green pepper plant: help?

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green pepper plant: help?

Post by Cathy Watte » Sun, 15 Oct 1995 04:00:00



Hi. I grew a plant from the seeds of a store bought green pepper. It sits
in a pot near my window and gets lots of afternoon sun. It flowers, and it
starts to produce a tiny green pepper, but before it can grow big, the
darn thing falls off.

Why?

It doesn't look big enough to be too heavy for the plant. The stem it's on
begins to yellow where it connects to the main stem, and eventually just
disconnects completely. This has happened about four times now.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

--Cathy (Nova Scotia, Canada)

 
 
 

green pepper plant: help?

Post by Travis Salin » Sun, 15 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> Hi. I grew a plant from the seeds of a store bought green pepper. It sits
> in a pot near my window and gets lots of afternoon sun. It flowers, and it
> starts to produce a tiny green pepper, but before it can grow big, the
> darn thing falls off.

> Why?

> It doesn't look big enough to be too heavy for the plant. The stem it's on
> begins to yellow where it connects to the main stem, and eventually just
> disconnects completely. This has happened about four times now.

> Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

> --Cathy (Nova Scotia, Canada)

It's probably not getting pollinated.  Solanums tend to be
self-pollinating, but some agent (like the wind) needs to jostle the
flower around to transfer pollen from the stamen to the pistil.

Try tapping a new flower with your finger, or better yet get a tiny
paintbrush and swirl it around gently inside the flower.

Travis S.

 
 
 

green pepper plant: help?

Post by Rick Co » Sun, 15 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>Hi. I grew a plant from the seeds of a store bought green pepper. It sits
>in a pot near my window and gets lots of afternoon sun. It flowers, and it
>starts to produce a tiny green pepper, but before it can grow big, the
>darn thing falls off.

>Why?

Stress.

(Everything below assumes a bell pepper and not chiles)

How big is your plant? Peppers will start forming fruit long before the
plant can support them. If the plant isn't a foot or two high and nicely
bushy, the best thing you can do is pick those peppers off as they form.

Are you keeping the soil evenly moist? Don't get it soggy, but don't let it
dry out completely. Overwatering is a much more common killer than
underwatering.

Are you giving the plant enough light? This can be hard to do indoors.
Peppers like full sun if you have it. (If the leaves start to turn brown at
the edges give it a little less light.)

Is the pot big enough? Peppers need an extensive root system to support
fruiting. A one-gallon pot is the absolute minimum and five gallons is
better.

Finally, when you get done with all that, the fruit is likely to be
disappointing. The peppers you buy in the store are hybrids and they do no
breed true from seed.

--RC