Help training lovebird

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Help training lovebird

Post by Delia Decros » Wed, 04 Aug 1993 21:38:09



Hi Everyone!

I am hoping some of you experts out there can give me some helpful hints.
Last week I bought a Blue-masked lovebird.  The pet shop I bought it from
said it was about 5 months old and that it was hand-fed.  Now that I have
Chloe home she doesn't seem like she's (he's) hand-tame.  She won't really
even come near me and when I put my hands in or near the cage she starts
making alot of noise.  I've tried just talking to her quietly and feeding
her fruit from outside the cage, but she won't eat the fruit even if I put
it in between the bars in the cage.  I would really like to be able to have
her sit with me out of the cage and play.  Should I just grab her and try
to get her used to me holding her?  Should I try to get her to go on a stick?
Please, can someone give me some idea how to train her (him)?  She's really
the cutest thing around and I want to do this right.

Thanks in advance for all your help.

Regards,

Delia

 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by Dan » Wed, 04 Aug 1993 15:28:00



Quote:

>Last week I bought a Blue-masked lovebird.  The pet shop I bought it from
>said it was about 5 months old and that it was hand-fed.  Now that I have
>Chloe home she doesn't seem like she's (he's) hand-tame.  She won't really
>even come near me and when I put my hands in or near the cage she starts
>making alot of noise.  I've tried just talking to her quietly and feeding
>her fruit from outside the cage, but she won't eat the fruit even if I put
>it in between the bars in the cage.  I would really like to be able to have
>her sit with me out of the cage and play.  Should I just grab her and try
>to get her used to me holding her?  Should I try to get her to go on a stick?

It seems like you are doing the right things by talking to her it a
soothing way and trying to entice her with food.  Patience is the key
which I also find hard to do in my enthusiasm o make progress.
For a while approach her cage with your hands behind your back then
slowly let your hands become more visiable to her/him, take a few days
with this.  Keep talking and reassuring the bird with your voice.  Each
time you think she/he is becoming more adjusted to what you are doing
take another try something more.  Make progress in gradual stages with
the goal of being able to feed her/him millet from your hand. You
didn't mention if your birds wings had been clipped.  If they aren't
then take the little guy to the vet or a trusted employee of a pet
store who can do this for you.  This will make the bird dependent on
you for its mobility.  This is desirable in the early stages of its
relationship with you.  At a later date after the first molt, its up
to you personal judgement wether you want the bird to have full flight
or keep its wings clipped.  There a many reasons for and against this.
Also, your bird is treating its cage as its refuge, with its wings
clipped you can accoustomize it to your attentions outside the cage
where it won't feel you are trespassing.
Best of luck with your little friend
Dana
 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by dkrowl » Wed, 04 Aug 1993 23:07:04


Delia:

It's spelled p-a-t-i-e-n-c-e.  :)  Exercise plenty of it, and you may be
rewarded.  I have no lovebirds, but I have *heard* that they're not the
tamest of pet birds, generally speaking.  Good luck! :)

 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by Cher » Thu, 05 Aug 1993 06:10:20


  Delia, do you have a bathtub with solid shower walls surrounding it?
If you do you can use that as a taming area.  One technique that you
could try is to first clip the bird's wings so it can't fly away.  Then
bring the bird, a pillow, a good book, and maybe some food the bird
likes into the rub with you, closing the doors so you're both in that
small area together.  Use the pillow to make yourself comfortable.  The
bird can't go too far away from you; it has to get used to your
presence.  After a few of these sessions, usually the bird will have
learned that you're not a threat since you haven't killed and eaten it
yet. :)  You can read the book while the bird at first hangs around down
by your feet, and then wanders around on you...you can also work on
having the lovebird sit on your finger in the tub after it's gotten used
to not flying away in panic.  A favoured food can help.  Good luck!
/s

 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by Marilyn Wish » Thu, 05 Aug 1993 05:58:44


Delia, just give he(r) time.  You risk losing a finger if you grab.  Even
my very tame lovebird can be vicious.  My vet claims the bird and I have
an exceptional relationship.  (My wildest fantasy fulfilled.......an
exceptional relationship with a bird!)  After clipping her wings, I

allowed her a lot of freedom to roam and explore.  Eventually, she came to
me voluntarily.  A year and one half later, she sleeps on my tummy every
night, after a thorough head scratching, etc., for upwards to 30 minutes.

Marilyn Wisher


 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by Roger Wi » Fri, 06 Aug 1993 05:31:00



Quote:
(Delia Decrosta) writes:
> Hi Everyone!

Hiya Delia!

