footprints in the snow

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footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Tue, 26 Mar 2013 07:29:15




Quote:
> We've has snow again since Thursday night.

Me too.

Quote:

> Sootie is very annoyed as she was beginning to enjoy the warmer weather of
> the week before. At least she comes in earlier.

Earlier?  she goes out and stays out?  Boyfie shows an amazing  ability to
hold his bladder for 24 hours and then we get the trudging out into the snow
thing ;-)

  >

Quote:
> It also shows the footprints of the new cat (have I mentioned the new cat
> yet) that I think my next door neighbours have got. I haven't seen them to
> ask but DH has seen it in our garden, Sootie sniffs at the step outside
> the patio door when she goes out and DH came in the house one morning last
> week because the cat was asking him for fuss and he didn't want to
> encourage it because of Sootie. The cat the came up to the front door and
> was looking in through the glass. It's a lovely looking cat, ginger and
> white and apparently very friendly at least with humans.)Sootie has been
> edgy when she's gone outside for a couple of weeks. Well now I've seen the
> footprints going along the top of our garden, then reappear the other side
> of the fence and down their garden. If it isn't their's then I think it
> wants to be.

No, you didn't mention a new cat next door.   The only footprints in the
snow here are foxes having a look at my chickens overnight in case I forgot
to shut them away.
Since The Enemy moved away, I rarely see a cat in my garden.
It's not because Boyfie is out and about fighting them off either.
Certainly not during the winter when he prefers to be inside 23 and three
quarter/24.  the other 15 minutes is toilet duties.
He refused to go out for 24 hours when he saw the snow and when he did he
did a two minute+  huge wee.  I wish he would not do this.
He has an emergency litter box for snow and bad rain but will he use it?
No.

I don't like to see him asking to go out to relieve himself and turning back
when he sees snow or torrential rain.  I have tried every possible thing in
the lb.  Cat litter, sawdust pellets, crystals, leaves and earth.  Nope,
good boys do not wee or poo in the house. or if they absolutely have to
during the night (twice in 10 years, upset tummy), they do it in the bath.
Even putting the litterbox in the bath does not help with the idea that it
is ok to use it in snow & rain emergencies.
He prefers to nearly burst.

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Wed, 27 Mar 2013 06:41:02



.

Quote:
>> He prefers to nearly burst.

> Bless him he's such a well brought up Kitty.

But not by me..
Quote:

> Sootie does go out but not for long. she went out tonight for about 15
> minutes, came in for a warm by the radiator and some food then went out
> for about 45 minutes before coming back in for another warm and some more
> dinner. The snow this time has left some uncovered ground by the fence and
> around the base of the Holly bush so she uses that. When we had the snow
> earlier in the year it covered everything and she did use the litter tray
> then but only as a last resort.

> She used it about a week ago while we were out at work, she had a bit of
> an upset stomach then and as she stands on the rim of the tray some goes
> in the tray and some doesn't. :(  I have wondered if she doesn't like the
> feel of the litter under her paws but she does stand in it and scratches
> around, I think she likes her paws well out of the firing line, if you see
> what I mean.

Yes,  I do see what you mean.
If Boyfriend has an upset tummy, well it's the bath if he cannot
get outside..why when there is perfectly good litter box in the bathroom and
even put inside the bath I don't know.
He just refuses to use a litterbox, no matter what it is filled with and how
desperate he is.
He prefers to wait 24 hours to find a place outside.
Then we get the two minute wee. Poor lad.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> Judith Latham
> Stourbridge, West Midlands. UK.

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Fri, 29 Mar 2013 09:11:49



Quote:
>> Oh, to know what goes on in their little heads.

> Perhaps it's better we don't.

I'd love to know more about Boyfriend. How and why he got lost, where he
came from, why he is so shy of visitors and why he won't use a litterbox.
He obviously came from a home where they loved him enough to get him an
extremely posh collar which he was wearing when he arrived (guided by KFC)

I'm never going to know his story.  Did he get into a delivery van and get
taken miles away or did he just wander too far because he was around 8-9
months old and hadn't been neutered?
I favour the first, because I advertised him on the local radio station as a
found cat and put postcards in newsagents windows for miles around and
no-one came forward for him.

Anyway, I'm quite glad they didn't.

