Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

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Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by -B.LI » Sun, 29 May 1994 03:27:02



greetings folks from the other side of the world,

i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
$1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.

i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
more pests than pets?

thanx in advance,
--
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Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Kevin Morr » Mon, 30 May 1994 11:18:13


Newsgroups: soc.culture.australian
Subject: Re: Requesting Information
Summary:
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Sender:
Followup-To:
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Organization: Mentor Graphics Corporation; Beaverton, Oregon
Keywords:

Newsgroups: soc.culture.australian
Subject: Information wanted
Summary:
Expires:


Followup-To:
Distribution:
Organization: Mentor Graphics Corporation; Beaverton, Oregon
Keywords:

Hi, My name is Laura.  I'm 8 years old and in 2nd grade in
Portland, Oregon  USA.  I'm doing a school project on Australia
and would like to ask some questions about kids my age in
Australia.  If I could get answers from some kids, or someone
who knows about them, I would really appreciate it.

Please respond by E-mail to:

I need the answers before June 2 for my project.

My questions are:
What is your name?
Where do you live?
What are your favorite:
- games
- school activities
- vacation activities
- music
- foods
What are some special things about being a kid in Australia?
What do Australian kids think American kids are like?
What are some funny expressions you like to say?
What kind of animals live near your home?

I promise to answer any questions you might have also.

Thanks.

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Paul Bar » Mon, 30 May 1994 12:47:59


: greetings folks from the other side of the world,

: i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
: parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
: keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
: $1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
: greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.

: i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
: more pests than pets?

I have a lot of green parrots, they live in the trees in my backyard.
How much did you say you would pay for them   ;-) ;-)

(before you start, I would never.......)

paul

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by John La » Mon, 30 May 1994 09:17:32


Quote:

>i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
>more pests than pets?

Pests! The amount of wheat these birds get into is amazing. Wheat farmers
get so preoccupied with this that their nickname is 'cockies'. It could
also have something to do with them getting every last bit of grain off
the ground.

One of the biggest flocks ever recorded was on the Speewah in 1967. There
was a mob of galahs, about a million or more who had taken up residence on
a large river red gum about a mile from the homestead. They had to move on
to this tree further away after their sheer weight had broken off the
limbs from any closer trees.

Anyway, they were giving the harvest a bit of a***, and the boss had
asked Crooked Mick (his back, not his light fingered habits) to do
something about it. Now this is not an easy thing to do, as they have a
habit of standing lookouts when they are raiding the crops - one screech
and their all gone. So, Mick decided on a lateral approach, and knowing
that the tree they used was the only one left and they had to return to
it, he mixed up a large batch of strong bird lime (a sort of glue) and
coated the limbs of the tree with it.

Well, it worked like a charm, apart from one thing. Mick was creeping up
on them, when he trod on a twig from one of the broken branches, and
alarmed the flock. They all tried to take off at once, and being firmly
anchored to the tree by the lime, they pulled it up by the roots. Within
minutes it was a mile high and heading south.

The boss was not well pleased at the only shade for 300 miles being lifted
by a flock of birds and sacked Mick on the spot. Still that's how he ended
up getting his big break in Ballarat where he chopped up disused mine
shafts and sold them as fence post holes.

What became of the tree? Well it snagged a power line in Tassy and the
short set it on fire and it burnt to a crisp along with the birds, but not
before it started the 1967 bushfires down there.

Well I'd better get back to it. I'm doing the artwork for a run of verbal
agreement forms, and if the boss knew I was wasting time on news I'd get
the bullet and no mistake!

Cheers
John

--
   _--_|\             John Lamp, originating in Hobart, Tasmania
  /      \                 Phone: 002 20 2957 - Fax: 002 34 5685


 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by George Dragicev » Tue, 31 May 1994 07:11:47


Quote:

>greetings folks from the other side of the world,
>i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
>parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
>keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
>$1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
>greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.
>i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
>more pests than pets?
>thanx in advance,
>>>People keep some types of parrots as pets - mainly sulfur

cresteds,galahs and of course budgies. They are considered pests only by
farmers as far as I know, especially grain farmers who lose part of their
crop to them. The rarer ones like the gang-gang etc. certainly are not pests.
They're all protected in Australia (again as far as I know) and customs
is continually fighting bird smugglers trying to get them out of the country.
Obviously a lucrative market for them outside Australia and people face
harsh penalties if they are caught smuggling.
--
regards
George Dragicevic

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Steven Rosset » Tue, 31 May 1994 11:41:37


Quote:


>Subject:***atoos and parrots in Australia
>Date: Fri, 27 May 1994 18:27:02 GMT
>greetings folks from the other side of the world,
>i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
>parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
>keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
>$1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
>greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.
>i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
>more pests than pets?

