Pond visitor

Description of your first forum.

Pond visitor

Post by Bonnie Espenshad » Thu, 06 Dec 2001 08:08:37



A hawk visited my pond this afternoon.  It was perched on
one of the rocks near the pond.  I think it might have been
waiting for a chipmunk to appear.  I watched for quite some
time and left one window to get a better look at another
window.  The hawk went to
the very edge of the pond and looked as if it wanted a
drink, next
thing I knew it had hopped into the water.  It must have
landed on
a pot or something it splashed some and then took off and
landed in
the Japanese maple tree- I checked it took no fish.  After
preening and sunning it took off.  I believe it was a pigeon
hawk.
--
Bonnie
NJ
http://hpphoto.com/home/ViewMyAlbum.asp?coll_id=876614
http://www.users.fast.net/~maebe/index.htm
 
 
 

Pond visitor

Post by June » Thu, 06 Dec 2001 10:12:55



Quote:
> A hawk visited my pond this afternoon.  It was perched on
> one of the rocks near the pond.  I think it might have been
> waiting for a chipmunk to appear.  I watched for quite some
> time and left one window to get a better look at another
> window.  The hawk went to
> the very edge of the pond and looked as if it wanted a
> drink, next
> thing I knew it had hopped into the water.  It must have
> landed on
> a pot or something it splashed some and then took off and
> landed in
> the Japanese maple tree- I checked it took no fish.  After
> preening and sunning it took off.  I believe it was a pigeon
> hawk.
> --
> Bonnie
> NJ
> http://hpphoto.com/home/ViewMyAlbum.asp?coll_id=876614
> http://www.users.fast.net/~maebe/index.htm

Hi Bonnie,
I'd call that either a Cooper's or Sharp-shinned hawk. They prefer, you're
right, pigeons (and the one at my home catches them in flight) or small
birds. I have a pair of Sharp-shinned hawks that nest nearby and pay
frequent visits . The best way to attract them is having a bird feeder. I
can always tell when one is in the area even without sighting. The birds get
silent and go into the pine trees. I've never seen the hawk here near or in
the pond..that must've been a surprise and neat to see. :-)
This is one of the pluses of having a pond, enjoying the different wildlife
it often attracts.

best wishes,
June

 
 
 

Pond visitor

Post by Bonnie Espenshad » Thu, 06 Dec 2001 22:20:08


Quote:

> Hi Bonnie,
> I'd call that either a Cooper's or Sharp-shinned hawk. They prefer, you're
> right, pigeons (and the one at my home catches them in flight) or small
> birds. I have a pair of Sharp-shinned hawks that nest nearby and pay
> frequent visits . The best way to attract them is having a bird feeder. I
> can always tell when one is in the area even without sighting. The birds get
> silent and go into the pine trees. I've never seen the hawk here near or in
> the pond..that must've been a surprise and neat to see. :-)
> This is one of the pluses of having a pond, enjoying the different wildlife
> it often attracts.

> best wishes,
> June

Hi June I guess is might have been a female Sharp-shinned
hawk or
a female Pigeon hawk which is really a falcon.  The females
look very similiar and I really did have a chance to study
it well.
--
Bonnie
NJ
http://hpphoto.com/home/ViewMyAlbum.asp?coll_id=876614
http://www.users.fast.net/~maebe/index.htm
 
 
 

Pond visitor

Post by June » Fri, 07 Dec 2001 01:23:45



Quote:

> > Hi Bonnie,
> > I'd call that either a Cooper's or Sharp-shinned hawk. They prefer,
you're
> > right, pigeons (and the one at my home catches them in flight) or small
> > birds. I have a pair of Sharp-shinned hawks that nest nearby and pay
> > frequent visits . The best way to attract them is having a bird feeder.
I
> > can always tell when one is in the area even without sighting. The birds
get
> > silent and go into the pine trees. I've never seen the hawk here near or
in
> > the pond..that must've been a surprise and neat to see. :-)
> > This is one of the pluses of having a pond, enjoying the different
wildlife
> > it often attracts.

> > best wishes,
> > June

> Hi June I guess is might have been a female Sharp-shinned
> hawk or
> a female Pigeon hawk which is really a falcon.  The females
> look very similiar and I really did have a chance to study
> it well.
> --
> Bonnie
> NJ
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/
> http://www.moonsgarden.com/~maebe/index.htm

Geeze, I never thought of a Kestrel (I've heard them called 'Sparrow hawks')
or a Peregrine falcon.The Kestrel is smaller than a female sharpie and  the
falcon about the same size, both have very distinct *** markings and more
colourful than the hawks..too bad you weren't able to get a real good look.
I haven't seen either of those in my backyard at the POND. (had to get that
obligatory pond refernce in lest the good folks here banish me to
rec.birds;-) but we don't have the open fields nearby as we had in the past.
I'd love to have either or both on my 'backyard' bird list. I hope it was a
Falcon.You rarely see them in a 'backyard' and they are not as plentiful as
they used to be even with the breeding efforts being made although they are
increasing in number. I do have Cooper's and Sharpies who make a habit of
'hunting' near my feeders.

June
(PA)