Parrot killings in Australia

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Parrot killings in Australia

Post by Lawrence Keet » Tue, 27 Feb 2001 23:28:06



I have heard that large numbers of birds that are supposed to be protected
species are being killed with the full sanction of the law in Australia. Is
this true and does anybody know anything more about this ?

Laurens

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by b.j.carte » Wed, 28 Feb 2001 00:30:59


Yes, it is true - you can read the full story on the following link.......

http://www.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/americas/02/14/crime.brazil.eggs.reut/i...
ml


Quote:
> I have heard that large numbers of birds that are supposed to be protected
> species are being killed with the full sanction of the law in Australia.
Is
> this true and does anybody know anything more about this ?

> Laurens

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by J. Nels » Wed, 28 Feb 2001 04:17:18


Quote:
>Is
>this true and does anybody know anything more about this ?

I've seen a thing on our PBS station where they were shooting Rose***ed Toos
that were destroying crops.  
Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
Frankie (MSC2)
Peaches (MOL2)
 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by Cbc » Wed, 28 Feb 2001 08:51:20


I know I inadvertently killed about 3 galahs (RoseBreated Toos??) one day
when
driving from Brisbane to Cunnamulla in Queensland.

Out in the sticks nearing the town of St George, I rounded a corner at
around 60 mph
and came upon a 100-150 strong flock of galahs and corellas eating the
spilled grain
from a truck on the roads edge.

Unfortunately it was a stinking hot day and given my car at the time only
had 4/60
air-conditioning it was a bit of a fiasco what happened next (4/60
air-conitioning is
4 windows wound down at 60 mph).

On top of them immediately they rose as one and I knew I had hit a bundle of
them.
To complicate matters as I was braking two managed in the confusion to fly
into the
car via the open windows.

All I can say is that I am glad there was no oncoming traffic as I was
covering my head
with my free arm from the e***d***y's and hence wobbling all over the
road to a
stop.  Talk about getting ones attention on a long boring bush drive, and
getting a
few more grey hairs!

I soon shoo'd them out and went and saw the damage.  Unfortunately 3 were
gone
and one was stunned (wandering aimlessly).  I picked it up and calmed it for
10 minutes
before it realised what the hell was going on, bit me and flew to its
raucous mates
hurling abuse at me from the trees above.

I felt bad about it but what could I have done?

To give you an insight to how the majority of Australians (bird lovers
excluded)
feel about them, most would not have stopped.

The majority know that in many places the***y's are a pest and given the
hardships
that farmers endure here (if it's not flood, it's drought), they have no
qualms about the
farmers killing them off to protect their crops.  To see hundreds of them
ravaging
the fields I'm sure would be heartbreaking (and we all know how destructive
they
can be).

The rainbow and scaly ***ed lourikeets (affectionately known as "bluey's
and
greenies") and rosellas are also in abundance though less of a pest (to me
they
are one of God's gifts to this country).  You won't see kangaroos in the
city but
you will see the rainbows.  Everywhere.  Ironic that these most beautifully
plumed birds can also be the most anti-social amongst themselves, not to
mention
the most raucous when the nectar begins to ferment in their bellies.
Occassionally
you will see a dead one beside a light pole.  Too drunk (on the nectar) to
fly.  No
joke.

To show you the level of apathy here toward our birdlife, what I have read
in this
ng is the first piece I have read or heard in years (including radio/tv).
It's just not
news here.

Sad but true.

Larry


Quote:
> >Is
> >this true and does anybody know anything more about this ?

> I've seen a thing on our PBS station where they were shooting Rose***ed
Toos
> that were destroying crops.
> Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
> Frankie (MSC2)
> Peaches (MOL2)

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by J. Nels » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 07:14:37


Quote:
>I know I inadvertently killed about 3 galahs (RoseBreated Toos??) one day
>when
>driving from Brisbane to Cunnamulla in Queensland.

Awww, how horrible for you.  At least you stopped.  I've always want a Galah,
but here in the good old US of A they cost about $1,600.
Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
Frankie (MSC2)
Peaches (MOL2)
 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by Cbc » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 07:41:22


For a galah??

Any wonder bird smuggling can appear so attractive to
unethical types.

