Growing Potato Onions

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Growing Potato Onions

Post by Mary C. W. Rushe » Sun, 05 Nov 2000 04:00:00



I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
appreciated:)

Thanks,

Mary

 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by Lorenzo L. Lov » Sun, 05 Nov 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
> or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
> if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
> planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
> appreciated:)

> Thanks,

> Mary

I've been growing them for four or five years. Got mine from Territorial
Seed Company (http://www.territorial-seed.com/) Also known as Multiplier
onions. Plant them in the fall anytime before the ground freezes. Plant
with the top of the bulb even with the ground surface, 8 to 10 inches
apart. Mulch with a couple inches of straw, dried grass or similar
material. I have read where other people say not to mulch them as it
causes rot. I have never had any rot or any other problem with them, but
I grow them in well drained raised beds. Be careful weeding, as the
plants will pull up very easily. By next summer, each bulb with have
multiplied into a cluster of 8 to 12 bulbs.  Pull up when the tops
yellow. Save the biggest for replanting.  After air drying, store the
remainder in a cool, well ventilated area. They keep very well. Raw,
they are medium spicy, not much different from commercial globe onions.
Cook the same way as globe onions. The main difference in use from globe
onions is that they make me cry while peeling them much worse then any
other onion does.

Lorenzo L. Love
http://www.thegrid.net/lllove

"If you have a Garden and a library, you have everything you need."
        Cicero

 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by Setzle » Mon, 06 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Right, except there are 2 kinds of multiplier onions: potato, and top bulbing,
or Egyptian onions. When you replant the potato onions, use the smaller ones to
get medium sized ones, the larger ones to get bigger ones next year.
susan
Quote:


> > I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
> > or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
> > if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
> > planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
> > appreciated:)

> > Thanks,

> > Mary

> I've been growing them for four or five years. Got mine from Territorial
> Seed Company (http://www.territorial-seed.com/) Also known as Multiplier
> onions. Plant them in the fall anytime before the ground freezes. Plant
> with the top of the bulb even with the ground surface, 8 to 10 inches
> apart. Mulch with a couple inches of straw, dried grass or similar
> material. I have read where other people say not to mulch them as it
> causes rot. I have never had any rot or any other problem with them, but
> I grow them in well drained raised beds. Be careful weeding, as the
> plants will pull up very easily. By next summer, each bulb with have
> multiplied into a cluster of 8 to 12 bulbs.  Pull up when the tops
> yellow. Save the biggest for replanting.  After air drying, store the
> remainder in a cool, well ventilated area. They keep very well. Raw,
> they are medium spicy, not much different from commercial globe onions.
> Cook the same way as globe onions. The main difference in use from globe
> onions is that they make me cry while peeling them much worse then any
> other onion does.

> Lorenzo L. Love
> http://www.thegrid.net/lllove

> "If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need."
>         Cicero

 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by FarmerDi » Mon, 06 Nov 2000 04:00:00


In my callow youth we all grew potato onions (multipliers) . We planted the
small sets to get large single onions and the large single onions to get a
cluster of small sets. Good keeping onion with strong flavor like a Danvers.
Poor yeild compared to seed onions and of course not good for onions rings as
even the large singles are compound onions, which will grow out as multiple
plants the following season.
 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by Lorenzo L. Lov » Mon, 06 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Right, except there are 2 kinds of multiplier onions: potato, and top bulbing,
> or Egyptian onions. When you replant the potato onions, use the smaller ones to
> get medium sized ones, the larger ones to get bigger ones next year.
> susan

I grow those too.
I grow the native American form, Catawissa onions, similar to Egyptian
onion but
even more cold hardy. They are grown primarily for the marble sized
bulblets that
grow on the flower stem. The bulblets can be used like any other onion,
moderately
sharp tasting, good whole like pearl onions or chop and cook or use raw.
They are
a real pain to peel but tasty. They only keep for a few months, so some
people
freeze them, I never have. Mostly I plant the bulblets for green onions.
They are
so winter hardy that I can have green onions all winter. They do stop
growing in
really cold weather so I plant before first frost so they grow enough
before it
gets too cold. If left to get too big, the leaves get too strong
tasting, so pull
early. The clusters of bottom bulbs of mature plants are far too strong
to eat
raw, but are good cooked. Try using about one quarter the amount you
would use of
globe onions. They don't keep well either, once out of the ground, so I
leave them
in until I need them. I often chip a clump of bulbs out of the frozen
ground. I've
had cold down to -15F without harming them. They grow wild well up into
Canada so
they can handle much colder then that.

You can grow them from bulblets or you can divide and replant the bottom
bulbs.
Fall plant. Catawissa onions produce blublets in the first year, but I
read that
Old World Egyptian onions don't produce until the second year. I don't
have any
experience with those.

You can start harvesting the bulblets as soon as they get big enough to
be worth
picking, which should be late spring or eary summer; and continue
harvesting up to
hard frost, when you should pick all the remaining bulblets. The bottom
bulbs take
about a year to reach full size, and can be harvested any time of the
year. They
are perennials and as far as I  know, they live many years. You should
only have
to replant those you dig up for the bottom bulbs. They do require
staking or
caging. The tall stems get weighed down with bulblets and bend over to
the ground,
allowing the bulblets to take root; therefore the name walking onions.
To get max
size for the bulblets, you need to keep them from doing this. I put a
stake at
each corner of my small patches and run a cord around the whole patch
about two
feet up.

