it's not worth it to me to stress them further by continuing to tap
them.
lee <learning more about maples than i wanted to<g>)
 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by FLICKER5 » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>> The previous owner of our property had strung a wire clothesline
>> between two deciduous oaks.

Here I have a full-sized red maple, with a chain imbedded in the bark (for
previous owner's hammock !?!).  We could only remove about seven inches of the
chain.  The tree is alive, but. . . . this spring, it is very slow to leaf out.
 Also, there are dozens of little sucker branches growing out of the tree, and
they are all below the chain line.  This gives me some concern, that the tree
is struggling.

  I hope you have better luck with your oaks.

Bianca

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by ozark ba » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00


No it wont harm the tree , the tree will jsut grow over it , it may have
a ridge on the tree where it was though , removeing it would very likely
damage the tree badly though ..
Not more than ten miles from my home , there is aa old model A about
fif*** feet off the ground in a great big old oak tree .. with branches
grown in around and through it ... neat .
Oz

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by Mike Prage » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00


Thanks to everyone who offered advice and comments on my question.  It
appears that the trees have survived the wire, which is already buried
deep in the bark.  I was luck that they did, as they are two beautiful
specimens.  With the FOUR hurricanes that blew through last year,
bringing plenty of salt spray with them, oaks are looking better than
just about anything else, other than perhaps yaupon holly (which IMO
is not that attractive to begin with!)

Mike Prager
Beaufort, NC (zone 8)

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by Ann » Tue, 09 May 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>The trees now seem healthy, but I'm concerned about preserving them --
>they are handsome, 20-year-old specimens.  Will the embedded wire
>cause death through girdling as the trees continue to grow?  If so,
>should I try to remove the wire?  This will necessarily involve
>damaging the bark, and I am concerned that the "cure" may be as bad as
>the disease.

No, the wire won't kill the tree.  I have found amazing metal things
in the various trees we've taken down over the years.  The tree will
absorb the wire completely.  That's why sawmills won't take trees that
have grown in residential yards, too many dangers to their very
expensive sawblades.

--
Ann, Gardening in Zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
********************************
http://www.annzoid.com

 
 
 

Girdling always fatal?

Post by Chris Owen » Thu, 11 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> The previous owner of our property had strung a wire clothesline
> between two deciduous oaks.  I have removed the main line, but the
> circle of wire on each tree has already disappeared into the bark, and
> I've made no attempt so far to remove it.

> The trees now seem healthy, but I'm concerned about preserving them --
> they are handsome, 20-year-old specimens.  Will the embedded wire
> cause death through girdling as the trees continue to grow?  If so,
> should I try to remove the wire?  This will necessarily involve
> damaging the bark, and I am concerned that the "cure" may be as bad as
> the disease.

It sounds as if the bark grew over the wire.  [Trees have the most
amazing ability to heal injuries!]  Whilst this isn't GOOD for the tree
-- and it is certainly something to remember if you ever have to remove
these trees -- they should survive it just fine.  [BTW, if you sell the
house, it would be nice to tell the new owner about the wire in the
trees, too; the problem comes when the tree has to be removed, and
somebody hits the wire with a chainsaw -- really serious injuries can
result.]

Chris Owens