releasing a green anole pet to the wild

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releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by swb » Thu, 01 Apr 1999 04:00:00



I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a warmer
climate.  She has been raised from quite young in captivity.  She jumped
out of a shipment of books.  Will she be able to survive on her own?  I
would welcome any info on this question.
                                        Thankyou,

 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by Michael G. Mensinge » Thu, 01 Apr 1999 04:00:00


    Releasing animals into the wild is not usually a good idea. A reptile
that has been in captivity may have difficulty surviving in the outdoors.
Remember, it is used to having crickets dropped into the cage where they
can't escape. In the wild it may have difficulty finding food. I'm not sure
where you live, but in general it is also ill advised to introduce
non-native species into the wild w/o examining the consequences it may have
on other species. A single anole may not cause much harm, but if many people
did this, they could outcompete a native species or take over its niche.
Just some food for thought. You might try giving the anole to a pet shop
that deals in reptiles. they aren't expensive, but I'm sure they'd be
symapthetic to your desire to help the lizard find a new home.
Quote:

> I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a warmer
> climate.  She has been raised from quite young in captivity.  She jumped
> out of a shipment of books.  Will she be able to survive on her own?  I
> would welcome any info on this question.
>                                         Thankyou,


 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by dian » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00


It is not recommended to release once captive lizards into the wild for many
reasons. As another poster stated, being used to be fed by you, their
hunting skills are inadequate for tehm to survive once on their own.
However, also while in captivity, your anole's immune system has changed.
S/he may not be immune to certain bacteria that s/he will now encounter in
the wild (had s/he remained wild she would have developed the necessary
immumities) and also may now harbor bacteria that would be foriegn to the
wild community of the speices. S/he can infect other wild lizards and cause
significant (localized) problems.

I would suggest looking into a pet store and see if they'll take it. Likely
they will help you out. Also you might consider contacting your local herp
society and see if they have anybody interested. Your local herp vet can
also be helpful in this area. If you can not find it a new home, as sad as
it seems, I would suggest euthansia before I could condone re-release.  Good
luck with it.

diana

Quote:

> I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a warmer
> climate.  She has been raised from quite young in captivity.  She jumped
> out of a shipment of books.  Will she be able to survive on her own?  I
> would welcome any info on this question.
>                                         Thankyou,


 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by mike » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00


        I disagree with these others in that a lizard is a lizard is a lizard
and they have natural survival instincts.Now as far as life expectancy
in the wild,as for everything wild the chances are not good.
Quote:

> I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a warmer
> climate.  She has been raised from quite young in captivity.  She jumped
> out of a shipment of books.  Will she be able to survive on her own?  I
> would welcome any info on this question.
>                                         Thankyou,


 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by Bill Caldecut » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00


You are saying that lizard behavior is entirely innate.  Thus, lizards are
incapable of learning or becoming conditioned.  What evidence do you have
for this assertion?

--Bill Caldecutt

Quote:

> I disagree with these others in that a lizard is a lizard is a lizard
>and they have natural survival instincts.Now as far as life expectancy
>in the wild,as for everything wild the chances are not good.

>> I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a warmer
>> climate.  She has been raised from quite young in captivity.  She jumped
>> out of a shipment of books.  Will she be able to survive on her own?  I
>> would welcome any info on this question.
>>                                         Thankyou,


 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by Ken Gilber » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> >> I am thinking of releasing my green anole pet to the wild in a

Why not try posting here where u live with subject  "Free Anole to good
home". I'm sure you'll get some inquiries. I was able to find homes for
a couple of herps that way that I had to get rid of for various reasons.

K

 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by Nathan Ten » Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>    I disagree with these others in that a lizard is a lizard is a lizard
>and they have natural survival instincts.

*boggle*

Boy, are you gonna have a hard time defending *that*.  All those biologists
working on reintroduction programs would have much easier lives if they
didn't have to worry about the conditioning effects of captivity on "their"
animals.

There's no good reason to release even a short-term captive animal into the
wild unless you're a professional, or at least have the knowledge of one.
If you aren't in its native range, either it won't make it in the
inappropriate environment (quite possibly suffering over a long period),
or it'll become an introduced species, which is, um, *really* *bad*.
(Bullfrog, cane toad, tamarisk, Norway rat...)  If you *are* in its native
range, you get to worry about the effects of captivity, plus the risk of
pathogens being borne out into the wild (it has happened; it's widely
suspected that some populations of the desert tortoise in the US Southwest
were badly clobbered by a respiratory plague that arrived with released
animals).  Just *not* a good idea.

        NT
--
Nathan Tenny                     | Words I carry in my pocket, where they
Qualcomm, Inc., San Diego, CA    | breed like white mice.

 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by Melissa Rober » Sun, 04 Apr 1999 04:00:00


I agree with the other posters. where do you live?? If your close enough
I'll come and get it,I have a 100 gal. set-up with other anoles,tree
frogs,house gecko and mandarin newts.Setting him "free" in the wild is
like opening your door to one of your children and saying go on,get
outta here,I'm done playing with you, sorry,don't mean to yap at ya,
but it just gets my goat,when someone wants to release a captive pet.
Missa

computer program not finished yet.

Get Me Outta Here !!!

 
 
 

releasing a green anole pet to the wild

Post by James Strompoli » Sun, 04 Apr 1999 04:00:00


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You can put your goat away.  She already said she's keeping it.


frogs,house gecko and mandarin newts.Setting him "free" in the wild is
like opening your door to one of your children and saying go on,get
outta here,I'm done playing with you, sorry,don't mean to yap at ya,
but it just gets my goat,when someone wants to release a captive pet.
Missa
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