Azaleas

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Azaleas

Post by Nneka Egbuniw » Thu, 05 Dec 1996 04:00:00



Just got an azalea as a gift for the holiday season.
Any tips on basic care and maintenance of this plant? Does it like to be
kept wet or dry, shade or direct sun, indoors or outdoors. I want to do
this right 'cause its a beautiful plant. I'm really a plant novice the
longest living plant I own is a cactus.

--
Nneka
"Everything's possible, Nothing's guaranteed"

 
 
 

Azaleas

Post by lcarlso » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Nneka,
        Azalea is a difficult house plant but try this. A cool bright spot for the
remainder of winter. Then for spring summer fall, a larger pot (or if your
winters are warm then plant in high humus ground) and a cool growing area.
Keep evenly moist and fertilize weekly during the long days of the year (as
long as night temps are above 55) with an acid base fertilizer.
        Come next fall the plant should have set buds on the end of each new
shoot. These buds will have to cool down and rest for 8-12 weeks before you
can either bring it in to force indoor (if you have proper facilities) or
stay dormant until the next spring.

                Good luck,
                Les



Quote:
> Just got an azalea as a gift for the holiday season.
> Any tips on basic care and maintenance of this plant? Does it like to be
> kept wet or dry, shade or direct sun, indoors or outdoors. I want to do
> this right 'cause its a beautiful plant. I'm really a plant novice the
> longest living plant I own is a cactus.

> --
> Nneka
> "Everything's possible, Nothing's guaranteed"

 
 
 

Azaleas

Post by Christine A. Owen » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Just got an azalea as a gift for the holiday season.
> Any tips on basic care and maintenance of this plant? Does it like to be
> kept wet or dry, shade or direct sun, indoors or outdoors. I want to do
> this right 'cause its a beautiful plant. I'm really a plant novice the
> longest living plant I own is a cactus.

> --
> Nneka
> "Everything's possible, Nothing's guaranteed"

Your azalea will be happiest if you plant it out in a shady spot, and give it lots of
oak leaves to keep the soil moist (but not wet), and acid.

Chris Owens

 
 
 

Azaleas

Post by Robert Wagne » Sat, 07 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Where are you located? Not all Azaleas are equally hardy. Look for a label
in the pot; if you are lucky, it might have a cultivar name or group name,
then someone can tell you how hardy it is relative to where you live.

Your Azalea was probably grown in a cool (unheated or minimally so, but
frost-free) greenhouse. The humidity was fairly high compared to that of
the average house in winter, and light levels were fairly high. To keep it
from going into shock, keep it in as bright yet cool spot as possible. If
you have a cool, frost-free sun room, that would be ideal. In any case,
keep it away from radiators.

Don't ever let the pot dry out completely (almost surely fatal), but make
sure that no water is left standing in the catch basin under the pot longer
than just briefly; they don't like to be left in waterlogged, stagnant soil
because anaerobic conditions are *** most plants.

You can feed it with a water-soluble fertilizer. Pick one with an acidic
reaction, like "Miracid" <tm>.

Good luck.

Robert



Quote:
> Just got an azalea as a gift for the holiday season.
> Any tips on basic care and maintenance of this plant? Does it like to be
> kept wet or dry, shade or direct sun, indoors or outdoors. I want to do
> this right 'cause its a beautiful plant. I'm really a plant novice the
> longest living plant I own is a cactus.

> --
> Nneka
> "Everything's possible, Nothing's guaranteed"

 
 
 

Azaleas

Post by bianca1.. » Sun, 08 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Definitely plant it outside.  It will grow bigger and bloom every spring.

 
 
 

Azaleas

Post by Stephen M. Henni » Sun, 08 Dec 1996 04:00:00



Quote:


> > Just got an azalea as a gift for the holiday season.
> > Any tips on basic care and maintenance of this plant?
> > "Everything's possible, Nothing's guaranteed"

> Your azalea will be happiest if you plant it out in a shady spot, and
give it lots of
> oak leaves to keep the soil moist (but not wet), and acid.

Greenhouse azaleas are usually bred for ease of forcing and not for
hardiness.  Hence most must be taken in each fall if indeed they are
planted outside.  An exception are the Linwood Azaleas which are Greenhouse
azaleas bred back for hardiness.  They do quite well in New Jersey, USA.

Rhododendron and azaleas do best if kept in well drained soil and not
watered until the soil shows signs of drying out.  Too wet of a soil leads
to a root fungus that kills the plant.  The incorporation of peat moss into
the soil can prevent such a fungus.

--
Cheers, Steve Henning, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA
http://www.users.fast.net/~shenning