Tarantulas

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Tarantulas

Post by cba.. » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 00:16:28



Does anyone out there know anything about tarantulas?
I've had mine for about 7 months now (my cousin had her before that) and
although she is usually fine with her eating etc., lately (in the last couple
of weeks) she has become very lethargic and not interested in food whatsover.
As she had a molt just before I got her, I was wondering whether she was going
to have one soon hence her condition. Visually she looks fine, it's just that
she hardly ever moves around in the tank or eats anything. The tank is kept at
round about 72 degrees F and reasonably moist to keep the moisture level in the
air of the tank at a reasonable level.
Although I have a book about tarantuals, it doesn't seem to say much about this
sort of thing. Does anyone know, or think they know, what might be wrong?

James Morrison, Univ. of Strathclyde.

 
 
 

Tarantulas

Post by Willis F Yo » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 01:30:59


Quote:

>Although I have a book about tarantuals, it doesn't seem to say much about this
>sort of thing. Does anyone know, or think they know, what might be wrong?

Well Other Questions, (May lead to an answer)

1) How OFTEN do they molt. (Related to Growth rate? I'd assume so)
2) How LONG do they live? An older one may take longer to molt.
3) DO they Hibernate? It is getting "winterry" out, so perhaps the
   weather is to blame.

Hmm. I'll have to ask on rec.Pets...

DOn't seem like a Big Spider would make an Idea Pet tho..
(Neat Pet.. Not too Ideal. )

--
It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats.
"You must realize that the computer has it in for you. The irrefutable
proof of this is that the computer always does what you tell it to do.":

 
 
 

Tarantulas

Post by Jay Venenga - University of Northern Io » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 02:07:40


Quote:
> Does anyone out there know anything about tarantulas?
> I've had mine for about 7 months now (my cousin had her before that) and
> although she is usually fine with her eating etc., lately (in the last couple
> of weeks) she has become very lethargic and not interested in food whatsover.
> As she had a molt just before I got her, I was wondering whether she was going
> to have one soon hence her condition. Visually she looks fine, it's just that
> she hardly ever moves around in the tank or eats anything. The tank is kept at
> round about 72 degrees F and reasonably moist to keep the moisture level in the
> air of the tank at a reasonable level.
> Although I have a book about tarantuals, it doesn't seem to say much about this
> sort of thing. Does anyone know, or think they know, what might be wrong?

> James Morrison, Univ. of Strathclyde.

--

I haven't had my tarantula very long, but from what I've read, I wouldn't think
it would be ready to molt already.  Also, you don't have to worry about it
starving, as they can go a long time without eating (as in months).  I would
say that if this behavior continues for longer than a week to 10 days, consult
with your nearest pet store about some possible things to do to get your
tarantula going again.  Good luck.

-jay

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Tarantulas

Post by Jay Venenga - University of Northern Io » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 04:24:33



Quote:

>>Although I have a book about tarantuals, it doesn't seem to say much about this
>>sort of thing. Does anyone know, or think they know, what might be wrong?

> Well Other Questions, (May lead to an answer)

> 1) How OFTEN do they molt. (Related to Growth rate? I'd assume so)

Not really.  They are only supposed to molt about once a year.  

Quote:
> 2) How LONG do they live? An older one may take longer to molt.

In captivity they can live quite a long time.  I think upwards of seven or
eight years with proper care.

Quote:
> 3) DO they Hibernate? It is getting "winterry" out, so perhaps the
>    weather is to blame.

They will go into a semi-hibernation if they're immediate surroundings are too
cold, but the original poster said the environment was kept at 72 degrees,
which is about ideal.

Quote:

> Hmm. I'll have to ask on rec.Pets...

> DOn't seem like a Big Spider would make an Idea Pet tho..
> (Neat Pet.. Not too Ideal. )

Tarantulas make great pets.  They are easy to care for, and cheap to keep
around.  I feed mine crickets, which cost me $1.00 a dozen, and it will only
eat 3-4 per week, so it is costing me $1.00 a month to feed it.  They are also
quiet, docile, and (believe it or not), very soft to the touch.  In addition,
they are much more interesting than a dog or cat.

