Small hard lump

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Small hard lump

Post by Graem » Fri, 06 Sep 2002 09:21:08



Hi,

I been around this newsgroup for a while now, but this is the first time I
have needed to ask for your advise.  Today I found a small hard lump on one
of my male rats.  Its not round, more like a tube like shape (bone like), or
that is what it appears to be.

It appears at the top of his back leg - at the very top, ie from where his
leg ends, and it goes up wards.  It seems to be attached and does not move.
I can't seem to find anything else.

I had to deal with tumours with my first rat (we had them removed and she
lived at least another 6 months), but they were soft to touch and could be
moved a bit, but this time they feel very different.  I am about to book a
vets visit first thing in the morning, but I would like some pre-advise if
possable.

Sadly from reading some posts in this newsgroup about this type of lump, it
doesn't sound good.  Money really is no object, and I would pay anything for
him so any treatment is fine from the vets.  But would the outcome, should
it be removed, be good?  From what I read about this kind of lump I would
say no.

I was watching him walking today and he is using the leg as normal, he is
eating. playing and cleaning like any other rat, so that is a good sign.  He
is still quite a young rat, about 1 and a half years old.  I want to do
whats best for him of course, so any advise/comments would be great.

The sad thing is should the worst happen, while I have lost a rat before,
this is the first time I have got 2, so I am very worried about his brother.

Thanks,

Graeme

 
 
 

Small hard lump

Post by Mark Tomlinso » Sat, 07 Sep 2002 11:44:48


Hard lumps are not good.  But we can theorize and theorize and still be
wrong.  Get him to the vet.

--
Mark Tomlinson
"I'm not a trouble maker; I am a catalyst for change."


Quote:
> Hi,

> I been around this newsgroup for a while now, but this is the first time I
> have needed to ask for your advise.  Today I found a small hard lump on
one
> of my male rats.  Its not round, more like a tube like shape (bone like),
or
> that is what it appears to be.

> It appears at the top of his back leg - at the very top, ie from where his
> leg ends, and it goes up wards.  It seems to be attached and does not
move.
> I can't seem to find anything else.

> I had to deal with tumours with my first rat (we had them removed and she
> lived at least another 6 months), but they were soft to touch and could be
> moved a bit, but this time they feel very different.  I am about to book a
> vets visit first thing in the morning, but I would like some pre-advise if
> possable.

> Sadly from reading some posts in this newsgroup about this type of lump,
it
> doesn't sound good.  Money really is no object, and I would pay anything
for
> him so any treatment is fine from the vets.  But would the outcome, should
> it be removed, be good?  From what I read about this kind of lump I would
> say no.

> I was watching him walking today and he is using the leg as normal, he is
> eating. playing and cleaning like any other rat, so that is a good sign.
He
> is still quite a young rat, about 1 and a half years old.  I want to do
> whats best for him of course, so any advise/comments would be great.

> The sad thing is should the worst happen, while I have lost a rat before,
> this is the first time I have got 2, so I am very worried about his
brother.

> Thanks,

> Graeme

 
 
 

Small hard lump

Post by Graem » Sun, 08 Sep 2002 02:02:33


Well today was the vets visit and it wasn't good news :-(  It seems to be a
tumour.  The vet done a needle biopsy and could not get anything, so that
kind of ruled out the fact it was anthing else but a tumour.

Sadly nothing can be done until next week (17th) as the vet is going on
hoilday next week, and he doesn't really want the stand-in vet to do
anything.  But at the end of the day I feel the outcome won't be great, due
to the fact its a hard lump.  If we go ahead, then on the17th they will take
an x-ray and see if it has spread to any other parts of the body.

And then maybe take biopsy to find out what type of tumour it is, we can
then take it from there.  I want what is best for him, maybe just not doing
anything and leaving it, and then when it becomes too much have him put to
sleep.  That way least he enjoys the months/weeks he has left and not suffer
an op or anything.

Such a hard choice to make really :-(

Graeme

Quote:
> Hard lumps are not good.  But we can theorize and theorize and still be
> wrong.  Get him to the vet.

> --
> Mark Tomlinson
> "I'm not a trouble maker; I am a catalyst for change."



