Brown spots on leaves?

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Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Sue Alexandr » Sat, 19 Jul 2003 03:42:05



I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching, lily buds, etc.  

Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda, but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves, (hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them causing that kind of damage.
Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Hank Page » Sat, 19 Jul 2003 06:51:32


It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)   I'm sorry
but could not resist.

IMO sounds like low iron.


  I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details and
specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will ring
a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and
everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching,
lily buds, etc.

  Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda, but
not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves,
(hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily
pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in
do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them
causing that kind of damage.
  Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Sue Alexandr » Sat, 19 Jul 2003 11:30:41


<-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)


  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)   I'm sorry but could not resist.

  IMO sounds like low iron.

    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching, lily buds, etc.  

    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda, but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves, (hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them causing that kind of damage.
    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Weldon Wallic » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 00:23:15


I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots, that is.

AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a little
too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what happens
- or doesn't happen.

I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

WLW

 On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

Quote:

><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)


>  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)   I'm sorry but could not resist.

>  IMO sounds like low iron.

>    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching, lily buds, etc.  

>    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda, but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves, (hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them causing that kind of damage.
>    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Sue Alexandr » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 11:19:47


I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing that is "new"
to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four years the pond
has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my plants.
Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like the brown
spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that haven't made it
to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't that hot.
Sue


Quote:
> I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots, that is.

> AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a little
> too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what happens
> - or doesn't happen.

> I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

> OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

> WLW

>  On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> ><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)




Quote:
> >  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)   I'm

sorry but could not resist.
Quote:

> >  IMO sounds like low iron.



Quote:
> >    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details

and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will
ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and
everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching,
lily buds, etc.
Quote:

> >    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda,

but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves,
(hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily
pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in
do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them
causing that kind of damage.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> >    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by john rut » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 11:48:32


Quote:

> I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing that is "new"
> to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four years the pond
> has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my plants.
> Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like the brown
> spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that haven't made it
> to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't that hot.
> Sue

I use potash in my pond quite often, I have a bag where the potash is in
  about 3/4x3/4 egg shaped chunks  I used t o figure one chunk per ounce
  but latly I have just grabbed 2-3 double handfulls roughly a quart of
these  and put em in the pond,,  Im guessing maybe  3-5 oz per 1000gal
and I havent seen any spots on any of my plants,  my ph runs about 8 - 8.5

                 John Rutz
                Z5  New Mexico

                never miss a good oportunity to shut up

                see my pond at:

                 http://www.fuerjefe.com

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Weldon Wallic » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 11:53:23


It must be the potash since you have made that change just this year.

I am trying to figure out why potash would cause such a problem. Found
the following info, FWIW:

Potassium/Potash (K): Potassium protects plants against stresses.
Potassium protects plants from cold winter temperatures and helps them
to resist invasion by pests such as weeds and insects. Potassium stops
wilting, helps roots stay in one place and assists in transferring
food. Potassium is a regulator. It activates plant enzymes and ensures
the plant uses water efficiently. Potassium is also responsible for
making sure the food you buy is fresh. Where does K come from? The
element potassium is seventh in order of abundance in the Earth's
crust. Through long-term natural processes K filters into the oceans
and seas. Over time, these bodies of water evaporate, leaving behind
mineral deposits. Although some of these deposits are covered with
several thousands of feet of earth, it is mined as potash or potassium
chloride. Potash ore may be used without complex chemical conversion;
just some processing is necessary to remove impurities such as common
salt.

Maybe we need an agronomist.

WLW

On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 22:19:47 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

Quote:

>I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing that is "new"
>to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four years the pond
>has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my plants.
>Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like the brown
>spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that haven't made it
>to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't that hot.
>Sue



>> I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots, that is.

>> AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a little
>> too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what happens
>> - or doesn't happen.

>> I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

>> OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

>> WLW

>>  On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

>> ><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)



>> >  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)   I'm
>sorry but could not resist.

