Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

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Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Cindi Jame » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Hi, me again!

I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today has
some powdery mildew on the
leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but will
resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
(Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?

Thanks,

cindi Zone 5 Detroit

--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

"Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
funeral" __Heathers__


  ^v^      
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Bev Carney or Tom Sink » Sun, 12 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Baking soda and water should do the trick.  I don't know the proportions
though.  IT should be sprayed on both sides of the leaves.

Quote:

> Hi, me again!

> I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today has
> some powdery mildew on the
> leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but will
> resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
> antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
> (Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?

> Thanks,

> cindi Zone 5 Detroit

> --
> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
> Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

> "Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
> funeral" __Heathers__


>   ^v^
> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

--
Bev or Tom

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by rmitchel » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


1 teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water is what I use. I started
spraying my beans (lima soy and green) a month ago. Non are resistant to
powdery mildew. So far so good, no powdery mildew. If you already have
powdery mildew it won't do any good to spray with baking soda. Good luck!


Quote:
>Baking soda and water should do the trick.  I don't know the proportions
>though.  IT should be sprayed on both sides of the leaves.


>> Hi, me again!

>> I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today has
>> some powdery mildew on the
>> leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but will
>> resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
>> antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
>> (Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?

>> Thanks,

>> cindi Zone 5 Detroit

>> --
>> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
>> Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

>> "Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
>> funeral" __Heathers__


>>   ^v^
>> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

>--
>Bev or Tom


 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Cindi Jame » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00


That sounds about right....I've also heard baking soda and water works to
*prevent* powdery mildew, but once you already have it? Help!

Somebody stop me before I head to the stinky chemicals section of Home
Depot...

cindi

: 1 teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water is what I use. I started
: spraying my beans (lima soy and green) a month ago. Non are resistant to
: powdery mildew. So far so good, no powdery mildew. If you already have
: powdery mildew it won't do any good to spray with baking soda. Good luck!


:>Baking soda and water should do the trick.  I don't know the proportions
:>though.  IT should be sprayed on both sides of the leaves.
:>
:>
:>> Hi, me again!
:>>
:>> I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today has
:>> some powdery mildew on the
:>> leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but will
:>> resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
:>> antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
:>> (Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?
:>>
:>> Thanks,
:>>
:>> cindi Zone 5 Detroit
:>>
:>> --
:>> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
:>> Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.
:>>
:>> "Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
:>> funeral" __Heathers__
:>>

:>>   ^v^
:>> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
:>
:>
:>
:>--
:>Bev or Tom

:>
:>

--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

"Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
funeral" __Heathers__


  ^v^      
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by el.. » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>That sounds about right....I've also heard baking soda and water works to
>*prevent* powdery mildew, but once you already have it? Help!

>Somebody stop me before I head to the stinky chemicals section of Home
>Depot...

I'm afraid you won't find anything effective for powdery mildew in
the stinky chemicals section of Home Depot. What is effective is
Rubigan, available from a number of mail-order places.
 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by m& » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>Hi, me again!

>I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today
has
>some powdery mildew on the
>leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but
will
>resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
>antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
>(Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?

>Thanks,

Neem products are labeled for use on mildews, or you can make your own:

In one gallon of water:

3 tablespoons of baking soda
2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
1 cup strong manure tea (which you can buy commercially now, if you
can't make your own)
1 clove of garlic in a blender with a cup of water-strain the solids
out and add the liquid to the gallon (also sold commercially now)
1 tablespoon liquid seaweed

Mix these all together into a pump up sprayer ( NOT a hose end sprayer
since they are not reliable proportioners)

Spray in the early morning, every day, for 3-4 days. Then, once a week
if you have time.  But every other week till the mildew is gone.  It is
a good idea to keep the leaves dry, clean up all debris below the
roses.  Prune away any plants which are preventing the roses from
having impecable air movement.  Check the soil for any damaged roots,
or poor drainage and ammend any of those cultural problems.  If you
have any cultural problems, you can pull the roses up when they are
dormant and completely ammend the soil with compost, soft rock
phosphate, and other materials which roses like. The replant them.