I did find out eventually where Kitty Farmcat came from although it took a
few years to do so.  She originally lived quite close and chose to move out.
That was not the case for Boyfie, he was *so* lost and very thin.
It always worries me a bit in case his original family still wonder about
him.    Anyway, he is very happy here, what with his own bedroom and the big
garden and a bit of hunting around the chicken huts (mice and small rats
only, wash yourself if you see a big rat) and sharpening his claws on the
trees.
Oh and also how he rules me with an iron claw about the timing of his meals
;-)

Tweed

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Jane » Sat, 30 Mar 2013 00:23:37


Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months, they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea how to live there.

That's how I got my Fin, who had a very happy and comfortable 10 years with me.

Jane

Quote:



> >> Oh, to know what goes on in their little heads.

> > Perhaps it's better we don't.

> I'd love to know more about Boyfriend. How and why he got lost, where he

> came from, why he is so shy of visitors and why he won't use a litterbox.

> He obviously came from a home where they loved him enough to get him an

> extremely posh collar which he was wearing when he arrived (guided by KFC)

> I'm never going to know his story.  Did he get into a delivery van and get

> taken miles away or did he just wander too far because he was around 8-9

> months old and hadn't been neutered?

> I favour the first, because I advertised him on the local radio station as a

> found cat and put postcards in newsagents windows for miles around and

> no-one came forward for him.

> Anyway, I'm quite glad they didn't.

> I did find out eventually where Kitty Farmcat came from although it took a

> few years to do so.  She originally lived quite close and chose to move out.

> That was not the case for Boyfie, he was *so* lost and very thin.

> It always worries me a bit in case his original family still wonder about

> him.    Anyway, he is very happy here, what with his own bedroom and the big

> garden and a bit of hunting around the chicken huts (mice and small rats

> only, wash yourself if you see a big rat) and sharpening his claws on the

> trees.

> Oh and also how he rules me with an iron claw about the timing of his meals

> ;-)

> Tweed

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Jack Campi » Sat, 30 Mar 2013 04:44:24


Quote:
> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months,
> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
> how to live there.

It happens but not commonly.

I suspect most cats found in that condition have been raised as indoor
cats, rather than being dumped.  Once they get out for the first time
(accidents will happen) they are totally lost.  (The only cats we've
lost have been raised as indoor-only, when we were in a city centre
third-floor flat).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jack Campin,  11 Third Street,  Newtongrange,  Midlothian EH22 4PU,  Scotland
mobile 07800 739 557       <http://www.campin.me.uk>      Twitter: JackCampin

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Sat, 30 Mar 2013 07:55:10



Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months, they
get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the family no
longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but very very thin.
Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea how to live there.

That's how I got my Fin, who had a very happy and comfortable 10 years with
me.

___
No it's not that common. It can happen of course but I think Boyfie was
genuinely lost and if he was from near here, my adverts on the local radio
and postcards everywhere should  have got him home.
Anyway, it didn't.   It's such a pity he didn't have a microchip.
No one in their right mind would let him go because he is so kind and
beautiful.  He is now microchipped to me.

Either he went wandering too far because he was not neutered  (soon sorted)
or he got into a van or lorry and was taken too far.
He cannot not tell me how he got here and why Kitty FC liked him and invited
him into her house.  Kitty hated all cats in her garden and would fight them
all, but when she saw lost Boyfie it was quite different.

Jane

Quote:



> >> Oh, to know what goes on in their little heads.

> > Perhaps it's better we don't.

> I'd love to know more about Boyfriend. How and why he got lost, where he

> came from, why he is so shy of visitors and why he won't use a litterbox.

> He obviously came from a home where they loved him enough to get him an

> extremely posh collar which he was wearing when he arrived (guided by KFC)

> I'm never going to know his story.  Did he get into a delivery van and get

> taken miles away or did he just wander too far because he was around 8-9

> months old and hadn't been neutered?

> I favour the first, because I advertised him on the local radio station as
> a

> found cat and put postcards in newsagents windows for miles around and

> no-one came forward for him.

> Anyway, I'm quite glad they didn't.

> I did find out eventually where Kitty Farmcat came from although it took a

> few years to do so.  She originally lived quite close and chose to move
> out.

> That was not the case for Boyfie, he was *so* lost and very thin.

> It always worries me a bit in case his original family still wonder about

> him.    Anyway, he is very happy here, what with his own bedroom and the
> big

> garden and a bit of hunting around the chicken huts (mice and small rats

> only, wash yourself if you see a big rat) and sharpening his claws on the

> trees.

> Oh and also how he rules me with an iron claw about the timing of his
> meals

> ;-)

> Tweed

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 03:54:57



Quote:
>> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months,
>> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
>> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
>> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
>> how to live there.

