Keeping a white ferret white?

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Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Angelina Marti » Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:00:00



I saw a post here a couple of weeks ago about this topic, but I can't find
it now so I'm afraid that I'm going to have to annoy everybody by asking
the question again (sorry!) : how can I keep my little albino, Tickles,
white (or at least not yellow)?  Are there any special products, diets or
home remedies?  Please please reply 'coz I want her to look at pretty as
possible!

Thanks
--
Angelina and Taz, Badger and Tickles

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Star & Tro » Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Diet can have some effect on it, I'm sure, but I don't know for sure in what
way,
or what particular aspect of the diet causes it. Mine are on a good diet of
Iams
and Eukanuba, but it still happens.
I use Sheppard & Greene Silver Sheen shampoo on all 3 of my ferts -
albino and sable alike. They also make a Sable Sheen, but it seemed like
too much the same to spend another $8 on it. I have used it on my guys
twice now since I bought it a few months ago, and it has made a vast
improvement
on Boo's yellow ***;) It has a great smell, and leaves their fur so soft
and fluffy.

Star

Quote:

>I saw a post here a couple of weeks ago about this topic, but I can't find
>it now so I'm afraid that I'm going to have to annoy everybody by asking
>the question again (sorry!) : how can I keep my little albino, Tickles,
>white (or at least not yellow)?  Are there any special products, diets or
>home remedies?  Please please reply 'coz I want her to look at pretty as
>possible!

>Thanks
>--
>Angelina and Taz, Badger and Tickles


 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Lesa-Mari » Sun, 04 Apr 1999 04:00:00


I have not owned a white ferret, but I was also curious so I did a bit of
web searching...came up empty-handed.

Instead I shall throw in my biology and chemistry degrees on a wild goose
chase.  A vet may know the answer.  I have two ideas.

First, a friend of mine owns two white dogs.  The reason why she has trouble
keeping them white is because of their saliva.  Their saliva from constant
itching they have from a skin condition turns their fur red.  Looks
terrible.  I doubted this, but this is what her vet said.  I thought it
might be from all the fleas the dogs had.  If you wet flea feces, the ***
will discolor the same way.  But if it is saliva, that might cause fur to
turn different shades depending upon the pH of the saliva.  That could make
it diet related, but ferret and kitten foods should not be a problem

My other idea has to to with the fur growth itself.  I have yet to see a
photo of a very old ferret with stark white fur.  Maybe they are out there.
However, if they are not, it may be because as they get older, their fur
tends to grow out with what appears to be yellow, but is actually a very
pale version of a brown shade.  Some humans go grey, some go white, some not
at all, and almost all blonds go darker as they get older.

I have a black sable and a champagne.  As my sable has matured (almost 2
now), her fur has changed to include a more silvery sheen.  Her points
remain very black.  My champagne (almost 1 year) has developed a slight
yellowish tinge to some fur around her shoulder area but not on the points.
Since they eat the same food and sleep in the same hammock, I can't see that
it is diet or cleanliness.  Otherwise, my sable's silvers and white bib and
mask parts would not look so bright white.  Before I started writing this, I
took a closer look at my champagne's fur and I am convinced that although it
*could* appear to have a yellowish tinge, it may really be a hue of light
brown.  Indoor lighting will make everything look very yellow.

Now, after this lengthy dissertation, I have to say this is really more of a
guess.  I never studied ferrets but saw many large white lab rats studied
for old age.  All the young ones were white, while *all* the elderly were
yellowish.  Probably a well-informed vet could have saved my boring essay
with a two minute answer. hehe
Ah well, I tried.   :)  Today was a boring day.  *snicker*

I *was* going to make one real point here, though, and that is that if I
owned a white ferret, I would try very hard not to bathe it more often than
I would bathe a dark ferret.  I could see the temptation to keep it looking
like perfect snow, but it probably would not be good for the skin.

Hugs to everyone's fuzzies of every color!

Lesa-Marie

Quote:

>I saw a post here a couple of weeks ago about this topic, but I can't find
>it now so I'm afraid that I'm going to have to annoy everybody by asking
>the question again (sorry!) : how can I keep my little albino, Tickles,
>white (or at least not yellow)?  Are there any special products, diets or
>home remedies?  Please please reply 'coz I want her to look at pretty as
>possible!

