One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish

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One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish

Post by Chuckle » Mon, 17 Jun 2002 23:48:35



As a new *** on a different front of the green water
battle, I "thinned the herd" yesterday.  I removed a total
of 15 fish: 11 koi and 4 smaller (about 5 cm, full-bellied)
fish.  I think the smaller fish are baby koi - but they
don't have the koi coloring.  Are baby koi unremarkable dark
silverish in color?  If so, how long do they stay in this
stage?  If not, what other kind of fish are in my pond?

Chuck (p.s. keep reading)

P.S.  Active fronts on the green water battle:
Major front - floaters (water hyacinth, water lettuce)
Minor front - oxygenators (hornwort, parrot feather)
minor - new stock tank biofilter
minor - potash
minor - chemical stabilization (target - pH less than pegged
on my high pH kit)
Victorious front - reduce bioload (30(?) koi to less than
20(?))
Future front - veggie filter (for now, using top surface of
stock tank biofilter)

should my oxygenator minor front be escalated to a major
front?
what about watercress as floater in stock tank biofilter?

 
 
 

One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish

Post by K30 » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 00:53:32


I love your post header ;-)

Chuckles wrote >>what about watercress as floater in stock tank biofilter?<<

I tried this....
and I think it depends how far down in the tank your biofilter media is.
Our filter is set up with a settling space and then the water upflows through
black vinyl screening.

Anyway the screening was too close to the watercress and wow! that watercress
sent roots to clamp on in the screening - ripping it out was a major chore.
Then I tried putting watercress in these curved water plant baskets that I
attached to the side with lengths of clothes hangers.
Some critter, I think a mouse, spent all its time t*** the watercress to
the water line. Took those out.

Went back to floating water hyacinth on the top of the filter, use a wide grid
screen to keep them from plugging the outlets and watch it closely.

The hyacinth is already 10 inches tall, dark green and even bloomed - which
puts a spanner in my theory that water hyacinth need to think they are dying
before they will bloom... maybe it was the snap of cooler weather, they thought
fall was on the way?

k30a

 
 
 

One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish

Post by Rod Farl » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 02:14:31


Quote:
"Chuckles" writes:
>P.S.  Active fronts on the green water battle...
>should my oxygenator minor front be escalated to a major
>front?

Perhaps so.  

If you don't have full coverage of water hyacinth and lilies (and I don't
in spring), then yes, they grow like weeds.  I've removed six 5 gallon
buckets full (about half) from my pond over the last month, just to
make some open space for lilies to grow.

In autumn after frost kills emergent plants, cabomba and anacharis
continue to grow underwater, well into early winter.  I think this helps
prevent the buildup of nutrients that leads to an algae bloom the next
spring.

Quote:
>what about watercress as floater in stock tank biofilter?

Excellent (as long as you don't let it block the water outlet!).
It grows like a weed, which all one can ask of a filter plant.
It seems to prefer cooler weather (spring, early summer).
One fresh bunch from the supermarket is all you need to get them
started.  The cut stems root readily.
- Rod