The high prices reflect the tough laws concerning removing native wildlife
from here. I don't exactly know the procedure, but I assume it's not easy.
Pet***atoos are not uncommon up this end of the continent (Northeast), and
sulphur-crested***ys are definitely not in danger.  However the rarer
types such as black***atoos and to a lesser extent the galahs are
protected as far as I know.  Certainly the SC***ys are considered a pest
in the sugar cane growing regions as they do significant crop damage.
The only lorikeet I know much about is the rainbow lorikeet, which is
certainly alive and thriving over the entire region.  They are not really a
pest, except for the amount of noise they make.  I used to enjoy watching
them eat the harvested and partially fermented sugar cane, only to end up
rolling around on the ground drunk out of their brains for a few minutes.
Hilarious!

Cheers
Steve
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============================================================================

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Kym Horse » Tue, 31 May 1994 16:20:42


Quote:


>: greetings folks from the other side of the world,

>: i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
>: parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
>: keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
>: $1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
>: greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.

>: i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
>: more pests than pets?

>I have a lot of green parrots, they live in the trees in my backyard.
>How much did you say you would pay for them   ;-) ;-)

As most probably know, it is generally illegal to capture, keep and/or sell
Oz native animals. Budgies (aka "parakeets" to Americans) &ct
that were bred in captivity from stock captured way back are, of course,
exempt.

However the Oz government is looking into
trading the beasties for fun and profit. May cut down on
the $M being "lost" (not to mention quite a few animals destroyed)
in the illegal (international) trade.

-kym

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Andrew Taylo » Tue, 31 May 1994 21:22:23


Quote:

>However the Oz government is looking into trading the beasties for fun
>and profit. May cut down on the $M being "lost" (not to mention quite a
>few animals destroyed) in the illegal (international) trade.

This is a perennial question - Why don't we allow the capture and
export wild parrot species such as Galahs or Sulphur-crested***atoos
which are so abundant that can be agricultural pests?

There are two common objections:

a) A legal trade in capture and export of wild birds would make it
easier to camouflage the illegal export of rarer bird species.
Many of us would forgo some profit rather than risk exacerbating
an illegal trade which is already a serious problem.

For example, illegal trade has driven the Golden-Shouldered Parrot very
close to extinction.  Its effective wild population may be less than 50.
Its prospects currently look pretty dim.

b) A general desire to minimise our exploitation of our native fauna.
Many people (me included) think we should be should be reducing
exploitation of our native fauna not increasing it.  This view,
of course, isn't universal but has strong and vocal support.

Andrew Taylor

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Mark Calabret » Wed, 01 Jun 1994 11:37:36



Quote:
> The high prices reflect the tough laws concerning removing native wildlife
> from here. I don't exactly know the procedure, but I assume it's not easy.
> Pet***atoos are not uncommon up this end of the continent (Northeast), and
> sulphur-crested***ys are definitely not in danger.  However the rarer
> types such as black***atoos and to a lesser extent the galahs are
> protected as far as I know.  Certainly the SC***ys are considered a pest

Since Sulphur-crested***atoos are so long lived (70 years in captivity) there is
a danger that if they stop reproducing their numbers will appear to be strong until
they suddenly crash.

Also, while they may be common in some parts, they may (in fact, may have) become
locally extinct in other parts of their range where they don't (didn't) have such
a stronghold.

There are several subspecies, Cacatua galerita galerita (common in the south east),
C. galerita fitzroyi (in northern Australia), and several others in New Guinea and
the Aru Islands.  I'm not sure that all are equally common, but it's conceivable
that opening the gates for one subspecies may have an adverse effect on the less
common subspecies.

On the other hand, the population of Sulphur-crested***atoos introduced to the
area near Perth is competing adversely with the western Bare-eyed Corella.  An
argument could be made for exporting those interlopers, but presumably this would
have to be done by the government in order to maintain strict control over the
trade.

All parrot and other wildlife species are fully protected everywhere in Australia.
This protection was extended to Sulphur-crested***atoos and Galahs in the 1980s.

Mark Calabretta

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Brian Churchi » Thu, 02 Jun 1994 09:44:19


B Ling asks about our***atoo species...

As stated, Sulphur-Crested abound just about anywhere - very common. It's not
unsual to see eucalypt trees covered in roosting***atoos, and do they
screech.

Around the Dandenong Ranges (Victoria - southern Australia), the
Yellow-Tailed Black***atoo is quite common, although flocks only are only
4-6 in number. They attack our indigenous acacia trees for the seeds, as do
most parrot types. Crimson Rosellas, King Parrots are also very common. Gang
Gangs are sighted, but appear limited - threatened?

Other common***atoos include the Galah (Cacatua roseicapilla). Large
(hundreds) numbers form flocks especially in inland areas. On major
inland highways, they are a traffic hazard, especially at dusk when, of all
places, they like to feed right on the roadside. Cars whizzing by at 120KPH
don't seem to upset them at all - and if one or more is startled, they'll
often end up in the way of a windscreen.

