Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

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Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

Post by John Do » Mon, 18 Feb 2002 17:32:43



Well I thought I had the temps and humidity correct. But the humidity seems
to fluxuate between 68-72%, and the temp is around 74F. How can i keep the
temp up without using an incandescent light bulb? What about a UV light?
Same goes for the humidity, right now i have a water dish, about 3" wide,
and a 1" deep, i have also misted quite a few times today, as for my top i
am using card board with sections cut out, then the screen top ontop of it.
I have tried putting the pieces back in the cardboard and the humidity goes
up to around 90%, i cant seem to get it right. Thanks for any help.
-John
 
 
 

Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

Post by Jason Turn » Mon, 18 Feb 2002 19:32:42


I have learned that for most Ts, you don't really need to worry too much
about temp and humidity. Especially if your T was captive bred. As far
as temp......do you keep your house so cold that you actually need to
heat your T? I keep my house at 76F and my Ts do fine. If you need to,
put all of your Ts in a small room or closet (Ts do not need light) and
heat that smaller space with a reliable space heater. The
humdity......just cover most of the holes or screen on the cage and keep
the substrate slightly moist. You should do fine. I also raise a lot of
house plants and bonsai trees and I know that misting is more of a myth
when it comes to increasing humidity. It just doesn't make an
appreciable difference. Misting is a good way to give your T and
substrate extra water. It doesn't disturb them as much as just pouring
the water in. With my larger Ts I just pour water in the cage. Smaller
Ts get misting. A lot of beginners worry too much about Temp and
humidity. But if you only have a few Ts I guess that doesn't hurt. But
its a burden when you have 50.  

                 Thank You
                 Jason Turner

 
 
 

Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

Post by Alison Chaike » Tue, 19 Feb 2002 01:43:57


My boyfriend came up with a humidification method that I think is a
good compromise.  It's a small plastic bottle (formerly a spice
bottle, I think), well rinsed-out.  In the bottom he made a small hole
using a pin.  He tied a knot in a bit of string and pulled it through
the hole, so that the knot prevents the end of the string from coming
out.  The string is fairly tight in the hole, so water has to wick out
slowly.  If you fill the bottle with water, tighten the lid, place it
in the cage, and loosen the lid, you'll find that the water is
dispensely slowly along the whole length of the string.  This method
is more gentle than pouring water, but doesn't make a mess on the
glass the way misting does.

--

(650) 236-2231 [daytime]        http://www.wsrcc.com/alison/
"Suddenly the United States found its power checked in a thousand
different ways, but . . .  it had not yet generated a vision of the
world . . . as subtle, nuanced, and cunning as the world itself.  The
world had changed, and America was not ready when it did."
-- Thomas Friedman, _From Beirut to Jerusalem_, 1989

 
 
 

Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

Post by <Gml.. » Tue, 19 Feb 2002 05:30:34




Quote:

> My boyfriend came up with a humidification method that I think is a
> good compromise.  It's a small plastic bottle (formerly a spice
> bottle, I think), well rinsed-out.  In the bottom he made a small hole
> using a pin.  He tied a knot in a bit of string and pulled it through
> the hole, so that the knot prevents the end of the string from coming
> out.  The string is fairly tight in the hole, so water has to wick out
> slowly.  If you fill the bottle with water, tighten the lid, place it
> in the cage, and loosen the lid, you'll find that the water is
> dispensely slowly along the whole length of the string.  This method
> is more gentle than pouring water, but doesn't make a mess on the
> glass the way misting does.

I use distilled water for watering.  No residue on the glass and no chance
of introducing chemicals that would cause the tarantula problems.

Other than the water dish, I dispense a small amount of water directly onto
the substrate.  I try to keep just a tiny bit of condensation on the cold
side of the 2-1/2 gallon enclosure.  Evaporation from the substrate produces
a near-constant humidity level.

The top of the enclosure is a sheet of plexiglas with a dozen or so 1/4
holes drilled in it.  When I had spiderlings in the enclosure I had a solid
glass top that was sealed well enough to prevent spiderling escapes, which
did not seem to affect the *** adversely.  I removed the top every couple
of days to allow fresh air to circulate.  With the small air leaks allowed
by the glass top it would probably provide sufficient ventalation for an
***.

George

 
 
 

Temperature and Humidity for a Cobalt Blue

Post by Leslie Fo » Tue, 19 Feb 2002 16:44:04


At 70+ in the winter that is OK it will be higher in the summer. A
flurescent light often shows spiders in their true colours if you get the
chance checkout Avic in this light Cobalts should be the same.

Quote:
> Well I thought I had the temps and humidity correct. But the humidity
seems
> to fluxuate between 68-72%, and the temp is around 74F. How can i keep the
> temp up without using an incandescent light bulb? What about a UV light?
> Same goes for the humidity, right now i have a water dish, about 3" wide,
> and a 1" deep, i have also misted quite a few times today, as for my top i
> am using card board with sections cut out, then the screen top ontop of
it.
> I have tried putting the pieces back in the cardboard and the humidity
goes
> up to around 90%, i cant seem to get it right. Thanks for any help.
> -John