> > Hi,

> > I been around this newsgroup for a while now, but this is the first time
I
> > have needed to ask for your advise.  Today I found a small hard lump on
> one
> > of my male rats.  Its not round, more like a tube like shape (bone
like),
> or
> > that is what it appears to be.

> > It appears at the top of his back leg - at the very top, ie from where
his
> > leg ends, and it goes up wards.  It seems to be attached and does not
> move.
> > I can't seem to find anything else.

> > I had to deal with tumours with my first rat (we had them removed and
she
> > lived at least another 6 months), but they were soft to touch and could
be
> > moved a bit, but this time they feel very different.  I am about to book
a
> > vets visit first thing in the morning, but I would like some pre-advise
if
> > possable.

> > Sadly from reading some posts in this newsgroup about this type of lump,
> it
> > doesn't sound good.  Money really is no object, and I would pay anything
> for
> > him so any treatment is fine from the vets.  But would the outcome,
should
> > it be removed, be good?  From what I read about this kind of lump I
would
> > say no.

> > I was watching him walking today and he is using the leg as normal, he
is
> > eating. playing and cleaning like any other rat, so that is a good sign.
> He
> > is still quite a young rat, about 1 and a half years old.  I want to do
> > whats best for him of course, so any advise/comments would be great.

> > The sad thing is should the worst happen, while I have lost a rat
before,
> > this is the first time I have got 2, so I am very worried about his
> brother.

> > Thanks,

> > Graeme

 
 
 

Small hard lump

Post by zac » Sun, 08 Sep 2002 09:37:28


Quote:

> Well today was the vets visit and it wasn't good news :-(  It seems to be a
> tumour.  The vet done a needle biopsy and could not get anything, so that
> kind of ruled out the fact it was anthing else but a tumour.

> Sadly nothing can be done until next week (17th) as the vet is going on
> hoilday next week, and he doesn't really want the stand-in vet to do
> anything.  But at the end of the day I feel the outcome won't be great, due
> to the fact its a hard lump.  If we go ahead, then on the17th they will take
> an x-ray and see if it has spread to any other parts of the body.

> And then maybe take biopsy to find out what type of tumour it is, we can
> then take it from there.  I want what is best for him, maybe just not doing
> anything and leaving it, and then when it becomes too much have him put to
> sleep.  That way least he enjoys the months/weeks he has left and not suffer
> an op or anything.

> Such a hard choice to make really :-(

Poor baby. My beutiful lilac-colored Louise developedman hard lumps
all at once across her back and haunches.  My vet (who miraculously
pulled Princess Sarah through) said they were anchored into her muscle
and that were unremovable. She was going to try, but wanted permission
to put her down during the procedure if it didn't look good.  I said
"no."  I don't know if it was the right thing to do or not, as the
lumps grew she worried them so much that her sink over them became
scabby and she would often bleed from the scabs by chewing them.
Then, to top it off, she developed a mammary (soft, and probably
removeable) tumor.  Poor Louise.  She got around ok, but started
lousing weight and getting thin from the tumors taking the nutrition
from her "real" body, much like what happened to Princess Sarah.  It
gets to one of those points where you just don't know what to do. One
night, she climbed up onto my shoulder and kind of leaned against me
for about 20 mins.  Then she got down and I didn't find her until a
day and a half later under a pile of dirty clothes.  She had, of
course, passed on, saying "goodbye" to me, which was rather touching.

Rats are so stoic it is hard to know what to do.  Thinking back, it is
tempting to say "at this point, I would have taken her in to be
euthanized, ending her suffering" but I just don't know.  She got by.
Visually, she looked like she had auto-resurrected from the local pet
cemetary, due to all the scabs and lumps and such, but her personality
never really changed.  I just don't know.  What is "obvious"
suffering?  Sarah was thankfully saved by a competent and
compassionate vet within probably two weeks I was either going to put
her down (since the tumor weighed more than "her", amazing, but true).
 Maybe I thought I would never put Louise down, but was going to let
nature take its course.  I don't know.  Tough choice.  I know I did
not want her to go through and try to recover from painful surgeries,
and my vet thought so, too.  I don't know if any of this helps, it is
just my thoughts.