> It happens but not commonly.

> I suspect most cats found in that condition have been raised as indoor
> cats, rather than being dumped.  Once they get out for the first time
> (accidents will happen) they are totally lost.  (The only cats we've
> lost have been raised as indoor-only, when we were in a city centre
> third-floor flat).

I have no clue where he came from and he's never told me. It's clear he was
well loved by his expensive collar that was very posh indeed.  It's unlikely
he came from an apartment near here as there are none.
I have always thought that he got into a delivery van by accident miles away
and got out here terribly lost, although I could well be wrong as he might
have wandered too far because he'd not had the snip.  Who knows?
Anyway he met the vet for his snip and he is very happy now.  He does not
wander far, he has  the opportunity to hunt mouses without his hormones
kicking in.

Not snipping.  Well, my mothers neighbour didn't spay her cat and she got
boy kittens. She didn't bother to neuter them either and her favourite one
got crushed by a lorry after the girls.  After she'd been taken to see him,
she got the other boys neutered asap.

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Divamanq » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 04:22:54


Quote:

>> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months,
>> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
>> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
>> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
>> how to live there.

> It happens but not commonly.

I have a friend who lives on a small farm in Northern Minnesota - a
popular summer resort area, especially for the rich and/or famous.
Every fall she has to rescue a number of cats, because the summer people
get a kitten to entertain their kids for the summer, then leave it
behind when they return to the city at the end of summer.  (So their
kids grow up to regard companion animals as objects, rather than family
members!)
 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Joy » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 05:51:35



Quote:


>>> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months,
>>> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
>>> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
>>> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
>>> how to live there.

>> It happens but not commonly.

> I have a friend who lives on a small farm in Northern Minnesota - a
> popular summer resort area, especially for the rich and/or famous. Every
> fall she has to rescue a number of cats, because the summer people get a
> kitten to entertain their kids for the summer, then leave it behind when
> they return to the city at the end of summer.  (So their kids grow up to
> regard companion animals as objects, rather than family members!)

My beloved Nanki-Poo was one of several cats abandoned by a family when they
moved out of the house where they'd been living.

I'm not sure whether or not I believe in a literal hell, but there are times
when I want to believe there is one for people who mistreat animals and
children.

Joy

 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Christina Websel » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 07:35:13



Quote:



>>>> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6 months,
>>>> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
>>>> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
>>>> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
>>>> how to live there.

>>> It happens but not commonly.

>> I have a friend who lives on a small farm in Northern Minnesota - a
>> popular summer resort area, especially for the rich and/or famous. Every
>> fall she has to rescue a number of cats, because the summer people get a
>> kitten to entertain their kids for the summer, then leave it behind when
>> they return to the city at the end of summer.  (So their kids grow up to
>> regard companion animals as objects, rather than family members!)

> My beloved Nanki-Poo was one of several cats abandoned by a family when
> they moved out of the house where they'd been living.

> I'm not sure whether or not I believe in a literal hell, but there are
> times when I want to believe there is one for people who mistreat animals
> and children.

> Joy

I believe in Karma.  If you mistreat animals or children or anyone it will
come back to you in a major way eventually.
Tweed
 
 
 

footprints in the snow

Post by Joy » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 07:42:06



Quote:






>>>>> Do people 'toss' pets in the UK?   Usually when they're about 6
>>>>> months,
>>>>> they get tossed out because they are no longer a 'cute kitten' and the
>>>>> family no longer wants them.  That's why they're often socialized, but
>>>>> very very thin.  Not having been raised in the wild, they have no idea
>>>>> how to live there.

>>>> It happens but not commonly.

>>> I have a friend who lives on a small farm in Northern Minnesota - a
>>> popular summer resort area, especially for the rich and/or famous. Every
>>> fall she has to rescue a number of cats, because the summer people get a
>>> kitten to entertain their kids for the summer, then leave it behind when
>>> they return to the city at the end of summer.  (So their kids grow up to
>>> regard companion animals as objects, rather than family members!)

>> My beloved Nanki-Poo was one of several cats abandoned by a family when
>> they moved out of the house where they'd been living.

>> I'm not sure whether or not I believe in a literal hell, but there are
>> times when I want to believe there is one for people who mistreat animals
>> and children.

>> Joy

> I believe in Karma.  If you mistreat animals or children or anyone it will
> come back to you in a major way eventually.
> Tweed

I certainly hope so.  I'm not normally a vindictive person, and don't hold
grudges.  However, some things are beyond the pale.

Joy