Save the Orchid--It's a Child's Pet

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Save the Orchid--It's a Child's Pet

Post by JOSEPH RIZ » Mon, 24 Jun 1996 04:00:00



  I hope somebody out there can help me with this as I know nothing
about orchids and have not found a book addressing his problem.  My
daughter had a beautiful orchid in her dorm room that seemed to be
doing quite well in those conditions.  My home is kept much colder due
to health reasons and the orchid started dying when she brought it
home. It had two lovely long leaves that began to yellow and turn
***y.  One died off. To save the plant, I removed all of the bad
leaf and clipped the two foot stem down to about a foot and sat it out
on the front porch out of the sun.  It has been raining a lot lately
and the plant has bebounded and is putting out some new little leaves.
Now, I wonder if I ruined the stem by cutting it. It does not look at
all like it is going to form a bud.  I'm wondering should I remove the
stem completely and will a new stem grow or should I wait and give this
one more time. It looks like a dead stick. All info will be
appreciated. Yes, I admit, the child is 18 years old but she does love
her pet orchid...................................................Dee

 
 
 

Save the Orchid--It's a Child's Pet

Post by orch.. » Wed, 26 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>  I hope somebody out there can help me with this as I know nothing
>about orchids and have not found a book addressing his problem.  My
>daughter had a beautiful orchid in her dorm room that seemed to be
>doing quite well in those conditions.  My home is kept much colder due
>to health reasons and the orchid started dying when she brought it
>home. It had two lovely long leaves that began to yellow and turn
>***y.  One died off. To save the plant, I removed all of the bad
>leaf and clipped the two foot stem down to about a foot and sat it out
>on the front porch out of the sun.  It has been raining a lot lately
>and the plant has bebounded and is putting out some new little leaves.
>Now, I wonder if I ruined the stem by cutting it. It does not look at
>all like it is going to form a bud.  I'm wondering should I remove the
>stem completely and will a new stem grow or should I wait and give this
>one more time. It looks like a dead stick. All info will be
>appreciated. Yes, I admit, the child is 18 years old but she does love
>her pet orchid...................................................Dee

There are so many orchids with such different requirements that
without further identification it will be very difficult for anyone to
give useful advice. Can you identify the orchid, or possibly just
describe it better (like how big, what the flower looks like, what the
plant is potted in, anything that might help us identify it) and also
describe both the former growing conditions (temperature, humidity,
light, watering and fertilizing) and the current ones?

Also, you will find a lot of avid orchid growers in the
rec.gardens.orchids group, which is probably where you should post
your query. If you don't have access to that group I will be happy to
forward it for you if you like, and then forward any responses to you.

Harold
Covington, LA, USA

 
 
 

Save the Orchid--It's a Child's Pet

Post by Rick Co » Thu, 27 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Now, I wonder if I ruined the stem by cutting it. It does not look at
>all like it is going to form a bud.  I'm wondering should I remove the
>stem completely and will a new stem grow or should I wait and give this
>one more time. It looks like a dead stick. All info will be
>appreciated. Yes, I admit, the child is 18 years old but she does love
>her pet orchid...................................................Dee

I think you need to get a basic book on orchid culture in the home.
Without knowing what kind of orchid it is, it's hard to know whether you
did anything wrong or not.

One thing, if it is just starting to put out new growth it's hard to tell
if it will bloom this year or not. The flower scapes on most of the popular
species form after the new leaves. If it doesn't it probably has more to do
with the changed conditions than your pruning.

And now the good news. Orchid plants are _tough_. They are hard to kill
short of overwatering or freezing t hem.

--RC