USDA or Fish and wildlife?

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USDA or Fish and wildlife?

Post by Lis » Thu, 17 May 2001 09:27:10



Hi everyone!
   Over on one of the dog grooming boards I frequent we have a new
poster stating that she can not attend grooming school to become a
groomer because she has an aviary of very rare endangered parrots(won't
say what kind) which get really upset and basically hurt themselves if
she leaves and let's someone else take care of them. She called herself
"flock leader"  She say's that she is in the process of trying to save
this endangered parrot by means of breeding.
  Ok my question is this....Is there not some sort of regulating that
needs to happen if you have a very rare, Say's there's only one left in
the wild, Type of parrot or any species?
  This person states that she will not contact the USDA for help because
they do nothing about puppy mills so she would rather save this
endangered bird herself.
  Doesn't the Fish and wildlife department deal with this?
We think this poster is pulling everybodys chain, So any help from the
experts on this issue would be appreciated!
  Can a private person be responsible for the continuation of an
endangered species?

Thanks
Lisa

"We have met the enemy and he is us."
    ~Pogo~

 
 
 

USDA or Fish and wildlife?

Post by Roby » Thu, 17 May 2001 14:33:12


I believe you are correct.  It requires special permits to care or have in
your posession any endangered animals.  For example, I would like to become
involved in breeding the Queen of Bavaria Conures, but there is so much red
tape to go through I am waiting until I can take more that one....  Please
note that this is my impression only, and not set in stone.
grashppr

Quote:
> Hi everyone!
>    Over on one of the dog grooming boards I frequent we have a new
> poster stating that she can not attend grooming school to become a
> groomer because she has an aviary of very rare endangered parrots(won't
> say what kind) which get really upset and basically hurt themselves if
> she leaves and let's someone else take care of them. She called herself
> "flock leader"  She say's that she is in the process of trying to save
> this endangered parrot by means of breeding.
>   Ok my question is this....Is there not some sort of regulating that
> needs to happen if you have a very rare, Say's there's only one left in
> the wild, Type of parrot or any species?
>   This person states that she will not contact the USDA for help because
> they do nothing about puppy mills so she would rather save this
> endangered bird herself.
>   Doesn't the Fish and wildlife department deal with this?
> We think this poster is pulling everybodys chain, So any help from the
> experts on this issue would be appreciated!
>   Can a private person be responsible for the continuation of an
> endangered species?

> Thanks
> Lisa

> "We have met the enemy and he is us."
>     ~Pogo~

 
 
 

USDA or Fish and wildlife?

Post by Jennifer Mull » Fri, 18 May 2001 09:32:44


Quote:

>   Over on one of the dog grooming boards I frequent we have a new
>poster stating that she can not attend grooming school to become a
>groomer because she has an aviary of very rare endangered parrots(won't
>say what kind) which get really upset and basically hurt themselves if
>she leaves and let's someone else take care of them. She called herself
>"flock leader"  She say's that she is in the process of trying to save
>this endangered parrot by means of breeding.

Sounds like someone really feels the need to be IMPORTANT!  And full of it-
for fun you should ask her what type of endangered bird she's saving.  Mabye
you could even whip up a plate of brownies, pay her a social call, and ask to
see her aviary.  Heh heh heh.

Bull indicator #1: She won't tell you what kind of bird she breeds.

Bull indicator #2: She is apparently clueless about the permitting process.

Bull indicator #3: Where would she *obtain* these rare and endangered parrots?

Bull indicator #4: If she's trying to save the species, she should be breeding
for release, and therefore her birds should not be so dependent on her that
they hurt themselves when she leaves.  

Quote:
>  Ok my question is this....Is there not some sort of regulating that
>needs to happen if you have a very rare, Say's there's only one left in
>the wild, Type of parrot or any species?

Yes - the US Fish and Wildlife Service regulates these permits.  Local Game
Commissions may also get involved.  I was very interested in getting a USFWS
permit that would allow me to keep, breed, sell, and import/export Splendid
Grass (aka Scarlet-Chested) Parrakeets in the US.  The permit was $25, and all
it really required was that I keep an extensive "paper trail" documenting
where all of my birds come from and go to.  Splendids are pretty free-breeding
in the US and not rare at all; I was only interested in getting a permit to
cover my butt, as a friend of mine who owns a pet store was hassled by the
USDA Cage Bird Inspector for having an undocumented Splendid on premises (it
was given to her by a customer).  The USDA gets involved, but IMHO USFWS
issues the permits.

(I gave up on this due to the idiocy of the "Shoot First and Ask Questions
Later" Pennsylvania Game Commission, which keeps insisting that Splendids are
illegal to own even when the USFWS disagrees and the Game Commission can't
produce any legislation to support its claim).

Permits to own rare and severely endangered birds are going to be a lot more
difficult to obtain, and you would need to be an expert in your field to be
permitted to involved in the breeding and release of these birds.  In other
words, John Q. Publick will not be able to get a permit to breed Spix's Macaws
because he thinks they're purty and wants to see more of them in the wild.

Quote:
>  This person states that she will not contact the USDA for help because
>they do nothing about puppy mills so she would rather save this
>endangered bird herself.

Oh, yeah, that's great logic right there.

Sounds like a nutcase.  Her name isn't Gloria, is it?

        -J.