>Thanks
>--
>Angelina and Taz, Badger and Tickles


 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Kat Richards » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


OK, this goes back to when I was young and foolish and hung out with
hairdressers, but, in humans, that yellow color is caused by oil deposits
and Ph balance (or imbalance) between hair and scalp oils. Folks with
white, platinum or silver hair, or light bleached blonds, often have
trouble keeping their hair lovely, so cosmetic science has a solution:
color corrector/enhancer. A purple enhancer is added to ordinary
shampoo or rinse to eliminate yellow tones. A blue one is used for
killing off orange or "brassy" tones. If your ferret shampoo is lavender
or purple it contains the yellow-killing enhancer.

You can buy just the enhancer at a beauty supply and add 1 to 2 drops to
ordinary ferret shampoo as you are about to use it. Don't use too much or you
end up with a purple ferret. Don't treat the whole bottle. A small bottle will
last a human who washes their hair every day about a month. Imagine how long
it will last a ferret?

Can you guess what color my hair is?

On Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:11:09 GMT,

 brought forth the following words...:

Quote:
>I have not owned a white ferret, but I was also curious so I did a bit of
>web searching...came up empty-handed.

>Instead I shall throw in my biology and chemistry degrees on a wild goose
>chase.  A vet may know the answer.  I have two ideas.

>First, a friend of mine owns two white dogs.  The reason why she has trouble
>keeping them white is because of their saliva.  Their saliva from constant
>itching they have from a skin condition turns their fur red.  Looks
>terrible.  I doubted this, but this is what her vet said.  I thought it
>might be from all the fleas the dogs had.  If you wet flea feces, the ***
>will discolor the same way.  But if it is saliva, that might cause fur to
>turn different shades depending upon the pH of the saliva.  That could make
>it diet related, but ferret and kitten foods should not be a problem

>My other idea has to to with the fur growth itself.  I have yet to see a
>photo of a very old ferret with stark white fur.  Maybe they are out there.
>However, if they are not, it may be because as they get older, their fur
>tends to grow out with what appears to be yellow, but is actually a very
>pale version of a brown shade.  Some humans go grey, some go white, some not
>at all, and almost all blonds go darker as they get older.

>I have a black sable and a champagne.  As my sable has matured (almost 2
>now), her fur has changed to include a more silvery sheen.  Her points
>remain very black.  My champagne (almost 1 year) has developed a slight
>yellowish tinge to some fur around her shoulder area but not on the points.
>Since they eat the same food and sleep in the same hammock, I can't see that
>it is diet or cleanliness.  Otherwise, my sable's silvers and white bib and
>mask parts would not look so bright white.  Before I started writing this, I
>took a closer look at my champagne's fur and I am convinced that although it
>*could* appear to have a yellowish tinge, it may really be a hue of light
>brown.  Indoor lighting will make everything look very yellow.

>Now, after this lengthy dissertation, I have to say this is really more of a
>guess.  I never studied ferrets but saw many large white lab rats studied
>for old age.  All the young ones were white, while *all* the elderly were
>yellowish.  Probably a well-informed vet could have saved my boring essay
>with a two minute answer. hehe
>Ah well, I tried.   :)  Today was a boring day.  *snicker*

>I *was* going to make one real point here, though, and that is that if I
>owned a white ferret, I would try very hard not to bathe it more often than
>I would bathe a dark ferret.  I could see the temptation to keep it looking
>like perfect snow, but it probably would not be good for the skin.

>Hugs to everyone's fuzzies of every color!

>Lesa-Marie


>>I saw a post here a couple of weeks ago about this topic, but I can't find
>>it now so I'm afraid that I'm going to have to annoy everybody by asking
>>the question again (sorry!) : how can I keep my little albino, Tickles,
>>white (or at least not yellow)?  Are there any special products, diets or
>>home remedies?  Please please reply 'coz I want her to look at pretty as
>>possible!