Galahs are as common as mud here and rank lowly in the
***atoo species.  But like all***ies, in the right climate, they
are born entertainers, and can sit happily for hours amusing
themselves, and/or an audience with their antics.

By comparison, my Turquoise Parrots are introverted, though
slowly the male is beginning to respond to treats.


Quote:
> >I know I inadvertently killed about 3 galahs (RoseBreated Toos??) one day
> >when
> >driving from Brisbane to Cunnamulla in Queensland.

> Awww, how horrible for you.  At least you stopped.  I've always want a
Galah,
> but here in the good old US of A they cost about $1,600.
> Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
> Frankie (MSC2)
> Peaches (MOL2)

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by J. Nels » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 11:48:03


Quote:
>For a galah??

The last time I priced them with a breeder that's what they were going for.
Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
Frankie (MSC2)
Peaches (MOL2)
 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by Perth Australi » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 15:03:18


I live in Australia and have two Galahs. The Mature Female cost me $ 27.00
and the young bird at 9 weeks old cost $ 80.00. They are so common around
here everyone has them......

on a sad note, recently close to where we live someone poisoned some grain
and placed it in an area where a large flock of long billed corellas live.
In total I think 60 died, others were nursed back to health, the poison also
affected doves in the area. They still haven't found who did it yet.

Phil in Perth


Quote:
> >For a galah??

> The last time I priced them with a breeder that's what they were going
for.
> Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
> Frankie (MSC2)
> Peaches (MOL2)

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by David La » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 16:11:30


Hi Phil,

That is sad. Your message implies that "they" are looking for the culprits
which is a good sign because it means some people at least do care. Who is
"they" ? Did the matter get any press coverage ? Are long-billed corellas
protected birds ?

David


Quote:
>I live in Australia and have two Galahs. The Mature Female cost me $ 27.00
>and the young bird at 9 weeks old cost $ 80.00. They are so common around
>here everyone has them......

>on a sad note, recently close to where we live someone poisoned some grain
>and placed it in an area where a large flock of long billed corellas live.
>In total I think 60 died, others were nursed back to health, the poison
also
>affected doves in the area. They still haven't found who did it yet.

>Phil in Perth

 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by J. Nels » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 22:10:27


Quote:
>on a sad note, recently close to where we live someone poisoned some grain
>and placed it in an area where a large flock of long billed corellas live.

How sad...I sure hope they find out who did it.  I feel bad for the farmers who
are losing their crops, but we have the same problem around here with the crows
and other birds.
Jayne & Pepsi (CAG)
Frankie (MSC2)
Peaches (MOL2)
 
 
 

Parrot killings in Australia

Post by Laurens Keet » Fri, 02 Mar 2001 15:40:17


It's good that we should have a balanced view and try to see things from the
farmers' point of view as well. The original question though was
specifically about law changes in South Australia making it legal for vine
and fruit growers to kill certain birds even though the birds remain
protected species. Very odd to say the least. Some of the postings conjure
up the image of a poverty-stricken subsistence farmer struggling to feed his
family or perhaps his people.

The image is compelling but incorrect. Even Australian sources say that
there's too much wine being produced (Paul van der Lee, director of the
Australian Wine and Brandy Corp.,
http://www.winesandvines.com/frontpg_01_15_01_wineglut.html) partly due to a
spectacular additional vine planting of 35,000 hectares in the last 4 years.
Again, educated Australian sources say that the necessary clearance of
native vegetation that this involves actually has a negative effect on
agriculture (David C. Paton, Dept of Environmental Biology, University of
Adelaide, http://www.ccsa.asn.au/esa/birdpop.htm).

As a result, more wine is actually being made than the farmer's family or
his country can consume so it has to be exported to priority targets in
Britain, the United States,
Germany and Switzerland with anticipated growth of 12 to 19% (Paul van der
Lee again) but in Europe the EU already has a "wine lake" where according to
Mitchell Beaseley (http://www.reedbooks.co.uk/docs/mitchell/wine/wine1.htm)
people are producing more but drinking less.

What it all amounts to is the needless killing of beautiful creatures just
to swell the waters of a lake of surplus wine nobody wants to drink.

The one good thing is that there are plenty of environmentally conscious
Australians and this thing was started by an Australian newspaper. We should
be supporting them any way we can.

Laurens