Territorial Seed Co. ( http://www.territorial-seed.com/ ) has both the
Catawissa
and the true Egyptian onions as well as potato onions.

Quote:



> > > I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
> > > or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
> > > if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
> > > planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
> > > appreciated:)

> > > Thanks,

> > > Mary

> > I've been growing them for four or five years. Got mine from Territorial
> > Seed Company (http://www.territorial-seed.com/) Also known as Multiplier
> > onions. Plant them in the fall anytime before the ground freezes. Plant
> > with the top of the bulb even with the ground surface, 8 to 10 inches
> > apart. Mulch with a couple inches of straw, dried grass or similar
> > material. I have read where other people say not to mulch them as it
> > causes rot. I have never had any rot or any other problem with them, but
> > I grow them in well drained raised beds. Be careful weeding, as the
> > plants will pull up very easily. By next summer, each bulb with have
> > multiplied into a cluster of 8 to 12 bulbs.  Pull up when the tops
> > yellow. Save the biggest for replanting.  After air drying, store the
> > remainder in a cool, well ventilated area. They keep very well. Raw,
> > they are medium spicy, not much different from commercial globe onions.
> > Cook the same way as globe onions. The main difference in use from globe
> > onions is that they make me cry while peeling them much worse then any
> > other onion does.

> > Lorenzo L. Love
> > http://www.thegrid.net/lllove

> > "If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need."
> >         Cicero

 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by Mary C. W. Rushe » Fri, 10 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Thanks so much for replying and for the information.  I have the Territorial
Seed Company catalog and will look multiplier onions up.  Mine are also
planted in well drained raised beds and I have mulched them in with grass
clippings.  I am in zone 7a and the beds are next to the house getting a lot
of protection from cold (leaf lettuce has over wintered and come back in the
Spring).  The ones I planted were the size of shallots -- how big do they get?
Thanks again!
Quote:


> > I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
> > or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
> > if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
> > planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
> > appreciated:)

> > Thanks,

> > Mary

> I've been growing them for four or five years. Got mine from Territorial
> Seed Company (http://www.territorial-seed.com/) Also known as Multiplier
> onions. Plant them in the fall anytime before the ground freezes. Plant
> with the top of the bulb even with the ground surface, 8 to 10 inches
> apart. Mulch with a couple inches of straw, dried grass or similar
> material. I have read where other people say not to mulch them as it
> causes rot. I have never had any rot or any other problem with them, but
> I grow them in well drained raised beds. Be careful weeding, as the
> plants will pull up very easily. By next summer, each bulb with have
> multiplied into a cluster of 8 to 12 bulbs.  Pull up when the tops
> yellow. Save the biggest for replanting.  After air drying, store the
> remainder in a cool, well ventilated area. They keep very well. Raw,
> they are medium spicy, not much different from commercial globe onions.
> Cook the same way as globe onions. The main difference in use from globe
> onions is that they make me cry while peeling them much worse then any
> other onion does.

> Lorenzo L. Love
> http://www.thegrid.net/lllove

> "If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need."
>         Cicero

 
 
 

Growing Potato Onions

Post by Lorenzo L. Lov » Fri, 10 Nov 2000 04:00:00


You shouldn't have any problem. I'm also in zone 7a (Yreka, CA) and like
you use dried grass clipping for mulch. These are closer to their wild
ancestors then domestic globe onions and therefore more rugged and pest
resistant.  Shallot size is about normal. Mine mostly range from 3/4
inch to 1 1/2 inch with a few up to 2 inch. I get enough from a 4 foot
by 4 foot bed to last me five or six months. I wish I had more garden
space to plant a whole years worth.

Lorenzo


Quote:

> Thanks so much for replying and for the information.  I have the Territorial
> Seed Company catalog and will look multiplier onions up.  Mine are also
> planted in well drained raised beds and I have mulched them in with grass
> clippings.  I am in zone 7a and the beds are next to the house getting a lot
> of protection from cold (leaf lettuce has over wintered and come back in the
> Spring).  The ones I planted were the size of shallots -- how big do they get?
> Thanks again!



> > > I bought 1/2 lb. of these at my local farm and garden.  I've never eaten
> > > or harvested them before.  Can anyone tell me what they are used in or
> > > if there will be bulbs for planting next year (offspring from what I've
> > > planted this fall)?  Any advice/relating of experience is greatly
> > > appreciated:)

> > > Thanks,

> > > Mary

> > I've been growing them for four or five years. Got mine from Territorial
> > Seed Company (http://www.territorial-seed.com/) Also known as Multiplier
> > onions. Plant them in the fall anytime before the ground freezes. Plant
> > with the top of the bulb even with the ground surface, 8 to 10 inches
> > apart. Mulch with a couple inches of straw, dried grass or similar
> > material. I have read where other people say not to mulch them as it
> > causes rot. I have never had any rot or any other problem with them, but
> > I grow them in well drained raised beds. Be careful weeding, as the
> > plants will pull up very easily. By next summer, each bulb with have
> > multiplied into a cluster of 8 to 12 bulbs.  Pull up when the tops
> > yellow. Save the biggest for replanting.  After air drying, store the
> > remainder in a cool, well ventilated area. They keep very well. Raw,
> > they are medium spicy, not much different from commercial globe onions.
> > Cook the same way as globe onions. The main difference in use from globe
> > onions is that they make me cry while peeling them much worse then any
> > other onion does.

> > Lorenzo L. Love
> > http://www.thegrid.net/lllove

> > "If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need."
> >         Cicero