Possum babies move into baby's house!

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Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by dgk » Wed, 18 Apr 2012 03:28:13



A scream from the significant other drew my attention to the styrofoam
house that I built for the outdoor cat Baby. A few weeks ago a raccoon
moved in for a day but quickly left. Yesterday it was a mother possum
with her babies. So cute. Baby is letting them stay rent free, but as
of last evening the mother had gone and the babies were still there;
by this morning she had moved all the babies elsewhere.

I have this link to a picture:

https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=772808075015dcbe&resid=77280...

Wow, is that a link. Microsoft has to do better than that if they
expect people to use Skydrive.

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Adria » Wed, 18 Apr 2012 06:37:21


Quote:

> A scream from the significant other drew my attention to the styrofoam
> house that I built for the outdoor cat Baby. A few weeks ago a raccoon
> moved in for a day but quickly left. Yesterday it was a mother possum
> with her babies. So cute. Baby is letting them stay rent free, but as
> of last evening the mother had gone and the babies were still there;
> by this morning she had moved all the babies elsewhere.

> I have this link to a picture:

> https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=772808075015dcbe&resid=77280...

> Wow, is that a link. Microsoft has to do better than that if they
> expect people to use Skydrive.

Very cute.
--
Adrian
 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Mary » Wed, 18 Apr 2012 06:44:02


A scream from the significant other drew my attention to the styrofoam
house that I built for the outdoor cat Baby. A few weeks ago a raccoon
moved in for a day but quickly left. Yesterday it was a mother possum
with her babies. So cute. Baby is letting them stay rent free, but as
of last evening the mother had gone and the babies were still there;
by this morning she had moved all the babies elsewhere.

I have this link to a picture:

https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=772808075015dcbe&resid=77280...

Wow, is that a link. Microsoft has to do better than that if they
expect people to use Skydrive.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
How cute!  And it reminds me of a story my mother used to tell from her
childhood.  Her parents were farmers, and she used to gather eggs for the
family.  They were free-range chickens, of course, so the hens laid eggs in
various places.  One of the places where Mother would often find eggs was in
the boot of an old buggy.  One day, she reached in and was startled to hear
"hsssssss."  She quickly withdrew her hand, thinking it was a snake.  Then
she peered in *very carefully* and found a mother possum and a bunch of
babies.  Mother ran to the house and brought her father back.  By the time
they got back, there was only the mother possum.  The babies were in her
pouch, of course.  So, my grandfather very carefully transferred them to a
big watering tank (*no water* in it), and he left them there just long
enough so the other children in the family could see them.  Then he released
them in a safe area behind the barn.  My mother told us that story many
times, and I could always see how much she enjoyed it.

MaryL

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by dgk » Thu, 19 Apr 2012 00:07:13


On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

Quote:


>A scream from the significant other drew my attention to the styrofoam
>house that I built for the outdoor cat Baby. A few weeks ago a raccoon
>moved in for a day but quickly left. Yesterday it was a mother possum
>with her babies. So cute. Baby is letting them stay rent free, but as
>of last evening the mother had gone and the babies were still there;
>by this morning she had moved all the babies elsewhere.

>I have this link to a picture:

>https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=772808075015dcbe&resid=77280...

>Wow, is that a link. Microsoft has to do better than that if they
>expect people to use Skydrive.

>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>How cute!  And it reminds me of a story my mother used to tell from her
>childhood.  Her parents were farmers, and she used to gather eggs for the
>family.  They were free-range chickens, of course, so the hens laid eggs in
>various places.  One of the places where Mother would often find eggs was in
>the boot of an old buggy.  One day, she reached in and was startled to hear
>"hsssssss."  She quickly withdrew her hand, thinking it was a snake.  Then
>she peered in *very carefully* and found a mother possum and a bunch of
>babies.  Mother ran to the house and brought her father back.  By the time
>they got back, there was only the mother possum.  The babies were in her
>pouch, of course.  So, my grandfather very carefully transferred them to a
>big watering tank (*no water* in it), and he left them there just long
>enough so the other children in the family could see them.  Then he released
>them in a safe area behind the barn.  My mother told us that story many
>times, and I could always see how much she enjoyed it.

>MaryL

Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
they don't get Rabies and such.

Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Mary » Thu, 19 Apr 2012 00:46:48


On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

Quote:


>A scream from the significant other drew my attention to the styrofoam
>house that I built for the outdoor cat Baby. A few weeks ago a raccoon
>moved in for a day but quickly left. Yesterday it was a mother possum
>with her babies. So cute. Baby is letting them stay rent free, but as
>of last evening the mother had gone and the babies were still there;
>by this morning she had moved all the babies elsewhere.

>I have this link to a picture:

>https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=772808075015dcbe&resid=77280...

>Wow, is that a link. Microsoft has to do better than that if they
>expect people to use Skydrive.

>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>How cute!  And it reminds me of a story my mother used to tell from her
>childhood.  Her parents were farmers, and she used to gather eggs for the
>family.  They were free-range chickens, of course, so the hens laid eggs in
>various places.  One of the places where Mother would often find eggs was
>in
>the boot of an old buggy.  One day, she reached in and was startled to hear
>"hsssssss."  She quickly withdrew her hand, thinking it was a snake.  Then
>she peered in *very carefully* and found a mother possum and a bunch of
>babies.  Mother ran to the house and brought her father back.  By the time
>they got back, there was only the mother possum.  The babies were in her
>pouch, of course.  So, my grandfather very carefully transferred them to a
>big watering tank (*no water* in it), and he left them there just long
>enough so the other children in the family could see them.  Then he
>released
>them in a safe area behind the barn.  My mother told us that story many
>times, and I could always see how much she enjoyed it.

>MaryL

Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
they don't get Rabies and such.

Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

MaryL

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Christina Websel » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:06:53



Quote:


> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
> they don't get Rabies and such.

> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
> marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are they
not mammals?
I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
Tweed
 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Christina Websel » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:10:09



Quote:





>> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

>> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
>> they don't get Rabies and such.

>> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
>> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
>> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
>> marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

> If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are
> they not mammals?
> I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
> It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
> Tweed

Yep
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Are_marsupials_mammals

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Divamanq » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:44:21


Quote:




>> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

>> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
>> they don't get Rabies and such.

>> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
>> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
>> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
>> marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

> If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are they
> not mammals?
> I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
> It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
> Tweed

Are you sure?  The duck-billed platypus also feeds its young on milk,
but I don't think it's considered a "mammal" either.  I thought the
distinction is whether or not the young can exist separate from the
mother.  The platypus lays eggs, which must hatch before the baby can be
on its own.  I think marsupial babies must spend time in the mother's
pouch between birth and being capable of living on its own.

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Bastett » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:49:00



 >> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
 >> marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

 > If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are they
 > not mammals?
 > I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
 > It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.

Exactly. A marsupial is a type of mammal. Most mammals are "placental",
but marsupials are not.

--
Joyce

"The most terrible things can enter one's life. Hopefully they're only
mundane."                                     -- The Midwest Book Review

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Christina Websel » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 11:12:20



Quote:






>>> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

>>> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
>>> they don't get Rabies and such.

>>> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
>>> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
>>> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

>>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums
>>> are marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with
>>> mammals.

>> If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are
>> they not mammals?
>> I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
>> It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
>> Tweed

> Are you sure?  The duck-billed platypus also feeds its young on milk, but
> I don't think it's considered a "mammal" either.  I thought the
> distinction is whether or not the young can exist separate from the
> mother.  The platypus lays eggs, which must hatch before the baby can be
> on its own.  I think marsupial babies must spend time in the mother's
> pouch between birth and being capable of living on its own.

A platypus is also a mammal
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_a_platypus_a_mammal

Tweed

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Mary » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 11:43:26




Quote:


> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
> they don't get Rabies and such.

> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums are
> marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with mammals.

If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are they
not mammals?
I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
Tweed

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You're right.

MaryL

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Joy » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 15:15:47



Quote:








>>>> On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 16:44:02 -0500, "MaryL"

>>>> Possums are very cool. Literally as well - low body temperature so
>>>> they don't get Rabies and such.

>>>> Many neighbors stopped by to check out the baby possums - I didn't
>>>> mind since I really wanted them to move on anyway and figured that mom
>>>> wouldn't appreciate the attention and would move away. She did.