Quote:
> I am hoping some of you experts out there can give me some helpful hints.
> Last week I bought a Blue-masked lovebird.  The pet shop I bought it from
> said it was about 5 months old and that it was hand-fed.  Now that I have
> Chloe home she doesn't seem like she's (he's) hand-tame.  She won't really
> even come near me and when I put my hands in or near the cage she starts
> making alot of noise.  I've tried just talking to her quietly and feeding
> her fruit from outside the cage, but she won't eat the fruit even if I put
> it in between the bars in the cage.  I would really like to be able to have
> her sit with me out of the cage and play.  Should I just grab her and try
> to get her used to me holding her?  Should I try to get her to go on a stick?
> Please, can someone give me some idea how to train her (him)?  She's really
> the cutest thing around and I want to do this right.

It usually takes a little while for the new bird to adjust.  It has to
adjust to its new surrounding and cage as well as to you.  The best
advice I can give is to just keep on doing what you're doing... Talk to
it (does 'it' have a name yet?  I really hate calling him/her 'it')
and and spend some time with it.  Try leaving the cage door open (while
you are there to make sure it doesn't get into trouble) and let it
explore a little outside the cage.  I would *NOT* suggest just grabbing
it to get it used to you.  That will scare it and might cause more harm
than good.  When the time is right and it is feeling confident that you
are a friend and not an enemy, things should get a lot better!

Good luck!

     +-------------------------------------------+
     |  Roger Wise     Houston, Texas  USA       |

     +-------------------------------------------+

---
 t CP [NR] t   And your bird can sing  
 t QWiKerNet 0.69 t The Macaw's Roost BBS  (713)495-0555 t Houston, Texas  USA

 
 
 

Help training lovebird

Post by sbec.. » Tue, 10 Aug 1993 23:38:59


Quote:

> Hi Everyone!

> I am hoping some of you experts out there can give me some helpful hints.
> Last week I bought a Blue-masked lovebird.  The pet shop I bought it from
> said it was about 5 months old and that it was hand-fed.  Now that I have
> Chloe home she doesn't seem like she's (he's) hand-tame.  She won't really
> even come near me and when I put my hands in or near the cage she starts
> making alot of noise.  I've tried just talking to her quietly and feeding
> her fruit from outside the cage, but she won't eat the fruit even if I put
> it in between the bars in the cage.  I would really like to be able to have
> her sit with me out of the cage and play.  Should I just grab her and try
> to get her used to me holding her?  Should I try to get her to go on a stick?
> Please, can someone give me some idea how to train her (him)?  She's really
> the cutest thing around and I want to do this right.

> Thanks in advance for all your help.

> Regards,

> Delia

Due to problems with our news server this never went through... so this time
it should be readable!....

In addition to getting the wings clipped... my vet gave us a great bird manual
(title slipped my mind) with the following advice:

It said to take the bird into a bathtub or shower stall and close the curtain/
doors.  The bird may be e***d at first, but will eventually accept the
close encounters... and probably sit right on you... then you offer her treats
(my Quaker loved sunflower seeds) and mushy talk.
 You do this in 15+- minute intervals until the
bird is calm enough... then you start the "step-up" or "up" routine.  You
put your finger or hand under the belly but on top of the feet forcing the
bird to get on... and use the command "Step up!"
Method #2, which I didn't have much luck with, was "towel training."
You are supposed to hold the bird in a towel against your chest so s/he can
hear your heart beating and you talk soothingly and pet him/her.
My bird would freeze up, absolutely petrified... and no matter what I did I
couldn't get him to calm down in this position- probably against his wild
instinct to be constrained... my iguana is the same way... sweet and affection-
ate (believe it or not) until you try to constrain him- then he freaks out.

Success story:

My vet told me that my bird was wild caught (from the open band on his foot)
and this worked great!

My bird, Scuttle, ate from my hand in the first session.  By the second session
I was able to carry him out of the bathroom and down the hall to my room and
his cage.  After 4 or 5 sessions he could be let out and when he started
to run I'd say "Step up" and he'd freeze and wait for my finger to step on.
After a month he could mumble the words "step up"... usually after I put him
down after using the command... he'd ruffle his feather and say "Step up,
step up, step UP"  (I feel he was making fun of me - thinking sheesh lady!
is that all you can say is Step UP! Step UP! Step up!?)

2 minor drawbacks... Scuttle (btw if you've ever seen the Little Mermaid and
heard a Quaker "sing" you'll know why my 5 yr. old brother named him this)

1.  The vet said that Quakers tend to tame easily... you might have to have
more patience with a lovebird friend.
2.  Scuttle did have his moments and a very frustrated "mother" would wind
up chasing him for up to 20 min. until I finally caught him in a corner or
a towel.

-Sharon :)