For  more organic rose information, you can go to
http://www.dirtdoctor.com

Victoria

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by m& » Mon, 13 Jul 1998 04:00:00



writes:
Quote:

>1 teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water is what I use. I started
>spraying my beans (lima soy and green) a month ago. Non are resistant
to
>powdery mildew. So far so good, no powdery mildew. If you already have
>powdery mildew it won't do any good to spray with baking soda. Good

luck!

Yes, it will.  You have to use a higher rate of the baking soda.  It
changes the pH levels of the leaf surface enough to be inhospitable to
the mildew and it dies.  It is black spot which you cannot get rid of
once it is there...unless you use toxic applications.

Victoria

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Thomas Pruf » Tue, 14 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
>Baking soda and water should do the trick.  I don't know the proportions
>though.  IT should be sprayed on both sides of the leaves.

From the American Rose Societiey FAQ:

"Frequently Asked Questions about Roses
(...)
Preventative spray treatments for blackspot
(...)
3.Some gardeners wishing to avoid fungicide use have tried using
baking soda to help prevent blackspot with mixed results. Combine
1-1/2 tablespoon baking soda and either 2 tablespoons horticultural
oil or a few drops of Ivory liquid with 1 gallon of water. Mix as well
as possible, and spray both sides of the leaves once a week. The Ivory
liquid helps the baking soda stick to the leaves.
    Reapply after a rain. Baking soda changes the P.H. of the leaves,
helping to prevent blackspot. Spraying with baking soda works for some
gardeners, but others have found that baking soda is not effective
enough in their climate.
(...)
[3.2] How do I avoid powdery mildew?
(...)
Also, spraying the foliage with a mixture of 1 T. baking soda per 1
gallon of water can be effective. "

Tom

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Cindi Jame » Tue, 14 Jul 1998 04:00:00


All right!  Thanks so much for the suggestions, guys.  I'll let you know
how it
goes.

cindi
no stanky chemicals for me, nosiree

--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

"Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
funeral" __Heathers__


  ^v^      
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by lpeters » Tue, 14 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

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> Newsgroups: rec.gardens
> Subject: Re: Organic treatment for powdery mildew?
> Date: 13 Jul 1998 07:31:21 EDT
> Organization: The house of Skank
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> All right!  Thanks so much for the suggestions, guys.  I'll let you know
> how it
> goes.

> cindi
> no stanky chemicals for me, nosiree

> --
> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
> Friends help you move.  Real friends help you move bodies.

> "Great pate, but I really gotta motor if I want to catch this
> funeral" __Heathers__


>   ^v^      
> *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Another spray to consider is MirAcid.
It also changes the pH on the leaves making Black Spot less likely to stick
around.
Meg
 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Nick LaRocc » Fri, 17 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
> I think I saw this on HGTV.
> Spray with baking soda and water.

Some of the HGTV stuff is not correct.

Baking soda will kill the mildew.  Unfortunately, it will also kill the
leaf surface that the mildew is infecting.  Sometimes the cure can be worse
than the disease.

--
Nick - NJ - Zone 7a

ANTI-SPAM: Please remove all '*' from email address
"Everything should be made as simple as possible,  but not simpler"
- Albert Einstein

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by Nick LaRocc » Fri, 17 Jul 1998 04:00:00




Quote:
> Hi, me again!

> I have a Gallica rose (Duchesse de Montebello) that I noticed today has
> some powdery mildew on the
> leaves.  I'd rather treat it with something organic if possible, but will
> resort to sprays if necessary.  Everything I've read says to use an
> antifungal spray or sulfur, lime-sulfur or Bordeaux mix.  Does anyone
> (Victoria, help!) know of an organic concoction I can whip up?

Since your Gallica rose has finished blooming for the year, the mildew is
essentially only a cosmetic problem at this point.  So you really don't
have to do anything.

Mildew can only grow during warm, dry days.  You can just leave it alone
and it will go away on its own when the weather cools or it starts raining.
 However, you should pick up any dropped leaves to remove as many of the
spores as you can.

