Chevrons?

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Chevrons?

Post by JLind406 » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00



Hi,

Any advice on keeping Chevrons? I have a Mexican True Red Leg and a Mexican Red
Knee but have no experience of Chevrons.

Any advice welcomed,

Jim

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by 3.. » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


Hi Jim

Chevrons are tropical arboreal tarantulas, they need vertical space with a piece of
cork bark or similar in which they will construct their hiding place. The humidity
for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a pothos plant, they
will build a web among the leaves. A substrate of potting soil and vermiculite kept
damp will help with the humidity as will covering part of the cage with plastic.
Although they are New World spiders their temperament is reported to be like that
of Poicilotheria, in other words do not handle them .
Thea

Quote:

> Hi,

> Any advice on keeping Chevrons? I have a Mexican True Red Leg and a Mexican Red
> Knee but have no experience of Chevrons.

> Any advice welcomed,

> Jim

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by JLind406 » Mon, 05 Apr 1999 05:00:00


Quote:
>Chevrons are tropical arboreal tarantulas, they need vertical space with a
>piece of
>cork bark or similar in which they will construct their hiding place. The
>humidity
>for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a pothos plant,
>they
>will build a web among the leaves. A substrate of potting soil and
>vermiculite kept
>damp will help with the humidity as will covering part of the cage with
>plastic.
>Although they are New World spiders their temperament is reported to be like
>that
>of Poicilotheria, in other words do not handle them .

Thanks Thea!
 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by Jesse Kelle » Tue, 06 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> >> The
> > >humidity
> > >for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a

<snip snip>

Quote:
> no no no they do real bad at that high of a humidity! keep them at
> 55%-60% with a water dish available at all times and mist ever two to 3

<snip snip>

Quote:
> > I've maintained hundreds of arboreals in captivity and only raise the humidity during pre-molt, molt, and 3 days post molt then, I raise it from 70% to 75% to a maximum high of 80%.

<snippity snip>

Okay, my question is (and I've asked this before and gotten no answer <hmph!>) HOW do you determine the humidity so precisely?  Is there some kinda thing you can buy that does it, or do you have to just .. know these things somehow? :).  Any info would be appreciated..

            Jesse.

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by Mike » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>> The
> >humidity
> >for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a

> Thanks Thea!

no no no they do real bad at that high of a humidity! keep them at
55%-60% with a water dish available at all times and mist ever two to 3
weeks. we reciently had a discussion on cambridgei due to the fact so
many of us were haveing poor luck and this is what Luc Ross had to
say...

Quote:
> To All,

> The problem that keeps rearing its ugly head is the misinformation from the past that arboreals need high humidity, sweltering hot environments to thrive. If you want to guarantee unhealthy arboreals that may well perish, then, follow this advice!
> Humidity is necessary for all tarantula species including those from xeric environments such as many African and Mexican species but, when it comes to arboreals, its the airflow and ventilation that is the important factor in maintaining healthy specimens in captivity.
> I've maintained hundreds of arboreals in captivity and only raise the humidity during pre-molt, molt, and 3 days post molt then, I raise it from 70% to 75% to a maximum high of 80%.
> Members of Genera Psalmopoeus and Tapinauchenius are very prone to fungal infections and have a need to be maintained on the drier side. Also, any container housing members of the above genera should have 2" to 4" substrates of potting soil or topsoil. Stay away from sand and vermiculite as both when wet (high humidities) retain moisture longer than natural soils thereby promoting the growth of fungi and molds that readily grow within the book lung openings and upon the young spiderlings as well.

> Best Wishes,

> "Luc"  

good luck

mike
--
 Mike "troll" Dame & Lynda Rollingson-Dame   *San Francisco Bay
Area*    

 Troll Quality Tarantulas (we are not a dealer)
 Tarantula & Scorpion info, photos and Tarantula videos
 http://harmful.ninjasuits.org/troll/tarantula.html

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by Jesse Kelle » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> > Okay, my question is (and I've asked this before and gotten no answer
> <hmph!>) HOW do you determine the humidity so precisely?  Is there some
> kinda thing you can buy that does it, or do you have to just .. know these
> things somehow? :).  Any info would be appreciated..

