? powdery mildew on zucchini.

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? powdery mildew on zucchini.

Post by Wm. E. Fletche » Fri, 13 Jul 2001 08:41:42



Great Garden with four varieties of squash , cucumbers but the zucchini
has huge leaves that are streaked with what I would call powdery
mildew.  the plants have already produced about four nice zucchinis but
now the leves seem to be slowly dying.  Help please!  All the summer,
butternut and cucumbers seen to look helathy and doing well.  Thanks
Bill Fletcher
 
 
 

? powdery mildew on zucchini.

Post by T Jaszewsk » Fri, 13 Jul 2001 08:04:09


On Wed, 11 Jul 2001 18:41:42 -0500, "Wm. E. Fletcher"

Quote:

>Great garden with four varieties of squash , cucumbers but the zucchini
>has huge leaves that are streaked with what I would call powdery
>mildew.  the plants have already produced about four nice zucchinis but
>now the leves seem to be slowly dying.  Help please!  All the summer,
>butternut and cucumbers seen to look helathy and doing well.  Thanks
>Bill Fletcher

if you make compost, a tea made from your compost would likely be very
effective.

"Imagination is more important than knowledge"
 Albert Einstein

 
 
 

? powdery mildew on zucchini.

Post by Pat Kiewi » Fri, 13 Jul 2001 20:03:56



Quote:

>Great garden with four varieties of squash , cucumbers but the zucchini
>has huge leaves that are streaked with what I would call powdery
>mildew.  the plants have already produced about four nice zucchinis but
>now the leves seem to be slowly dying.  Help please!  All the summer,
>butternut and cucumbers seen to look helathy and doing well.  Thanks

If your butternut and cukes are ok, I think it's time to take a closer
look at the zucchinis.  I suspect there might be more than mildew
happening there.  You don't say where you are located, but if it is
anywhere in the eastern 2/3 of North America, you should check your
plants for squash vine borers.  If you see any wet, sawdust like material
around oozing from the stem of the plant, you have borers.

You can try fishing them out with fine wires (hooked on the end) or
injecting the stems with either BT (Dipel, Thuricide, and other brand names)
or beneficial nematodes.  (With bush squashes the advice to slit the stem
open and bury it isn't practical.)

If you see no signs of borers, try using compost tea, or dressing around the
plants with compost and spraying with a solution of diluted skim milk,
at a rate of about 7 oz per gallon.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
(attributed to Don Marti)

 
 
 

? powdery mildew on zucchini.

Post by smittyct » Sat, 14 Jul 2001 04:09:57


hello there,
Here is a site you might wish to check out.
Use of Baking Soda as a Fungicide
http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/bakingsoda.html

A sample of what this site has to offer follows:

An article in the February, 1996 issue of GrowerTalks magazine follows up on
the continuing research at Cornell. Testing with a variety of bicarbonates
revealed that selecting the correct bicarbonate for a particular disease is
important. Dr. Horst's research team found that ammonium bicarbonate had the
strongest effect on some diseases, while potassium and sodium bicarbonates
worked best against others. Potassium bicarbonate provided the best control
of PM. "Sodium bicarbonate is okay, but it's not as good," Horst is quoted
as saying. "And ammonium bicarbonate doesn't do the job on powdery mildew."
He points out that while conventional chemical controls for PM are
preventatives only, bicarbonates can eliminate the disease after it has
already appeared on certain crops-he mentions roses and an unspecified
ornamental-provided the infection is not severe. The only plant damage
associated with bicarbonates applied in the trials was foliar burning when
application rates exceeded recommended concentrations. Testing established
that sodium bicarbonate does not increase the levels of sodium in plant
tissues, soil, or runoff water. While their precise mode of action against
fungi is not understood, Horst states that bicarbonates seem to damage the
cell wall membrane in PM spores. He also believes pH to be a factor in
bicarbonate effectiveness. In any case, bicarbonates are contact fungicides,
and kill PM within minutes (8).

--
smitty List papa at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EdenRenewed

 
 
 

? powdery mildew on zucchini.

Post by Terra Viva Organic » Sun, 15 Jul 2001 10:10:36


It does sound exactly like powdery mildew and I'll second the suggestion to
use milk. The research that was done on using milk as a fungicide was
conducted on cucumber & squash plants that were being infected with powdery
mildew.

Researchers found that milk diluted 1 part milk to 9 parts water did an even
better job than most chemical fungicides. Spray every 7 days and remember to
coat the underside of the leaf too.

Arzeena
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Order your winter garden kit - 14 seed packets
for only $16.99 (reg. $30). Details in this month's
edition of Organic Living. Subscribe to the free
e-newsletter at: http://www.tvorganics.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Quote:

> >Great garden with four varieties of squash , cucumbers but the zucchini
> >has huge leaves that are streaked with what I would call powdery
> >mildew.  the plants have already produced about four nice zucchinis but
> >now the leves seem to be slowly dying.  Help please!  All the summer,
> >butternut and cucumbers seen to look helathy and doing well.  Thanks

> If your butternut and cukes are ok, I think it's time to take a closer
> look at the zucchinis.  I suspect there might be more than mildew
> happening there.  You don't say where you are located, but if it is
> anywhere in the eastern 2/3 of North America, you should check your
> plants for squash vine borers.  If you see any wet, sawdust like material
> around oozing from the stem of the plant, you have borers.

> You can try fishing them out with fine wires (hooked on the end) or
> injecting the stems with either BT (Dipel, Thuricide, and other brand
names)
> or beneficial nematodes.  (With bush squashes the advice to slit the stem
> open and bury it isn't practical.)

> If you see no signs of borers, try using compost tea, or dressing around
the
> plants with compost and spraying with a solution of diluted skim milk,
> at a rate of about 7 oz per gallon.
> --
> Pat in Plymouth MI

> Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
> (attributed to Don Marti)