killing parrots in Australia

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killing parrots in Australia

Post by Liz Evan » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 07:08:53



BJ,

I am not disagreeing, and if anyone thinks that I am supporting the current
method,
as I stated in an early post, I am not.  However, anytime you control or try to
control a population, you risk natural disease/disaster being the capper that
puts a species on CITES 1.  Even hormone use would put them in the same
position.

You're right, the birds were there first, but since when has that stopped man,
from even killing other men "that weren't like them, so expendable".

And I am also not saying don't put some pressure on the Australian gov to
re-evaluate their current methods, all I am saying, is to approach the
government
as an EDUCATED person with concerns regarding this Natural resource (the
birds);  Not as someone who is ONLY speaking with their heart and their
experience in companioning a couple of parrots.

Australia is actually one of the few countries that really is concerned about
their native wildlife, but they have to feed their people to. Hens the
dilemma. Donna's comment is well taken, but not practical to a continent that
is only (these figures may not be exact, because I'm not quoting from a book,
only
from memory) 3-5% able to support crops.

If this is the area in Aviculture that you feel strongly enough to REALLY try to

make a difference, then start an idea pool.  Do some research on your own, and
then put together a petition based on intelligent, grounded in the real world
ideas
and start addressing the Australian gov.  If someone can come up with an idea
that is truly viable for the wild birds, and the people of Australia, I'd be
happy
to sign the petition.

Believe me, I am on the side of the birds, and would start the research myself,
but my current gig for Aviculture is trying to stop PDD, and I do this on a
volunteer basis, so I have to do the work thing.  Maybe someone else would like
to do their bit by picking up this cause.

Best,

Liz

--
Have you made your contribution to the PDD research fund this year, 2001?
http://Grey_PoopOn.tripod.com
We need your money to save all of our fids from this horrible disease.
This year's challenge hasn't started yet, but your responsibility to your
companion can still be addressed today.
Don't let complacency stand between your loving feathered companion and
a test/vaccine that could save their lives.  Send your dollars today.

Quote:

> I know it is hard to see damage done by any wild animal when someone's
> livelihood is at stake.  BUT in the majority of cases the animals/birds were
> there first!

> While I don't condone letting flocks or herds get out of hand (after all we
> do need to eat too), I do feel that pressure put on Governments to end
> inhumane slaughter will eventually lead to more eco-friendly ways.  Yes, at
> the moment we have no way of controlling the breeding of these birds - BUT
> there must be some way to do it selectively, and it is research into this
> matter that I would like to see pushed.  After all, with the amount of gene
> typing and DNA breakthroughs lately someone should be able to come up with a
> satisfactory and humane way.

> What about the scenario where in five years time this legislation has had
> the desired effect of seriously reducing the flocks of different birds and
> species, and then a natural disease occurs to exert more devastation on the
> already depleted breeding birds?

 
 
 

killing parrots in Australia

Post by Feather Collecto » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 08:33:38


I realize it would take work to accomplish the goal using this method, but
at least it is an alternative. And besides, not everybody is afraid of
working. Solutions have to stem from ideas and that's all I'm offering; just
another way to look at the problem.

I certainly don't take offence to differing opinions and that's also a good
way to solve problems. I wish some kind of agency would take a look into it,
though, because I believe it could work and work well.

Angela

 
 
 

killing parrots in Australia

Post by b.j.carte » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 21:12:32


Liz,

Quote:
>Not as someone who is ONLY speaking with their heart and their
> experience in companioning a couple of parrots

Actually I work with a Parrot Charity, so although I may have only two
companion birds, I am actively trying to do something about captive bird
welfare.  I do feel very strongly about the abuse and neglect that some of
the birds in this county have to endure through greed, ignorance and profit.

Although I am a fairly well educated person, my 'area' is not science.  To
do what you suggest would need someone with at least a basic understanding
of animal physiology, and also chemistry.  My time too is taken up with my
main tasks of working, bringing up 3 kids on my own and helping out with the
running of the Charity for me to do more than make people aware of what is
going on, and HOPE that someone who understands the rudiments of scientific
research will come up with an idea.  With all the strides being made in
genetics and DNA research I don't think it is beyond the laws of probability
that something can be concocted which could be fed to a broad range of
parrot species but affect only the ones it is designed to.  If research
could come up with something that could effectively 'sterilise' the
hatchlings, without affecting the breeding pair, then used - say for example
once every 2/3 years or so, then this would not impact future generations by
giving us progressively older breeding stock.

