IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

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IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by The Stacey » Sun, 13 Jun 1999 04:00:00



We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

Gina

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by SBREA » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>ubject: IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

>Date: Sat, 12 June 1999 08:33 PM EDT

>We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
>that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

Get her a mate or resign yourself to playing with her or him 85% of the day and
that may not be enough. It is maddening but I would be curious to know how old
the bird is. Sounds like *** maturity to me. Above all don't punish the
bird, parrots scream and she is just being a parrot. I wear those noise
reduction earnuffs when it gets too bad. You can get them at Home Depot or a
hardware store.
 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by klakk » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00


glad to see you made it on ngs!  as for the screaming, when you figure out a
way to quiet the bf down, let me know and i can try it on my 2 year old ruby
macaw.  the only thing i can find that will work on him is to cover his cage
for about 15 minutes.  sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.  whispering
at him just makes him scream louder, but works for others.
Quote:

>We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
>that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

>Gina

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Parrotre » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>Get her a mate or resign yourself to playing with her or him 85% of the day
>and
>that may not be enough.

That is probably the WORST 2bit pile of advice I have ever heard!!!!!!!  Please
- Sbrea, from we've seen - you are the last person who should be dishing out
advice.

To the originial poster - please give us some more info so we can PROPERLY
advise you of some methods that could help your situation.

When does the screaming occur...
What are your reactions to the screaming...
How old is the bird...

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Frederick Wilso » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00


 Sounds like *** maturity to me. Above all don't punish the

Quote:
> bird, parrots scream and she is just being a parrot. I wear those noise
> reduction earnuffs when it gets too bad. You can get them at Home Depot or a
> hardware store.

Another typical post from you once again demonstrating your truly gross
ignorance.
Birds scream for a wide variety of reasons.  As often as any other
reason it is because we have taught them that the screaming is a way to
get what they want, out of their cage, attention, food, etc.  the first
thing the individual needs to do is to determin why the bird is
screaming.  Until they do that there is no way to intelligently comment
on how the behavior might be modified to bring it within tolerable
levels.
--
TA
FAW

"Hope is a feathered thing that perches on the soul" E.***enson

Visit our web page at
http://www.moonsgarden.com/~faw/Geobass/plot.html

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Louis Boy » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> >Get her a mate or resign yourself to playing with her or him 85% of the day
> >and
> >that may not be enough.

> That is probably the WORST 2bit pile of advice I have ever heard!!!!!!!  Please
> - Sbrea, from we've seen - you are the last person who should be dishing out
> advice.

> To the originial poster - please give us some more info so we can PROPERLY
> advise you of some methods that could help your situation.

> When does the screaming occur...
> What are your reactions to the screaming...
> How old is the bird...

I agree with Sbrea, at least about giving the bird attention.  Getting a
mate is questionable.
Still, if you have parrots you should expect some occasional screaming.
They're birds.  They scream. Enjoy it.

I just acquired a male blue front who's about 4 years old.  He was
caged, alone, and mostly ignored at his previous house. The owner got
rid of him because of the screaming.  I put him with the other uncaged
birds in my living room.  Now he's becoming affectionate and hardly make
a peep.  

--
Lou Boyd

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Kati » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Try taking birdy out when not screaming,  feed when not screaming, play
while not screaming,  Any kind of attention is good for them and screaming
is a way for them to get results.  Look at any kid in the checkout lane at
the grocery store.  Good luck,  also a little time out especially if there
is alot of activity going on at the time.  Take bird out of the room to
quieter surroundings.  They always want to be up front and in the middle.
Good luck
katie
Quote:


> Sounds like *** maturity to me. Above all don't punish the
>> bird, parrots scream and she is just being a parrot. I wear those noise
>> reduction earnuffs when it gets too bad. You can get them at Home Depot
or a
>> hardware store.

