Do your levels drop in the spring?

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Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by James Coo » Sun, 20 Apr 2003 20:30:08



I've only got a small nature pond (surface area around 90 sq ft - deep
section around 3 1/2 foot), no moving water, no mechanical filtration. I'm
in the south east of the UK and we've had a fairly dry 8 weeks, we've had a
hot few days (well, hot for here in April !) around 20-25 Celsius for the
last 3 days, its cooled off a bit today (12 degrees) and its gotten fairly
breezy overnight and today. I have noticed that the level has dropped about
10mm in the last 24 hrs. Would you consider this normal ? I do have lots of
grasses etc. growing on and invading the fringes of the pond if that makes
any difference.
 
 
 

Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by Harry Roger » Sun, 20 Apr 2003 22:16:55


I live in the same region as you and our pond has also lost a lot of
water.  Probably around 20mm over the same period as yours.   I'm not
an expert on ponds, but this happens quite a lot to ours during the
year. We just top it up from the tap and the fish survive OK.

The pond is about twic the size of yours and has a lot of plants in it
as well as about 35 fish (mainly goldfish).
--
Harry Rogers - guest user
------------------------------------------------------------------------
posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk

 
 
 

Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by jon » Mon, 21 Apr 2003 02:14:26


Both my ponds have done the same thing largest one is down 3/4 inch .

Jon

South Yorkshire

"James Cook"
r

Quote:

> I've only got a small nature pond (surface area around 90 sq ft - deep
> section around 3 1/2 foot), no moving water, no mechanical filtration. I'm
> in the south east of the UK and we've had a fairly dry 8 weeks, we've had
a
> hot few days (well, hot for here in April !) around 20-25 Celsius for the
> last 3 days, its cooled off a bit today (12 degrees) and its gotten fairly
> breezy overnight and today. I have noticed that the level has dropped
about
> 10mm in the last 24 hrs. Would you consider this normal ? I do have lots
of
> grasses etc. growing on and invading the fringes of the pond if that makes
> any difference.

 
 
 

Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by David W.E. Robert » Mon, 21 Apr 2003 20:06:35


We are is Suffolk and the levels always drop in the spring and summer.
We have a couple of water butts we use to top the pond up, and only use tap
water in major drought times.
Evapouration will always reduce water levels, especially if it is sunny and
breezy.
When levels are low I have been known to rush out in a downpour to start
siphoning water into the pond so that the new water running off the roof
into the water butts doesn't get lost :-)

"James Cook"
r

Quote:

> I've only got a small nature pond (surface area around 90 sq ft - deep
> section around 3 1/2 foot), no moving water, no mechanical filtration. I'm
> in the south east of the UK and we've had a fairly dry 8 weeks, we've had
a
> hot few days (well, hot for here in April !) around 20-25 Celsius for the
> last 3 days, its cooled off a bit today (12 degrees) and its gotten fairly
> breezy overnight and today. I have noticed that the level has dropped
about
> 10mm in the last 24 hrs. Would you consider this normal ? I do have lots
of
> grasses etc. growing on and invading the fringes of the pond if that makes
> any difference.

 
 
 

Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by James Coo » Tue, 22 Apr 2003 00:33:26




Quote:
> We are is Suffolk and the levels always drop in the spring and summer.
> We have a couple of water butts we use to top the pond up, and only use
tap
> water in major drought times.
> Evapouration will always reduce water levels, especially if it is sunny
and
> breezy.
> When levels are low I have been known to rush out in a downpour to start
> siphoning water into the pond so that the new water running off the roof
> into the water butts doesn't get lost :-)

Thanks for the responses guys (another 10mm or so lost in the 24 hrs - but
no panicking now). Interesting point about the rainwater though - I'm not
concerned about chlorine in tap water (as an aquarium owner I realise that
the concentrations going into my pond if I'm topping up will be negligible).
I did read once though that the real hazard of tap water is that it is good
food for algae - does anyone have any scientific proof for this ?
 
 
 

Do your levels drop in the spring?

Post by ~ ja » Wed, 07 May 2003 02:13:07


Quote:

>I did read once though that the real hazard of tap water is that it is good
>food for algae - does anyone have any scientific proof for this ?

Myth, tap water that is good enough for human consumption has less
nutrients in it than pond water. I believe Norm Meck talks about such in
one of his articles at:
http://www.koiclubsandiego.org/H2oQual.html
Perhaps the "Green Water" one or Water Change Outs.  

If it appears one is getting an algae bloom after a water change out, it is
because they are changing out too much at one time. ~ jan

See my ponds and filter design:
http://users.owt.com/jjspond/

        ~Keep 'em Wet!~
     Tri-Cities WA    Zone 7a
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