Quote:
> BJ,

> I am not disagreeing, and if anyone thinks that I am supporting the
current
> method,
> as I stated in an early post, I am not.  However, anytime you control or
try to
> control a population, you risk natural disease/disaster being the capper
that
> puts a species on CITES 1.  Even hormone use would put them in the same
> position.

> You're right, the birds were there first, but since when has that stopped
man,
> from even killing other men "that weren't like them, so expendable".

> And I am also not saying don't put some pressure on the Australian gov to
> re-evaluate their current methods, all I am saying, is to approach the
> government
> as an EDUCATED person with concerns regarding this Natural resource (the
> birds);  Not as someone who is ONLY speaking with their heart and their
> experience in companioning a couple of parrots.

> Australia is actually one of the few countries that really is concerned
about
> their native wildlife, but they have to feed their people to. Hens the
> dilemma. Donna's comment is well taken, but not practical to a continent
that
> is only (these figures may not be exact, because I'm not quoting from a
book,
> only
> from memory) 3-5% able to support crops.

> If this is the area in Aviculture that you feel strongly enough to REALLY
try to

> make a difference, then start an idea pool.  Do some research on your own,
and
> then put together a petition based on intelligent, grounded in the real
world
> ideas
> and start addressing the Australian gov.  If someone can come up with an
idea
> that is truly viable for the wild birds, and the people of Australia, I'd
be
> happy
> to sign the petition.

> Believe me, I am on the side of the birds, and would start the research
myself,
> but my current gig for Aviculture is trying to stop PDD, and I do this on
a
> volunteer basis, so I have to do the work thing.  Maybe someone else would
like
> to do their bit by picking up this cause.

> Best,

> Liz

> --
> Have you made your contribution to the PDD research fund this year, 2001?
> http://Grey_PoopOn.tripod.com
> We need your money to save all of our fids from this horrible disease.
> This year's challenge hasn't started yet, but your responsibility to your
> companion can still be addressed today.
> Don't let complacency stand between your loving feathered companion and
> a test/vaccine that could save their lives.  Send your dollars today.


> > I know it is hard to see damage done by any wild animal when someone's
> > livelihood is at stake.  BUT in the majority of cases the animals/birds
were
> > there first!

> > While I don't condone letting flocks or herds get out of hand (after all
we
> > do need to eat too), I do feel that pressure put on Governments to end
> > inhumane slaughter will eventually lead to more eco-friendly ways.  Yes,
at
> > the moment we have no way of controlling the breeding of these birds -
BUT
> > there must be some way to do it selectively, and it is research into
this
> > matter that I would like to see pushed.  After all, with the amount of
gene
> > typing and DNA breakthroughs lately someone should be able to come up
with a
> > satisfactory and humane way.

> > What about the scenario where in five years time this legislation has
had
> > the desired effect of seriously reducing the flocks of different birds
and
> > species, and then a natural disease occurs to exert more devastation on
the
> > already depleted breeding birds?

 
 
 

killing parrots in Australia

Post by Liz Evan » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 23:16:48


BJ,

Actually, it sounds like you do have an idea to get someone else started.  And I

just want you to know that I was not inferring that anyone involved with this
thread was not educated.  I meant specifically educated on all the aspects of
this
specific situation.

You have obviously put some thought into a possible solution.  Unfortunately
many of the people who get involved in this kind of situation don't think it
through.  They just want it stopped because they want it stopped.  It offends
them
so it is wrong, and it is.  But, Governments don't generally listen to that kind
of
"logic".  They do listen to groups of people who want something stopped, but
can offer a viable or at the very least the start of what could be a viable
solution.

I applaud your work with abused parrots.  Our CAG, Pino came to us from an
abusive home, and I know the amount of work we have had bringing him back
to being a good Companion again.

I know that we have some Biologists/Science background, on this group, perhaps
one of them will pick up your idea and run with it.

Best,

Liz

Quote:

> Liz,

> >Not as someone who is ONLY speaking with their heart and their
> > experience in companioning a couple of parrots

> Actually I work with a Parrot Charity, so although I may have only two
> companion birds, I am actively trying to do something about captive bird
> welfare.  I do feel very strongly about the abuse and neglect that some of
> the birds in this county have to endure through greed, ignorance and profit.