>Another typical post from you once again demonstrating your truly gross
>ignorance.
>Birds scream for a wide variety of reasons.  As often as any other
>reason it is because we have taught them that the screaming is a way to
>get what they want, out of their cage, attention, food, etc.  the first
>thing the individual needs to do is to determin why the bird is
>screaming.  Until they do that there is no way to intelligently comment
>on how the behavior might be modified to bring it within tolerable
>levels.
>--
>TA
>FAW

>"Hope is a feathered thing that perches on the soul" E.***enson

>Visit our web page at
>http://www.moonsgarden.com/~faw/Geobass/plot.html

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Winnie Li » Wed, 16 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

> Try taking birdy out when not screaming,  feed when not screaming, play
> while not screaming,  Any kind of attention is good for them and screaming
> is a way for them to get results.  Look at any kid in the checkout lane at
> the grocery store.  Good luck,  also a little time out especially if there
> is alot of activity going on at the time.  Take bird out of the room to
> quieter surroundings.  They always want to be up front and in the middle.
> Good luck
> katie

Maggie is quiet most of the time. Her noisiest time is early evening right
after supper. This can be pretty inconvenient when we are trying to have a
few quiet moments to catch up on our day or when we have friends over and
we can't hear ourselves think, never mind talk.
We have found that bringing Maggie into the room with us when we have
company helps. She sits on her perch quietly as long as she is part of the
group. She also likes to sit by the back door looking out at the activity,
birds, human, dogs, squirrels, cars, whatever. We make sure the storm door
is locked and she looks to her hearts content while we have a quiet
conversation.
She's a great bird and is just being an Amazon. We do our best to work
with and around that fact.

Winnie

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Rottwlr » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
>that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

Hi Gina,
We have a female BF, and she does her share as well.  The previous owner used
to put her in an outside cage, but I've tried that and she still screams - As
she loves it outside when I'm with her, I figured that she's really screaming
because she doesn't want to be alone.  She screams because she wants to be with
me, or when food is being prepared, or when my husband comes home.  It's her
way of getting attention.  When I am home, I do have her riding on my shoulder
when doing certain chores, so this helps, but I can't have her with me 100% of
the time, so she had to learn that.  When it's time for me to put her back, and
she screams, I cover the cage for a 5minute time-out.  Then when I uncover it,
I ask if she will stop screaming now.  When she screamed again, she got another
time out.  She quickly learned this, and now when I ask, she will talk a bit,
instead of scream.  If she says, "Come on", I know it means that she will be
quiet if I move her to one of her other quiet places.  She happens to love the
shower, as I have a special perch in there, and sometimes I'll ask if she wants
to go in the shower, and she'll say, "Come on" meaning yes, so I'll take her in
there for a bit - it's peaceful and quiet in there, and often she takes a nap.
When my husband gets home from work, he either takes a nap or reads, and he
gets very upset with her if she screams.  Often, I was still at work, and would
come home to find her covered, then I'd get upset with him for covering her for
too long.  I've told him to not just walk past her when he gets home, but to at
least say hi, and then if she screams, to ask if she wants to take a nap in the
shower.  She does, and now both are happy.  When we prepare dinner, she really
screams her head off, and the previous owner told me she would put her in
another room.  We either put her on the floor stand in the other room until we
finish eating, or in the shower, wherever she seems to prefer.  Sorry this is
so long, but hope it helps.  Our Blue Front is the noisy one, but we really
love her.  I've also established a routine of times that are just for her, and
she accompanies me whenever I do yard work.  She loves being on my shoulder
when I pull weeds or water the garden.  Often, her and the Moluccan are
enjoying their perches out on the trellis deck watching me cut the grass.  Just
remember, although it's annoying, they are most likely screaming because they
want something and are trying to tell you - very often that "something" they
want is YOU, because they love you!  Well, good luck.
Lisa
 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by Mike » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


My Plato (BGM) croaks a lot...  Even when she is sitting on my arm.
It sounds like "crahhht"  "crahhht" and if I pet her while she is croaking
it becomes "cra-HAAAHHHT!"   :)  But we are pretty much used to
their noises.  Still, they can occasionally pierce our eardrums with a
shrill shriek or an out-and-out explosive screech.   :)

Good luck...

Mike

Quote:

> We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
> that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

> Gina

 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by BDGUNN » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Quote:
>IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

My BFA Screeches when she wants attention, mostly in the AM, there isn't
anything that you can do about it as far as I know. Either ignore it or or talk
to the bird.
 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by KristinS » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


I've got a couple of very chatty and piercingly loud***atiels, also a VERY
loud and constantly chatty budgie, and what I do when things get to be too much
for the family, like during the evening while we're lounging and trying to wind
down and watch some television (and can't hear it), is to take the *loud* bird
upstairs to my room where I have an additional cage.  I'm not really meaning to
*punish* them...just removing them so we won't all get frazzled.  :o)
Sometimes I even look at the birds when they're SCREAMING and I say, "Do you
want to go upstairs?"  They seem to be catching on to that and sometimes will
even quiet down now!  Smarties.  :o)  Gotta treat 'em like kids sometimes!  I
do this very same thing with my children!  Ha!

