ONE EYED PIGS?

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ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by Laura Newberr » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 17:38:11



Hello all.
Has anyone got any experience of piggies having to have an eye removed? Moe
has had an infection which hasnt cleared up and the vet wants to remove her
eye because theres too much damage been done. How do piggies manage with one
eye? How do piggies manage with operations - isnt it dangerous having such a
small animal knocked out? Is eye removal quite an easy operation? I seem to
remember its not as difficult because its all there close to the surface -
you dont have to be opened up.
If you have any info etc, please could you email me. Thank you.
 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by cinnamonc.. » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 18:58:59


Hi Laura,
  I have a blind guinea pig and he manages just fine.  We don't move
things around in his habitat and he has a seeing guinea pig which
keeps him company!  He seems much happier with the seeing guinea pig
in there with him.

Regards,
Carolyn



Quote:
> Hello all.
> Has anyone got any experience of piggies having to have an eye
removed? Moe
> has had an infection which hasnt cleared up and the vet wants to
remove her
> eye because theres too much damage been done. How do piggies manage
with one
> eye? How do piggies manage with operations - isnt it dangerous having
such a
> small animal knocked out? Is eye removal quite an easy operation? I
seem to
> remember its not as difficult because its all there close to the
surface -
> you dont have to be opened up.
> If you have any info etc, please could you email me. Thank you.

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ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by Laura Newberr » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 22:01:12


Thank you, thats calmed my nerves a little! Did your pig have its eyes
removed or was it always blind? The bit I'm worried about is the operation -
her being knocked out for it, as I have heard that small animals dont always
do well with anasthetic (sp?)
I used to ride a horse with one eye, and he was fine most of the time except
when he was going fast he used to go sideways so he could see better. Very
hairy, especially over jumps when you are used to going forwards!!
 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by cinnamonc.. » Mon, 25 Dec 2000 22:33:47




Quote:
> Thank you, thats calmed my nerves a little!

    Glad to do that :0)

Quote:
> Did your pig have its eyes
> removed or was it always blind?

     He has both of his eyes and has some very partial eyesight. From
a number of tests he went through last month, we learned that he's
always been blind.

Quote:
> The bit I'm worried about is the

operation -

    Is the operation necessary?

Quote:
> her being knocked out for it, as I have heard that small animals dont
always
> do well with anasthetic (sp?)

    That's right.  It's a high risk when you put a guinea pig under.

Regards,
Carolyn

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http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by Laura Newberr » Tue, 26 Dec 2000 02:55:34


Quote:
>>> The bit I'm worried about is the

operation -

    Is the operation necessary?

Well, the vet seemed to think so because the eye has an infection in it. If
the eye is removed because we cant get the infection under control it will
stop it spreading any further.
My last vet wouldnt even neuter Roger Pig because he didnt like to have such
a small animal knocked out without it being essential, but this is a new
vet. (I have a different vet for my horses than for my small animals -
whereas the horse surgery have small animal vets too, the small vet surgery
dont do horses. So when I called up the small animal vets for an emergency
appointment yesterday they wouldnt even let me speak to a vet for advice.
But the other vets stayed open longer so I could get there in time. My horse
vet popped in to say hi, but I made sure I saw a small animal vet who knew
pigs) Thats a long winded and drunken explanation if ever there was one.
Sorry!
HAVE A LOVELY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!!

 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by jmous » Tue, 26 Dec 2000 06:51:21


Hi Laura,

Regarding your piggy,

Piggies are different to put under anesthetic, not hard.

They have very large lung capacity due to their act dead
routine for predators. They can go without breathing for
maybe ten minutes or so.
They also have very high tolerance to *** used as analgesics
and sedatives. These aspects can be used to advantage if known.

If unknown then piggies can hold their breaths and then take great gasps
and can take to much anesthetic in a short time.
This can easily be dealt with by giving a lower concentration and
watching the patient.

Eye oblation can be done with local anesthetics as well as light
general anesthetics, it is not difficult surgery, for instance
it does not involve large *** vessels, the eye can be
"popped out" and the optic nerve is then cut along with some
*** vessels, the eye is removed whole.