>>>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>>> Possums (opossums) can get rabies, but it is extremely rare.  Possums
>>>> are marsupials, not mammals, and rabies is usually associated with
>>>> mammals.

>>> If they produce milk for their babies - which they do - in what way are
>>> they not mammals?
>>> I'm not a possum expert, but AFAIK they are mammals.
>>> It's possible to be a marsupial and a mammal at the same time.
>>> Tweed

>> Are you sure?  The duck-billed platypus also feeds its young on milk, but
>> I don't think it's considered a "mammal" either.  I thought the
>> distinction is whether or not the young can exist separate from the
>> mother.  The platypus lays eggs, which must hatch before the baby can be
>> on its own.  I think marsupial babies must spend time in the mother's
>> pouch between birth and being capable of living on its own.

> A platypus is also a mammal
> http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_a_platypus_a_mammal

> Tweed

It is also a monotreme.

Joy

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Debbie Wils » Fri, 20 Apr 2012 21:20:14


Quote:

> It is also a monotreme.

Yes - the living members of the class Mammalia are divided into three
sub-classes: Monotremata (egg-laying mammals such as echidnas,
platypuses etc); Marsupalia (marsupials such as kangaroos, wombats,
koalas, opossums etc that give birth to poorly developed young into a
pouch) and Placentalia (mammals that have a placenta and give birth to
well-formed offspring - all the rest, including us).

Another interesting misconception is that 'animals' and 'mammals' are
the same thing. The kingdom Animalia actually includes anything that is
not a plant, bacteria, virus, fungus or protistan. Therefore fish,
birds, reptiles, amphibians, molluscs, arthropods, worms etc are all
animals. Two nice images illustrating this can be seen here:
http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/30/76630-034-88186EA7.jpg
http://gryphonschoollrc.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/classification.jpg

Here endeth the lesson :-)

Deb.
--
http://www.scientific-art.com

"He looked a fierce and quarrelsome cat, but claw he never would;
He only bit the ones he loved, because they tasted good." S. Greenfield

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Joy » Sat, 21 Apr 2012 02:37:19



Quote:

>> It is also a monotreme.

> Yes - the living members of the class Mammalia are divided into three
> sub-classes: Monotremata (egg-laying mammals such as echidnas,
> platypuses etc); Marsupalia (marsupials such as kangaroos, wombats,
> koalas, opossums etc that give birth to poorly developed young into a
> pouch) and Placentalia (mammals that have a placenta and give birth to
> well-formed offspring - all the rest, including us).

> Another interesting misconception is that 'animals' and 'mammals' are
> the same thing. The kingdom Animalia actually includes anything that is
> not a plant, bacteria, virus, fungus or protistan. Therefore fish,
> birds, reptiles, amphibians, molluscs, arthropods, worms etc are all
> animals. Two nice images illustrating this can be seen here:
> http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/30/76630-034-88186EA7.jpg
> http://gryphonschoollrc.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/classification.jpg

> Here endeth the lesson :-)

> Deb.
> --
> http://www.scientific-art.com

> "He looked a fierce and quarrelsome cat, but claw he never would;
> He only bit the ones he loved, because they tasted good." S. Greenfield

Fungus?  I thought fungus was a plant.  Also, I don't think there is an
'etc.' where monotremes are concerned.  I'm pretty sure the platypus and the
echidna are the only monotremes in existence.

Joy

 
 
 

Possum babies move into baby's house!

Post by Debbie Wils » Sat, 21 Apr 2012 03:23:16


Quote:

> Fungus?  I thought fungus was a plant.  Also, I don't think there is an
> 'etc.' where monotremes are concerned.  I'm pretty sure the platypus and the
> echidna are the only monotremes in existence.

Hi Joy,

Fungi are definitely not plants - they have a kingdom of their own. One
major difference is that fungi do not posses the ability to make their
own food, unlike most plants which use photosynthesis to create food
using sunlight. You are right about the monotremes - one platypus and
two echidna species are all that exist in the present day.

Deb. (with her biologist hat on)
--
http://www.scientific-art.com

"He looked a fierce and quarrelsome cat, but claw he never would;
He only bit the ones he loved, because they tasted good." S. Greenfield