If you feel you must do something, and you don't want to use a fungicide, a
 horticultural oil spray (AT SUMMER RATE!!) can reduce mildew.  Some
varieties are
sensitive to any hort oil in warm weather, so try out an inconspicuous stem
and
watch for foliage burning, or the cure will be worse than the disease.

Some sources recommend  adding baking soda to the hort oil, or using
baking soda alone, but we have found that baking soda will damage the
foliage that the mildew is growing on.

Personally, we don't do anything specifically for mildew on our
non-repeating roses.

--
Nick - NJ - Zone 7a

ANTI-SPAM: Please remove all '*' from email address
"Everything should be made as simple as possible,  but not simpler"
- Albert Einstein

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by gypsy on endo » Fri, 17 Jul 1998 04:00:00



Quote:



>> I think I saw this on HGTV.
>> Spray with baking soda and water.

>Some of the HGTV stuff is not correct.

SOME of the things??

try bordeaux dust...most excellent organic cure for powdery mildew

Quote:
>Baking soda will kill the mildew.  Unfortunately, it will also kill the
>leaf surface that the mildew is infecting.  Sometimes the cure can be worse
>than the disease.

>--
>Nick - NJ - Zone 7a

>ANTI-SPAM: Please remove all '*' from email address
>"Everything should be made as simple as possible,  but not simpler"
>- Albert Einstein

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by law&la » Sun, 19 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Hello!
I am confused.
If powdery mildew is due to dry weather, and black spots to
wet, how come I've got both on the same plant?
I am careful about not watering in the evening, and about
not getting the leaves wet, but what if it rains? And it
rains here in Vancouver.
It's also true that I find more leaves and blooms covered in
powdery mildew after rain.
Help!
Carolyn

PS
Someonw please tell me why I got an error message about the
message not sent because of more included text than new
text?
I am sure I have seen much longer included text!

<snip>
<snip>

Quote:
> Mildew can only grow during warm, dry days.  You can just leave it alone
> and it will go away on its own when the weather cools or it starts raining.
>  However, you should pick up any dropped leaves to remove as many of the
> spores as you can.

> Personally, we don't do anything specifically for mildew on our
> non-repeating roses.

> --
> Nick - NJ - Zone 7a

> ANTI-SPAM: Please remove all '*' from email address
> "Everything should be made as simple as possible,  but not simpler"
> - Albert Einstein

 
 
 

Organic treatment for powdery mildew?

Post by m& » Sun, 19 Jul 1998 04:00:00


Both powdery mildew and black spot are directly related to the amount
of humidity and moisture, especially when either of the two are already
present in leaf litter under the plants. Cleaning this litter up will
greatly reduce black spot and powdery  mildew from ever happening.
Watering at night, where the leaves are allowed to remain wet is how
these two infections spread.  By water.  Keep plants well aerated and
don't water at night and use the prescribed 1-3 heaping tablespoons of
baking soda in a gallon of water, and you will help to reduce this
problem.

Victoria


Quote:

>Hello!
>I am confused.
>If powdery mildew is due to dry weather, and black spots to
>wet, how come I've got both on the same plant?
>I am careful about not watering in the evening, and about
>not getting the leaves wet, but what if it rains? And it
>rains here in Vancouver.
>It's also true that I find more leaves and blooms covered in
>powdery mildew after rain.
>Help!
>Carolyn

>PS
>Someonw please tell me why I got an error message about the
>message not sent because of more included text than new
>text?
>I am sure I have seen much longer included text!


><snip>
><snip>

>> Mildew can only grow during warm, dry days.  You can just leave it
alone
>> and it will go away on its own when the weather cools or it starts
raining.
>>  However, you should pick up any dropped leaves to remove as many of
the
>> spores as you can.

>> Personally, we don't do anything specifically for mildew on our
>> non-repeating roses.

>> --
>> Nick - NJ - Zone 7a

>> ANTI-SPAM: Please remove all '*' from email address
>> "Everything should be made as simple as possible,  but not simpler"
>> - Albert Einstein