>> >  IMO sounds like low iron.


>> >    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the details
>and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it will
>ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and
>everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching,
>lily buds, etc.

>> >    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking soda,
>but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants leaves,
>(hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the lily
>pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put in
>do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them
>causing that kind of damage.
>> >    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Sue Alexandr » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 22:18:09


Hi Weldon.  That was interesting info about potash, but you're right - it
still doesn't verify/explain why my leaves are getting brown spots.  I guess
we can chalk it up to that old saying "too much of anything is not good".
Potash sounds like it should be great for plants, but in excess it probably
has the opposite affect.  I am not very good at measuring, pretty relaxed
about it, actually, so I probably overdid it, thinking "if a little is good,
a lot should be great!"   Thanks for the info.
Sue


Quote:
> It must be the potash since you have made that change just this year.

> I am trying to figure out why potash would cause such a problem. Found
> the following info, FWIW:

> Potassium/Potash (K): Potassium protects plants against stresses.
> Potassium protects plants from cold winter temperatures and helps them
> to resist invasion by pests such as weeds and insects. Potassium stops
> wilting, helps roots stay in one place and assists in transferring
> food. Potassium is a regulator. It activates plant enzymes and ensures
> the plant uses water efficiently. Potassium is also responsible for
> making sure the food you buy is fresh. Where does K come from? The
> element potassium is seventh in order of abundance in the Earth's
> crust. Through long-term natural processes K filters into the oceans
> and seas. Over time, these bodies of water evaporate, leaving behind
> mineral deposits. Although some of these deposits are covered with
> several thousands of feet of earth, it is mined as potash or potassium
> chloride. Potash ore may be used without complex chemical conversion;
> just some processing is necessary to remove impurities such as common
> salt.

> Maybe we need an agronomist.

> WLW

> On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 22:19:47 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> >I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing that is
"new"
> >to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four years the
pond
> >has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my plants.
> >Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like the brown
> >spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that haven't made
it
> >to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't that hot.
> >Sue



> >> I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots, that is.

> >> AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a little
> >> too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what happens
> >> - or doesn't happen.

> >> I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

> >> OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

> >> WLW

> >>  On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> >> ><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)



> >> >  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house ;-)
I'm
> >sorry but could not resist.

> >> >  IMO sounds like low iron.


> >> >    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the
details
> >and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience it
will
> >ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth year, and
> >everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning, hatching,
> >lily buds, etc.

> >> >    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking
soda,
> >but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants
leaves,
> >(hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even the
lily
> >pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives I put
in
> >do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of them
> >causing that kind of damage.
> >> >    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Hank Page » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 22:18:36



Quote:
> I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing that
is "new"
> to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four years
the pond
> has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my
plants.
> Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like the
brown
> spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that haven't
made it
> to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't that
hot.
> Sue



> > I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots, that
is.

> > AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a
little
> > too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what
happens
> > - or doesn't happen.

> > I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

> > OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

> > WLW

> >  On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> > ><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)



> > >  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house
;-)   I'm
> sorry but could not resist.

> > >  IMO sounds like low iron.


> > >    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all the
details
> and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar experience
it will
> ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth
year, and
> everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning,
hatching,
> lily buds, etc.

> > >    Within the past week I have added some potash and some baking
soda,
> but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the plants
leaves,
> (hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them, even
the lily
> pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two additives
I put in
> do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of
them
> causing that kind of damage.
> > >    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Hank Page » Sun, 20 Jul 2003 22:29:06


Sue, All kidding aside. I don't use either potash or baking soda and
every year I get the same brown spots. Even on my marginals. My well
water has almost no iron in it. If I add iron spots do not return on
new foliage.