>>Thanks
>>--
>>Angelina and Taz, Badger and Tickles


--
Kat Richardson
"Mmmm, shoe leather, my favorite."
 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Marc S » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


arrrghhhh....
keeping an animal white with chemicals ????
Why dont ya just try stop feeding things that makes the fur yellow ?
stop feed carotine should help.

greetinzz marc

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by T. Rab » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


after reading this....is it THAT important that someone has a 'perfect'
white ferret...nothing is worth using chemicals as such mentioned on a
ferret....... my two albinos and one black eyed white all vary in shades of
white/yellow and i love 'em the color they are....

trish
mom of many

Quote:

>OK, this goes back to when I was young and foolish and hung out with
>hairdressers, but, in humans, that yellow color is caused by oil deposits
>and Ph balance (or imbalance) between hair and scalp oils. Folks with
>white, platinum or silver hair, or light bleached blonds, often have
>trouble keeping their hair lovely, so cosmetic science has a solution:
>color corrector/enhancer. A purple enhancer is added to ordinary
>shampoo or rinse to eliminate yellow tones. A blue one is used for
>killing off orange or "brassy" tones. If your ferret shampoo is lavender
>or purple it contains the yellow-killing enhancer.

>You can buy just the enhancer at a beauty supply and add 1 to 2 drops to
>ordinary ferret shampoo as you are about to use it. Don't use too much or
you
>end up with a purple ferret. Don't treat the whole bottle. A small bottle
will
>last a human who washes their hair every day about a month. Imagine how
long
>it will last a ferret?

>Can you guess what color my hair is?

>On Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:11:09 GMT,

> brought forth the following words...:

>>I have not owned a white ferret, but I was also curious so I did a bit of
>>web searching...came up empty-handed.

>>Instead I shall throw in my biology and chemistry degrees on a wild goose
>>chase.  A vet may know the answer.  I have two ideas.

>>First, a friend of mine owns two white dogs.  The reason why she has
trouble
>>keeping them white is because of their saliva.  Their saliva from constant
>>itching they have from a skin condition turns their fur red.  Looks
>>terrible.  I doubted this, but this is what her vet said.  I thought it
>>might be from all the fleas the dogs had.  If you wet flea feces, the
***
>>will discolor the same way.  But if it is saliva, that might cause fur to
>>turn different shades depending upon the pH of the saliva.  That could
make
>>it diet related, but ferret and kitten foods should not be a problem

>>My other idea has to to with the fur growth itself.  I have yet to see a
>>photo of a very old ferret with stark white fur.  Maybe they are out
there.
>>However, if they are not, it may be because as they get older, their fur
>>tends to grow out with what appears to be yellow, but is actually a very
>>pale version of a brown shade.  Some humans go grey, some go white, some
not
>>at all, and almost all blonds go darker as they get older.

>>I have a black sable and a champagne.  As my sable has matured (almost 2
>>now), her fur has changed to include a more silvery sheen.  Her points
>>remain very black.  My champagne (almost 1 year) has developed a slight
>>yellowish tinge to some fur around her shoulder area but not on the
points.
>>Since they eat the same food and sleep in the same hammock, I can't see
that
>>it is diet or cleanliness.  Otherwise, my sable's silvers and white bib
and
>>mask parts would not look so bright white.  Before I started writing this,
I
>>took a closer look at my champagne's fur and I am convinced that although
it
>>*could* appear to have a yellowish tinge, it may really be a hue of light
>>brown.  Indoor lighting will make everything look very yellow.

>>Now, after this lengthy dissertation, I have to say this is really more of
a
>>guess.  I never studied ferrets but saw many large white lab rats studied
>>for old age.  All the young ones were white, while *all* the elderly were
>>yellowish.  Probably a well-informed vet could have saved my boring essay
>>with a two minute answer. hehe
>>Ah well, I tried.   :)  Today was a boring day.  *snicker*

>>I *was* going to make one real point here, though, and that is that if I
>>owned a white ferret, I would try very hard not to bathe it more often
than
>>I would bathe a dark ferret.  I could see the temptation to keep it
looking
>>like perfect snow, but it probably would not be good for the skin.

>>Hugs to everyone's fuzzies of every color!

>>Lesa-Marie


>>>I saw a post here a couple of weeks ago about this topic, but I can't
find
>>>it now so I'm afraid that I'm going to have to annoy everybody by asking
>>>the question again (sorry!) : how can I keep my little albino, Tickles,
>>>white (or at least not yellow)?  Are there any special products, diets or
>>>home remedies?  Please please reply 'coz I want her to look at pretty as
>>>possible!