A bountiful number of Corellas inhabit the vast station lands, and according
to farmers, cause untold havoc to crops, wheat and the like - mind you you
can't really blame them, as with most Australian fauna (kangaroos, wombats,
birds etc) their natural habitat has been obliterated. There are moves by
farmers to use gassing to eliminate Corellas from cropland (let's hope that
doesn't succeed)

Sulphur-Crested***atoos are known by some to be a pest. Most of the
population considers them a very attractive comical native bird which we have
displaced from its natural habitat. I have read that people who have
encouraged SC***atoos by feeding them have had their houses attacked, and
there is a case locally documented, where a flock of***atoos started eating
a Western Red Cedar home - window frames and all, quite a costly repair job.

The case against wild feeding is well put in literature - is there a lesson
here?

Keith Rogers

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Brendan Jon » Mon, 30 May 1994 23:38:34


Quote:

>greetings folks from the other side of the world,

>i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
>parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
>keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
>$1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
>greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.

When people do pay that much they should consider the incredible
cruelty inflicted on those birds when they are smuggled out of
Australia to the US.  These birds are hidden in suitcases in
tubes, and drugged without water, food or air for the duration
of the flight.  Most of these birds die, but the odd one that
does survive the trip they can sell for the prices you mention
make it all worthwhile (in the smugglers minds anyway...)

Anyone buying an Australian bird in the US should consider that.
Yes, some people do breed them - but check carefully - the
papers may be forged.

Quote:
>i gather that in australia, such birdies are considered
>more pests than pets?

Not necessarily.  They're natural wildlife here, and I think it's
great living in a suburb that doesn't look different from most
suburbs you might find in American cities, yet being blessed
by the many colourful parrots flying around and sitting
in trees.  When I lived in Sydney (near the Lane Cove Reserve)
there were groups of 20-25 galahs (pink and grey***atoos) who'd
wander around the neighbourhood eating seed from the local grass.
There was a nest of***atoos I passed everyday as I walked to
work; big sulphur crested white ones.

Farmers hate them for eating their seed, but farmers hate all
native animals who do this for this reason.  The birds are not unique.

cheers
bj

--
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NSF could bar the mail and news protocols [..] from the backbone and thereby
encourage private providers to offer a national mail backbone [..]" -RFC 1192.

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Andrew Taylo » Fri, 03 Jun 1994 12:31:32


Quote:

>Not necessarily.  They're natural wildlife here, and I think it's
>great living in a suburb that doesn't look different from most
>suburbs you might find in American cities, yet being blessed
>by the many colourful parrots flying around and sitting
>in trees.  When I lived in Sydney (near the Lane Cove Reserve)
>there were groups of 20-25 galahs (pink and grey***atoos) who'd
>wander around the neighbourhood eating seed from the local grass.
>There was a nest of***atoos I passed everyday as I walked to
>work; big sulphur crested white ones.

Galahs and Sulphur-crested***atoos aren't natural wildlife of the
Sydney area.  At most very small numbers of Sulphur-crested***atoos
were resident when Europeans arrived and  Galahs perhaps visitors
during severe droughts.  The present populations were probably partly
founded by aviary escapee and partly by unassisted immigrants.  The
populations flourish only because of man's changes to the area.

Robert Hughes makes the same mistake in the opening pages of "A Fatal
Shore" describing at length the flocks of Galahs, Sulphur-crested
***atoos and Budgies,  the arriving colonists would have seen around
the harbour.  The description is so eloquent its a pity its completely
untrue.

Hughes mistake with Galahs and Sulphur-crested***atoo is perhaps
understandable if he was relying on his own experience but flocks of
Budgies don't occur near Sydney even today nor do the Pink***atoos he
mentions.  It made me wonder how much of A Fatal Shore is based on
historical accounts and other evidence and how much is just
invention by Hughes.

I remember a number of other errors in the first pages e.g. Hughes
states Europeans didn't see a Eucalypt until the late 18th century but
Dutch explorers for example reached Australia long before this.
Doesn't say much for Hughes' attention to detail or for the checking by
the publishers.

Andrew Taylor

 
 
 

Cockatoos and parrots in Australia

Post by Paul Bar » Fri, 03 Jun 1994 23:18:15



: >greetings folks from the other side of the world,
: >
: >i am interested in knowing how australian folks view
: >parrots such as***atoos, lories, etc.  do many people
: >keep them for pets?  here in the US, folks will pay
: >$1,400 or so for an umbrella***atoo, $2,300 for a
: >greater sulfer-crested, $25,000 for a gang-gang, etc.

: When people do pay that much they should consider the incredible
: cruelty inflicted on those birds when they are smuggled out of
: Australia to the US.  These birds are hidden in suitcases in
: tubes, and drugged without water, food or air for the duration
: of the flight.  Most of these birds die, but the odd one that
: does survive the trip they can sell for the prices you mention
: make it all worthwhile (in the smugglers minds anyway...)

: Anyone buying an Australian bird in the US should consider that.
: Yes, some people do breed them - but check carefully - the
: papers may be forged.
[rest deleted]
Did you know that the authorities in the USA and Australia are now using
DNA testing to check whether the 'legal' birds did indeed come from
legal breeders ?
Now just getting the bird out of Australia doesn't mean that the smuggler
has succeeded, he can still be caught later.
That's one for science ;-)
paul