Quote:
> Hi Weldon.  That was interesting info about potash, but you're
right - it
> still doesn't verify/explain why my leaves are getting brown spots.
I guess
> we can chalk it up to that old saying "too much of anything is not
good".
> Potash sounds like it should be great for plants, but in excess it
probably
> has the opposite affect.  I am not very good at measuring, pretty
relaxed
> about it, actually, so I probably overdid it, thinking "if a little
is good,
> a lot should be great!"   Thanks for the info.
> Sue



> > It must be the potash since you have made that change just this
year.

> > I am trying to figure out why potash would cause such a problem.
Found
> > the following info, FWIW:

> > Potassium/Potash (K): Potassium protects plants against stresses.
> > Potassium protects plants from cold winter temperatures and helps
them
> > to resist invasion by pests such as weeds and insects. Potassium
stops
> > wilting, helps roots stay in one place and assists in transferring
> > food. Potassium is a regulator. It activates plant enzymes and
ensures
> > the plant uses water efficiently. Potassium is also responsible
for
> > making sure the food you buy is fresh. Where does K come from? The
> > element potassium is seventh in order of abundance in the Earth's
> > crust. Through long-term natural processes K filters into the
oceans
> > and seas. Over time, these bodies of water evaporate, leaving
behind
> > mineral deposits. Although some of these deposits are covered with
> > several thousands of feet of earth, it is mined as potash or
potassium
> > chloride. Potash ore may be used without complex chemical
conversion;
> > just some processing is necessary to remove impurities such as
common
> > salt.

> > Maybe we need an agronomist.

> > WLW

> > On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 22:19:47 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> > >I'm betting it's the potash, too, because it's the only thing
that is
> "new"
> > >to my pond.  I've been using baking soda for all of the four
years the
> pond
> > >has been in existence, but only this year tried potash to help my
plants.
> > >Guess it backfired on me.   And no, they don't look quite like
the brown
> > >spots you get from the heat, they're even on the leaves that
haven't made
> it
> > >to the surface of the water yet.   Besides, Connecticut isn't
that hot.
> > >Sue



> > >> I have seen the same thing in my small pond, the brown spots,
that is.

> > >> AND, I tend to think it comes from the use of potash - maybe a
little
> > >> too much - don't know. Gonna quit it for a while and see what
happens
> > >> - or doesn't happen.

> > >> I also use baking soda to keep the ph above the acid range.

> > >> OTOH, it may be related to the awful heat here in Florida.?

> > >> WLW

> > >>  On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 22:30:41 -0400, "Sue Alexandre"

> > >> ><-------- (grinning and shaking head over Hank's answer)



> > >> >  It may be time to put a new Sears catalogue in the out house
;-)
> I'm
> > >sorry but could not resist.

> > >> >  IMO sounds like low iron.


> > >> >    I know it will be hard for you to answer this without all
the
> details
> > >and specs of my pond, but maybe if you've had a similar
experience it
> will
> > >ring a bell with you.  I have a 4000 gallon pond in it's fourth
year, and
> > >everything is wonderful.  Clear water, healthy fish, spawning,
hatching,
> > >lily buds, etc.

> > >> >    Within the past week I have added some potash and some
baking
> soda,
> > >but not on the same day.    Today I noticed that a LOT of the
plants
> leaves,
> > >(hyacinth, lily pads) have lots of big brown patches on them,
even the
> lily
> > >pads that are still UNDER the water.   Did one of the two
additives I put
> in
> > >do this or is it just coincidence?     I can't imagine either of
them
> > >causing that kind of damage.
> > >> >    Sue

 
 
 

Brown spots on leaves?

Post by Weldon Wallic » Mon, 21 Jul 2003 12:21:52


In what form do you add "iron"?

Just thought, adding potash might be a problem with low iron. Such
things do happen with plants.

On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 09:29:06 -0400, "Hank Pagel"

Quote:

>Sue, All kidding aside. I don't use either potash or baking soda and
>every year I get the same brown spots. Even on my marginals. My well
>water has almost no iron in it. If I add iron spots do not return on
>new foliage.