Liner or no liner

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Liner or no liner

Post by <kel.. » Wed, 03 Apr 1996 04:00:00



Gergely,  I am not in the least experienced, and I know nothing about Ohio,
but let me throw in my two cents worth of questions:

Is your water table high there?  If not, it seems that your pond will drain
without a liner.  If your yard is mucky, is it because of a concave surface?
Do you need to bring in a few yards of dirt to level it out first?  Where is
your trench taking the water?  Will it end up seeping back into the yard and
pond?  

It seems to me that having a liner or not having one should not affect the
growth of algea too much.  Algea grows in the sun.  Water lilies or other
shade for the water, except for trees, whose leaves, I'm told are toxic
when they decay, should reduce the growth in your climate.
(Here in Texas algea grows by the time you can take a glass of ice water
across the porch!)

Are you planning on stocking fish or plants?  How big will your pond be?

Kellie

 
 
 

Liner or no liner

Post by Troy Hendricks » Wed, 03 Apr 1996 04:00:00


I have had my pond under (partly) a tree since I started it, and
asides from having to spend a few hours a week skimming, I have seen
no ill effects, and the shade is definitely beneficial. In the fall,
when they really come down, there is a browning from the leaves, but
the fish do not seem affected by it, and depending on the species (I
have had tropicals in before) this browning from the tanin (?) is
actually a part of there enviroment. I would be interested if someone
knows of any toxins though, this is the first I have heard of it.
 
 
 

Liner or no liner

Post by <kel.. » Fri, 05 Apr 1996 04:00:00


 Troy,

I've been reading library books on ponding and almost all say to keep
tree leaves out of ponds because when they decay they are toxic to fish.
This seems odd to me because of the fact that natural ponds very often
have trees everywhere and Mother Nature doesn't skim leaves.  

A guy I ran into at Home Depot perusing the supply of ponding supplies
said he inherited three neglected ponds from a former owner of his home.  
He tried leaving the leaves thinking the fish would use them to breed and
hide in, but he had a big fish die off.  He started skimming and the problem
ended.

HOWEVER, he also said that when he moved in the ponds were so murky
they didn't know they had any fish in there and there turned out to be
a large number of koi and goldfish.  It sounds contradictory.  I wonder if the
die off might have just been from learning how to deal with the pond.  He
said he keeps his water clear with lots of filtering and his fish are healthy.
Who knows???

Kellie

 
 
 

Liner or no liner

Post by Paul L » Sat, 06 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>A guy I ran into at Home Depot perusing the supply of ponding supplies
>said he inherited three neglected ponds from a former owner of his home.  
>He tried leaving the leaves thinking the fish would use them to breed and
>hide in, but he had a big fish die off.  He started skimming and the problem
>ended.

>HOWEVER, he also said that when he moved in the ponds were so murky
>they didn't know they had any fish in there and there turned out to be
>a large number of koi and goldfish.  It sounds contradictory.  I wonder if the
>die off might have just been from learning how to deal with the pond.  He
>said he keeps his water clear with lots of filtering and his fish are healthy.
>Who knows???

The clear water is just for US the owner to enjoy the fish. Has nothing to
do with the important factors like pH, Ammonia and the poisoneous chemical
level which determine the fat of the fish. You do, however, have a better
chance to notice your fish develop any problem if you can see them.

Paul

 
 
 

Liner or no liner

Post by esp.. » Mon, 08 Apr 1996 05:00:00



Quote:

>  Troy,

> I've been reading library books on ponding and almost all say to keep
> tree leaves out of ponds because when they decay they are toxic to fish.
> This seems odd to me because of the fact that natural ponds very often
> have trees everywhere and Mother Nature doesn't skim leaves.  

> A guy I ran into at Home Depot perusing the supply of ponding supplies
> said he inherited three neglected ponds from a former owner of his home.  
> He tried leaving the leaves thinking the fish would use them to breed and
> hide in, but he had a big fish die off.  He started skimming and the problem
> ended.

> HOWEVER, he also said that when he moved in the ponds were so murky
> they didn't know they had any fish in there and there turned out to be
> a large number of koi and goldfish.  It sounds contradictory.  I wonder if the
> die off might have just been from learning how to deal with the pond.  He
> said he keeps his water clear with lots of filtering and his fish are healthy.
> Who knows???

> Kellie

Regarding leaves in pond.  Gray's Fish Pond Supply in North Carolina suggested
removing all leaves.  Owner said leaves left in pond would pollute water and
possibly add parasites that would damage scales on fish.  He had just returned
from a seminar conducted by fish vets, which also offered this advice.  Of
course leaves would also clog up filters, etc.  He suggested that parasites
under the scales of the fish would be one of, if not the most important
problems facing the fish.  I think skimming off leaves and vacumning leaves off
bottom would be the best route.
 
 
 

Liner or no liner

Post by Ingrid K. Buxt » Sat, 13 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Regarding leaves in pond.  Gray's Fish Pond Supply in North Carolina suggested
>removing all leaves.  Owner said leaves left in pond would pollute water and
>possibly add parasites that would damage scales on fish.  He had just returned
>from a seminar conducted by fish vets, which also offered this advice.  Of
>course leaves would also clog up filters, etc.  He suggested that parasites
>under the scales of the fish would be one of, if not the most important
>problems facing the fish.  I think skimming off leaves and vacumning leaves off
>bottom would be the best route.

... I really doubt that plant diseases and pests would bother fish..
more likely the fish would eat the pests.. the major problem with
leaves is they rot and when at the bottom of the pond, the bacteria
are breaking them down anaerobically (without oxygen).. now, when the
stuff gets stirred up, the bacteria suddenly go into aerobic
metabolism and use up all the oxygen.. the largest fish are the first
to suffer from lack of oxygen.. be sure when removing leaves (or
anything from bottom) that you have the hose standing by to do a
partial water change in case stuff gets stirred up and the fish head
for the surface.. the gunk also, I think, can clog their gills..
Ingrid
Dr. Ingrid Buxton
Marquette University
Immunologist stuck in the Dept.of Physics
"Spelling challenged writer"