Garden Software

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Garden Software

Post by Jack Honeycu » Sat, 23 May 1992 22:06:58



Hello All!

A post of a few days back asked for information on a Garden database.  I have
many shareware garden data base programs, and other garden software available
for down loading (no valadation required on the first visit) on my BBS, The
Garden pond BBS. 1-(503) 735-3074.  HST V Small.  Come and get'um.

Jack

 
 
 

Garden Software

Post by Lawrence Lond » Tue, 26 May 1992 11:51:13


Quote:
Jack Honeycutt writes:
>A post of a few days back asked for information on a garden database. I have
>many shareware garden data base programs, and other garden software available
>for down loading (no valadation required on the first visit) on my BBS, The
>Garden Pond BBS. 1-(503) 735-3074.  HST V Small.  Come and get'um.

Jack:
If you carry the Sustainable Agriculture echo (Backbone, tagname: SUST_AG)
could you post a list of those DB files for the folks there? Do you have
any DB doors for Remote Access?
Many of us (including me) would enjoy talking shop with you about water
gardening. I plan to build a goldfish/frog/water plant pool-within-a-patio
this summer and will need to locate materials for the project. I am
especially interested in starting a variety of plants in and around the
pool. Lotus, lillies, cattails and water hyacinths have their appeal. I am
in Zone 5 (Chapel Hill, N.C.). I believe all of these will survive here.
The pool will have a southern exposure with protection from North winds.
Will hyacinths scavenge excess nutrients from the water?

I have bunches of farm/garden files on my board that may interest
you. Freq FILES for a list 11PM-7AM EDT.

Lawrence

* Origin: EARTH*Net*Host:SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Echo*919-9323115 (1:151/502)

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Garden Software

Post by Jack Honeycu » Tue, 26 May 1992 11:19:02


Hello Lawrence!

25 May 92, Lawrence London writes to All:

Quote:
LL> Jack Honeycutt writes:

 >> A post of a few days back asked for information on a garden database. I
 >> have many shareware garden data base programs, and other garden software
 >> available for down loading (no valadation required on the first visit) on
 >> my BBS, The Garden Pond BBS. 1-(503) 735-3074.  HST V Small.  Come and
 >> get'um.

 LL> Jack:
 LL> If you carry the Sustainable Agriculture echo (Backbone, tagname: SUST_AG)
 LL> could you post a list of those DB files for the folks there? Do you have
 LL> any DB doors for Remote Access?

SUST_AG is not in the backbone feed for my area.    No doors.  You have to call
the 'Pond direct.  Sorry.

 LL> Many of us (including me) would enjoy talking shop with you about water
 LL> gardening. I plan to build a goldfish/frog/water plant pool-within-a-patio
 LL> this summer and will need to locate materials for the project. I am
 LL> especially interested in starting a variety of plants in and around the
 LL> pool. Lotus, lillies, cattails and water hyacinths have their appeal. I am
 LL> in Zone 5 (Chapel Hill, N.C.). I believe all of these will survive here.

Yes, all but the water hyacinths will over winter.

LL> The pool will have a southern exposure with protection from North winds.
LL> Will hyacinths scavenge excess nutrients from the water?

No, not excess.  As a matter of fact, the reason water hyacinths are used in the
pond so much is that they compete with the algae for food in the water and win.
The algae do not reproduce as fast, and the water will stay clear.

LL> I have bunches of farm/garden files on my board that may interest
LL> you. Freq FILES for a list 11PM-7AM EDT.
LL> Lawrence

Thanks.  I'll stop by sometime.

Jack

 
 
 

Garden Software

Post by William Stoff » Fri, 29 May 1992 02:49:50


Hi Jack,

In rec.gardens, Jack Honeycutt wrote (in part);

Quote:
> LL> pool. Lotus, lillies, cattails and water hyacinths have their appeal. I am
> LL> in Zone 5 (Chapel Hill, N.C.). I believe all of these will survive here.

>Yes, all but the water hyacinths will over winter.

Is it standard practice to just purchase new hyacinth every spring,
or is there a way to keep some in the house over winter?

Also, will shallow water plants such as dwarf bamboo and pickeral rush
over-winter in the pool? (I'm in Zone 7 near Annapolis, MD).

Bill
__________________________________________________________________________
Bill Stoffel              |  CARDEROCKDIV, NSWC  | First things first!    |

(410) 267-3825            |  Annapolis, MD 21402 |that order) - The Doctor|
_________________________________________________|______________ _________|

 
 
 

Garden Software

Post by kl.. » Sun, 31 May 1992 12:55:02


....

Quote:
> The pool will have a southern exposure with protection from North winds.
> Will hyacinths scavenge excess nutrients from the water?

About 20 years ago, a couple of botanists at Iowa State and the Ames
Sewage Treatment Plant experimented with using water hyacinths as
"nutrient sponges" in tertiary treatment -- basically grabbing excess
N, P and K (esp. N) -- then the water hyacinths were ground and
fed to carp.  Worked like a charm, except that they aren't winter
hardy in Iowa, and no one wanted to use carp that were fed on water
hyacinths that were fed on sewage effluent...    Sigh.

BTW, I'm having trouble keeping water hyacinth growing in our
greenhouse (I know, I know, folks in the SE US can't believe it)--
I'm beginning to suspect some sort of viral disease.  Guess I'll
have to go recollect some fresh specimens this winter, hmm???? ;-)

Kay Klier   Biology Dept  UNI