> ~You must use the force, Luke... Heheh..~

AAggh! :)
 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by 3.. » Thu, 08 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Hi Mike

I certainly did'n't mean to mislead anybody.I got the information from my books and all of them concur on keeping this species, which is a rain forest tarantula, at high humidity. Schultze even said that "desiccation is suspected to be a major cause of death in captive rain or moist forest tarantulas". I also could not find any mention of this species being difficult to maintain. I am not disputing the conclusions you posted. In fact I am very interested because I keep a Tapenauchenius. Regards.
Thea

Quote:

> >> The
> > >humidity
> > >for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a

> > Thanks Thea!

> no no no they do real bad at that high of a humidity! keep them at
> 55%-60% with a water dish available at all times and mist ever two to 3
> weeks. we reciently had a discussion on cambridgei due to the fact so
> many of us were haveing poor luck and this is what Luc Ross had to
> say...
> > To All,

> > The problem that keeps rearing its ugly head is the misinformation from the past that arboreals need high humidity, sweltering hot environments to thrive. If you want to guarantee unhealthy arboreals that may well perish, then, follow this advice!
> > Humidity is necessary for all tarantula species including those from xeric environments such as many African and Mexican species but, when it comes to arboreals, its the airflow and ventilation that is the important factor in maintaining healthy specimens in captivity.
> > I've maintained hundreds of arboreals in captivity and only raise the humidity during pre-molt, molt, and 3 days post molt then, I raise it from 70% to 75% to a maximum high of 80%.
> > Members of Genera Psalmopoeus and Tapinauchenius are very prone to fungal infections and have a need to be maintained on the drier side. Also, any container housing members of the above genera should have 2" to 4" substrates of potting soil or topsoil. Stay away from sand and vermiculite as both when wet (high humidities) retain moisture longer than natural soils thereby promoting the growth of fungi and molds that readily grow within the book lung openings and upon the young spiderlings as well.

> > Best Wishes,

> > "Luc"

> good luck

> mike
> --
>  Mike "troll" Dame & Lynda Rollingson-Dame   *San Francisco Bay
> Area*

>  Troll Quality Tarantulas (we are not a dealer)
>  Tarantula & Scorpion info, photos and Tarantula videos
>  http://harmful.ninjasuits.org/troll/tarantula.html

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by 3.. » Thu, 08 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Jesse

The thing you are looking for is a hygrometer. It measures the % of moisture in the atmosphere. Hardware stores and herp type pet stores sell them.
Thea

Quote:


> > >> The
> > > >humidity
> > > >for these must also be high- around 70 -90%. You can also use a

> <snip snip>

> > no no no they do real bad at that high of a humidity! keep them at
> > 55%-60% with a water dish available at all times and mist ever two to 3

> <snip snip>

> > > I've maintained hundreds of arboreals in captivity and only raise the humidity during pre-molt, molt, and 3 days post molt then, I raise it from 70% to 75% to a maximum high of 80%.

> <snippity snip>

> Okay, my question is (and I've asked this before and gotten no answer <hmph!>) HOW do you determine the humidity so precisely?  Is there some kinda thing you can buy that does it, or do you have to just .. know these things somehow? :).  Any info would be appreciated..

>             Jesse.

 
 
 

Chevrons?

Post by Psionic Imperato » Fri, 09 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
> Okay, my question is (and I've asked this before and gotten no answer

<hmph!>) HOW do you determine the humidity so precisely?  Is there some
kinda thing you can buy that does it, or do you have to just .. know these
things somehow? :).  Any info would be appreciated..

~You must use the force, Luke... Heheh..~

~Keith~
~djPSIONIC~
:ELECTROMAGNETIC:
~Saturday nights, 8 - 10,
cjsf, 93.9 cable fm
Vancouver, BC, Canada~
"The synthesis of aggression in sequence."