Kristin

Quote:


>My Plato (BGM) croaks a lot...  Even when she is sitting on my arm.
>It sounds like "crahhht"  "crahhht" and if I pet her while she is croaking
>it becomes "cra-HAAAHHHT!"   :)  But we are pretty much used to
>their noises.  Still, they can occasionally pierce our eardrums with a
>shrill shriek or an out-and-out explosive screech.   :)

>Good luck...

>Mike


>> We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
>> that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

>> Gina

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.
Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
 
 
 

IT'S MADNESS.......THE SCREAMING!!!!!!

Post by KristinS » Thu, 17 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Any way you can remove her from the room for a while when she gets too carried
away with her screaming?  Maybe a free standing perch or tree in another room
of the house?  We've got 'tiels and I know their screams are nothing like
Amazons' screams, but they're all four right here in the living room with us
where we watch TV, and the budgie is just in the kitchen and can make a REAL
racket too sometimes.  I've got a cage up in my room all set up for them with
plenty of toys and I move them upstairs for a while to settle down when they
get too carried away.  :o)  I've heard ignoring them is best, and I also think
it's good to walk over and talk to them a few minutes, since they're usually
begging for our attention and will *sometimes* quiet down after some talking.
But in our case, my husband goes nuts and so, for his sake, I remove the birds
to their upstairs cage when they get loud.  :o)

Kristin

Quote:

>>We have a blue-front amazon that screams alot.  We will except any advice
>>that you want to give.  She's a great bird except for the screaming.

>Hi Gina,
>We have a female BF, and she does her share as well.  The previous owner used
>to put her in an outside cage, but I've tried that and she still screams - As
>she loves it outside when I'm with her, I figured that she's really screaming
>because she doesn't want to be alone.  She screams because she wants to be
>with
>me, or when food is being prepared, or when my husband comes home.  It's her
>way of getting attention.  When I am home, I do have her riding on my
>shoulder
>when doing certain chores, so this helps, but I can't have her with me 100%
>of
>the time, so she had to learn that.  When it's time for me to put her back,
>and
>she screams, I cover the cage for a 5minute time-out.  Then when I uncover
>it,
>I ask if she will stop screaming now.  When she screamed again, she got
>another
>time out.  She quickly learned this, and now when I ask, she will talk a bit,
>instead of scream.  If she says, "Come on", I know it means that she will be
>quiet if I move her to one of her other quiet places.  She happens to love
>the
>shower, as I have a special perch in there, and sometimes I'll ask if she
>wants
>to go in the shower, and she'll say, "Come on" meaning yes, so I'll take her
>in
>there for a bit - it's peaceful and quiet in there, and often she takes a
>nap.
>When my husband gets home from work, he either takes a nap or reads, and he
>gets very upset with her if she screams.  Often, I was still at work, and
>would
>come home to find her covered, then I'd get upset with him for covering her
>for
>too long.  I've told him to not just walk past her when he gets home, but to
>at
>least say hi, and then if she screams, to ask if she wants to take a nap in
>the
>shower.  She does, and now both are happy.  When we prepare dinner, she
>really
>screams her head off, and the previous owner told me she would put her in
>another room.  We either put her on the floor stand in the other room until
>we
>finish eating, or in the shower, wherever she seems to prefer.  Sorry this is
>so long, but hope it helps.  Our Blue Front is the noisy one, but we really
>love her.  I've also established a routine of times that are just for her,
>and
>she accompanies me whenever I do yard work.  She loves being on my shoulder
>when I pull weeds or water the garden.  Often, her and the Moluccan are
>enjoying their perches out on the trellis deck watching me cut the grass.
>Just
>remember, although it's annoying, they are most likely screaming because they
>want something and are trying to tell you - very often that "something" they
>want is YOU, because they love you!  Well, good luck.
>Lisa

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.
Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - Groucho Marx