Quote:

> --
> It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats.
> "You must realize that the computer has it in for you. The irrefutable
> proof of this is that the computer always does what you tell it to do.":

--
===========================================================================


Information Systems and Computing Services
University of Northern Iowa             USWestNet: (319) 273-2008
Cedar Falls, IA  50614-0509                   FAX: (319) 273-3509

Disclaimer:  My views, not (necessarily) UNI's.
Funny Saying:  (still waiting for something good)
===========================================================================

 
 
 

Tarantulas

Post by Michael Waldvog » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 10:16:18


Quote:
> Does anyone out there know anything about tarantulas?
> James Morrison, Univ. of Strathclyde.

--

Quote:
>I haven't had my tarantula very long, but from what I've read, I wouldn't think
>it would be ready to molt already.  Also, you don't have to worry about it
>starving, as they can go a long time without eating (as in months).  I would
>say that if this behavior continues for longer than a week to 10 days, consult
>with your nearest pet store about some possible things to do to get your
>tarantula going again.  Good luck.
> Jay Venenga

I would agree with the last information.  One other point to consider is
lighting.  Most insects and spiders are sensitive to changes in light
periodicity which may affect them even at a constant temperature.  We
raise insects in laboratories and still see their activity vary with the
seasons to some extent.  Tarantulas don't necessarily eat at regular
intervals; so as the man said, sit tight for about another week.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
| Michael Waldvogel, NCSU-Entomology, Box 7613, Raleigh NC 27695-7613   |
|=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=|


=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

 
 
 

Tarantulas

Post by Michael Weav » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 07:06:18


Quote:

>Does anyone out there know anything about tarantulas?
>I've had mine for about 7 months now (my cousin had her before that) and
>although she is usually fine with her eating etc., lately (in the last couple
>of weeks) she has become very lethargic and not interested in food whatsover.
>As she had a molt just before I got her, I was wondering whether she was going
>to have one soon hence her condition. Visually she looks fine, it's just that
>she hardly ever moves around in the tank or eats anything. The tank is kept at
>round about 72 degrees F and reasonably moist to keep the moisture level in the
>air of the tank at a reasonable level.
>Although I have a book about tarantuals, it doesn't seem to say much about this
>sort of thing. Does anyone know, or think they know, what might be wrong?

>James Morrison, Univ. of Strathclyde.

I have had a tarantula for about 5 months now.
I think that you are right, your spider may be going into another molt. Spiders
molt about every 6 months when growing. Just wait and see. Look at the abdomen
if is is shriveled and wrinkled looking, worry. If not, ok. Spiders can go
for a long time w/o food. Note that they don't move too much :)

Let me know what happens!
--
___________________________________________________________________________
Michael Weaver            | Perhaps when I die I will have the honor


 
 
 

Tarantulas

Post by Michael Weav » Fri, 15 Nov 1991 07:17:51



Quote:


>> 1) How OFTEN do they molt. (Related to Growth rate? I'd assume so)

>Not really.  They are only supposed to molt about once a year.  

I understand that when they are young, they can molt up to 2 or 3 times a year.
Quote:
>> 2) How LONG do they live? An older one may take longer to molt.

>In captivity they can live quite a long time.  I think upwards of seven or
>eight years with proper care.

This depends on the sex of the spider. Males only live a very short time.
The females can live of to 20 or 30 years ( or so I've read. I'm sure someone
will be happy to correct me if I am mistaken :)
Quote:
>Tarantulas make great pets.  They are easy to care for, and cheap to keep
>around.  I feed mine crickets, which cost me $1.00 a dozen, and it will only
>eat 3-4 per week, so it is costing me $1.00 a month to feed it.  They are also
>quiet, docile, and (believe it or not), very soft to the touch.  In addition,
>they are much more interesting than a dog or cat.

I agree. I love my Rose Tarantula. It also makes a good conversation piece!

Quote:
>> --


--
___________________________________________________________________________
Michael Weaver            | Perhaps when I die I will have the honor