>>>Thanks
>>>--
>>>Angelina and Taz, Badger and Tickles

>--
>Kat Richardson
>"Mmmm, shoe leather, my favorite."

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by T. Rab » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


Quote:
>You can buy just the enhancer at a beauty supply and add 1 to 2drops

to>ordinary ferret shampoo as you are about to use it. Don't use too much or
you>end up with a purple ferret. Don't treat the whole bottle. A small
bottle will>last a human who washes their hair every day about a month.
Imagine how long >it will last a ferret?

   im wondering also on the 'real' safeness of using a human product as such
mentioned on a ferret.....
anyone know this?....

trish
mom of many

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Lesa-Mari » Tue, 06 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Sorry, but I have to go with T. Rabe on this.  Maybe when you buy a white
ferret, you are really buying a yellow one and you have to learn to live
with it.  I can't imagine bleaching an animal.  Yes, humans do it, but at
least we get the option to decide for ourselves, and are not so likely to
get a mouthful or get it in our eyes while putting it on either.

Just remember, if you use a chemical on your pet that has not been tested on
animals, YOU are doing animal testing on your own pet.

Hugs all

Lesa-Marie

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Elwin Bulla » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>after reading this....is it THAT important that someone has a 'perfect'
>white ferret...nothing is worth using chemicals as such mentioned on a
>ferret....... my two albinos and one black eyed white all vary in shades of
>white/yellow and i love 'em the color they are....

>trish
>mom of many

I tend to agree.  My DEW, Saffy, has developed a yellowish tail this
year.  In fact even as a baby she had a yellow tinge depending on what
light she was in.  My Blk. Roan Mitt, O'possum Flower has a yellowish
almost buttercup yellow in her under fur that is just gorgeous.  

 I wonder if white ferrets get their color from the same place a polar
bear does?  I.E. clear hollow hairs that reflect light.

I mean would you use chemicals on a human baby to change hair color?
----------------------------------------------------------
Elwin and Mike
Ferrets: Ootz, Possum, Doris, Saffy, and eternally Winnie
Sugar Gliders: Myra(+2 OOP) and Myron and Patsy, Edina, Grizzly and Addams,
Gizmo and Rusty +2 OOP, their first.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
We currently have twin males for sale, just out of pocket.
Email me for details.
www.texasintertainment.com/glideradopt

Wanna buy a glider?

 
 
 

Keeping a white ferret white?

Post by Kat Richards » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00


On Sun, 4 Apr 1999 21:44:00 -0400,

 brought forth the following words...:

Quote:

>>You can buy just the enhancer at a beauty supply and add 1 to 2drops
>to>ordinary ferret shampoo as you are about to use it. Don't use too much or
>you>end up with a purple ferret. Don't treat the whole bottle. A small
>bottle will>last a human who washes their hair every day about a month.
>Imagine how long >it will last a ferret?

>   im wondering also on the 'real' safeness of using a human product as such
>mentioned on a ferret.....
>anyone know this?....

>trish
>mom of many

To the best of my knowledge, this is _ the_ exact_ same_ chemical that is used
to color enhance ferret shampoos as well as human shampoos. It is not a dye.
What it does is "mask" the yellow or orange tone by "cancelling out" the color
of light waves reflected with a complimentary color, producing white light
reflections. That's why we see white in the first place. It does not stay on the
hair. Quite likley, some ferrets are allergic to it, just like some humans.
If your fuzzy is itchy after a bath with "Silver Sheen" it's probably the
color enhancer that caused it, or over drying of the skin.

 I only offered this information FYI and for those who have a shampoo they
like but are considering the "Icky yellow fur" problem. There is a way to test
if you're worried about any product on your fuzzy's skin: Put a drop or less on
pointy bit of one back "heel" of your critter. It's not extremly sensitive,
but will turn red and itchy if the critter is allergic. If they itch, wash it
immediately and soothe the skin with appropriate cream or whatever. Don't leave
the color stuff on the critter for more than 15 to 20 seconds in any case. And
don't let them*** anything you are testing for allergy reactions.

You can also try it behind your own ear first. Believe me, if it's even a little
bit ***, you'll know in a hurry. And do bear in mind that testing for human
saftey is much more stringent than the standards to which the producers of
pet products are held. Unfortunately.

--
Kat Richardson
"Mmmm, shoe leather, my favorite."