> Although I am a fairly well educated person, my 'area' is not science.  To
> do what you suggest would need someone with at least a basic understanding
> of animal physiology, and also chemistry.  My time too is taken up with my
> main tasks of working, bringing up 3 kids on my own and helping out with the
> running of the Charity for me to do more than make people aware of what is
> going on, and HOPE that someone who understands the rudiments of scientific
> research will come up with an idea.  With all the strides being made in
> genetics and DNA research I don't think it is beyond the laws of probability
> that something can be concocted which could be fed to a broad range of
> parrot species but affect only the ones it is designed to.  If research
> could come up with something that could effectively 'sterilise' the
> hatchlings, without affecting the breeding pair, then used - say for example
> once every 2/3 years or so, then this would not impact future generations by
> giving us progressively older breeding stock.


> > BJ,

> > I am not disagreeing, and if anyone thinks that I am supporting the
> current
> > method,
> > as I stated in an early post, I am not.  However, anytime you control or
> try to
> > control a population, you risk natural disease/disaster being the capper
> that
> > puts a species on CITES 1.  Even hormone use would put them in the same
> > position.

> > You're right, the birds were there first, but since when has that stopped
> man,
> > from even killing other men "that weren't like them, so expendable".

> > And I am also not saying don't put some pressure on the Australian gov to
> > re-evaluate their current methods, all I am saying, is to approach the
> > government
> > as an EDUCATED person with concerns regarding this Natural resource (the
> > birds);  Not as someone who is ONLY speaking with their heart and their
> > experience in companioning a couple of parrots.

> > Australia is actually one of the few countries that really is concerned
> about
> > their native wildlife, but they have to feed their people to. Hens the
> > dilemma. Donna's comment is well taken, but not practical to a continent
> that
> > is only (these figures may not be exact, because I'm not quoting from a
> book,
> > only
> > from memory) 3-5% able to support crops.

> > If this is the area in Aviculture that you feel strongly enough to REALLY
> try to

> > make a difference, then start an idea pool.  Do some research on your own,
> and
> > then put together a petition based on intelligent, grounded in the real
> world
> > ideas
> > and start addressing the Australian gov.  If someone can come up with an
> idea
> > that is truly viable for the wild birds, and the people of Australia, I'd
> be
> > happy
> > to sign the petition.

> > Believe me, I am on the side of the birds, and would start the research
> myself,
> > but my current gig for Aviculture is trying to stop PDD, and I do this on
> a
> > volunteer basis, so I have to do the work thing.  Maybe someone else would
> like
> > to do their bit by picking up this cause.

> > Best,

> > Liz

> > --
> > Have you made your contribution to the PDD research fund this year, 2001?
> > http://Grey_PoopOn.tripod.com
> > We need your money to save all of our fids from this horrible disease.
> > This year's challenge hasn't started yet, but your responsibility to your
> > companion can still be addressed today.
> > Don't let complacency stand between your loving feathered companion and
> > a test/vaccine that could save their lives.  Send your dollars today.


> > > I know it is hard to see damage done by any wild animal when someone's
> > > livelihood is at stake.  BUT in the majority of cases the animals/birds
> were
> > > there first!

> > > While I don't condone letting flocks or herds get out of hand (after all
> we
> > > do need to eat too), I do feel that pressure put on Governments to end
> > > inhumane slaughter will eventually lead to more eco-friendly ways.  Yes,
> at
> > > the moment we have no way of controlling the breeding of these birds -
> BUT
> > > there must be some way to do it selectively, and it is research into
> this
> > > matter that I would like to see pushed.  After all, with the amount of
> gene
> > > typing and DNA breakthroughs lately someone should be able to come up
> with a
> > > satisfactory and humane way.

> > > What about the scenario where in five years time this legislation has
> had
> > > the desired effect of seriously reducing the flocks of different birds
> and
> > > species, and then a natural disease occurs to exert more devastation on
> the
> > > already depleted breeding birds?

--
Have you made your contribution to the PDD research fund this year, 2001?
http://Grey_PoopOn.tripod.com
We need your money to save all of our fids from this horrible disease.
This year's challenge hasn't started yet, but your responsibility to your
companion can still be addressed today.
Don't let complacency stand between your loving feathered companion and
a test/vaccine that could save their lives.  Send your dollars today.