There is a possibility of a sympathetic response causing the
loss of site in the other eye, this is very low and is not
understood. It is the same with humans, the chances are very
low, maybe one in one hundred thousand.
If your vet has experience with piggy anesthetics then every
thing should be fine.

You may want to investigate why and how it became infected.

He will loose his ability to judge distances though they have
other senses that will help alleviate the situation.

I have a totally blind piggy (six years) and he has no problems
at all, he makes better use of his other senses. I would not put
a blind piggy out where he may have to be careful of the neighbor's cat
though.

Your piggy should live a long life and if his eye is infected
then he will be better off without it.

If you have any queries you are welcome to email me.

    best wishes, jmouse

 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by jmous » Tue, 26 Dec 2000 17:36:01


Hi Laura,

Sorry if you have received this, my ISP timed out as I
sent it to you.

Regarding your piggy,

Piggies are different to put under anesthetic, not hard.

They have very large lung capacity due to their act dead
routine for predators. They can go without breathing for
maybe ten minutes or so.
They also have very high tolerance to *** used as analgesics
and sedatives. These aspects can be used to advantage if known.

If unknown then piggies can hold their breaths and then take great gasps
and can take to much anesthetic in a short time.
This can easily be dealt with by giving a lower concentration and
watching the patient.

Eye oblation can be done with local anesthetics as well as light
general anesthetics, it is not difficult surgery, for instance
it does not involve large *** vessels, the eye can be
"popped out" and the optic nerve is then cut along with some
*** vessels, the eye is removed whole.

There is a possibility of a sympathetic response causing the
loss of site in the other eye, this is very low and is not
understood. It is the same with humans, the chances are very
low, maybe one in one hundred thousand.
If your vet has experience with piggy anesthetics then every
thing should be fine.

You may want to investigate why and how it became infected.

He will loose his ability to judge distances though they have
other senses that will help alleviate the situation.

I have a totally blind piggy (six years) and he has no problems
at all, he makes better use of his other senses. I would not put
a blind piggy out where he may have to be careful of the neighbor's cat
though.

Your piggy should live a long life and if his eye is infected
then he will be better off without it.

If you have any queries you are welcome to email me.

    best wishes, jmouse

 
 
 

ONE EYED PIGS?

Post by CaSandr » Wed, 27 Dec 2000 07:04:16


hi there.. i'm not sure about one eyed piggies but i rescued a sow that was
born with NO EYES! she seemed to get along well with others, had had at
least one litter ( i have her daughter also), and even had a cagemate that
she lived with.  i was told that none of her litter were born with eye
problems -or lack of eyes as the case was- unfortunatley  she passed shortly
after i got her (by the way she had been vet checked and was given a good
bill of health) Happy holidays to all! CaSandra

Quote:

> Hi Laura,

> Regarding your piggy,

> Piggies are different to put under anesthetic, not hard.

> They have very large lung capacity due to their act dead
> routine for predators. They can go without breathing for
> maybe ten minutes or so.
> They also have very high tolerance to *** used as analgesics
> and sedatives. These aspects can be used to advantage if known.

> If unknown then piggies can hold their breaths and then take great gasps
> and can take to much anesthetic in a short time.
> This can easily be dealt with by giving a lower concentration and
> watching the patient.

> Eye oblation can be done with local anesthetics as well as light
> general anesthetics, it is not difficult surgery, for instance
> it does not involve large *** vessels, the eye can be
> "popped out" and the optic nerve is then cut along with some
> *** vessels, the eye is removed whole.

> There is a possibility of a sympathetic response causing the
> loss of site in the other eye, this is very low and is not
> understood. It is the same with humans, the chances are very
> low, maybe one in one hundred thousand.
> If your vet has experience with piggy anesthetics then every
> thing should be fine.

> You may want to investigate why and how it became infected.

> He will loose his ability to judge distances though they have
> other senses that will help alleviate the situation.

> I have a totally blind piggy (six years) and he has no problems
> at all, he makes better use of his other senses. I would not put
> a blind piggy out where he may have to be careful of the neighbor's cat
> though.

> Your piggy should live a long life and if his eye is infected
> then he will be better off without it.

> If you have any queries you are welcome to email me.

>     best wishes, jmouse