Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

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Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Clar » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 08:58:25



Hello, all,
I lurk on this group frequently and post sporadically.  I had an
experience with a vet today, and I need a reality check from other cat
owners.

I have been going to the same veterinary practice for about 20 years,
know the main vet well, and have taken many cats through there, and
made many reccomendations to that practice over the years.  The owner
of the clinic has remained the same; the other vets there, usually
two, change with time.  This is the first time I've had any problems
with any of them, but not the first time I've had a problem with this
one.

A year ago I adopted a very fearful and skittish stray that I'd been
feeding on my deck (unable to catch) for two years.  He was injured
and I managed to nab him, had him examined and neutered (at half price
by that vet practice, because he was a stray) and kept him despite
already having four geriatric cats.  I didn't plan to, but couldn't
find him a home, and my heart went out to  him, especially after we
felt a lump that we believe to be a shotgun pellet.

In the year I've had him inside, he has turned into a very
affectionate cat--toward me and my other cats--just very, very timid
toward others.  When I took him to the vet for his shots not long ago,
that vet (not the one I'm mad at) noticed a bad tooth, and said it
probably needed extraction. He said he usually did the dental work on
Tuesdays.  This morning I dropped the cat off, opted to have the $40
*** work done before what I thought would be extracting one tooth,
opted for the $20 microchip as well--and this on a very, very tight
budget. And I have three other geriatric cats.  My work phone number
was clearly written on the form.

When I went to pick him up after work, I was directed into an exam
room where th vet that I don't like, and have had problems with before
(she's probably a good vet, just does NOT communicate with owners; I
think she figures she knows what's best and doesn't want to be
confused by someone who actually knows the animal) ) informed me that
she'd had to do SO MUCH dental work that the cat was in extreme pain,
and that at no charge to me, if I wanted to,  they'd keep him
overnight so he could get another pain shot and antibiotic shot in the
morning.

 Never mind the inconvenience of having left work early to get the
cat--I AM FURIOUS that so much and such obviously painful dental work
was done without even a phone call to discuss it with me.  Maybe the
cat needed it all, maybe not.  This poor guy has no reason to trust
humans and every reason not to. Had I known this vet was doing the
dental work today, I would not have taken the cat in today.  Even so,
when she discovered that he needed such extensive work (if he did) she
could have phoned me at work to discuss it with me--the phone number
was right there, in two places, on the chart . (I know the
receptionists and techs there pretty well, too and I asked and
expressed my displeasure when I left today)  I would have discussed it
with the primary vet, whom I've known for so long, but he was doing a
euthanasia on someone else's cat, and that's tough on vet and owner.

I don't know whether my poor guy really "needed" all that dental work
or not. Maybe he did, maybe he didn't. But I feel very strongly that
it should have been discussed with me.  If I'd taken my CAR into the
shop and they'd had to do a lot more work than anticipated, the shop
would have called me, and the car feels no pain.  I just don't know
that I would have subjected that cat to what apparently is a whole lot
of pain just when he's begun to trust.  And I am a bit suspicious of
this "we'll keep him overnight at no cost to you" stuff.

Am I wrong to be so furious?  

This vet made single handed medical decisions without consulting me,
and without knowing the cat.  She has never treated him.

  She left a phone message -- on my home phone-- only AFTER all the
work had been done to tell me that they might want to keep the cat
overnight. (Of course, I never got the message until after I got home
from the vet)   When the receptionist and I looked at the chart, it
was harder to find my home phone number than my work phone number.
It's very clear to me that she just chose not to call me.

The cost is much higher than I anticipated as well, though I always
find a way to pay if the cats need care.  She had also added a charge
for clipping his claws--despite the fact that one of the other vets
there did it three weeks ago when he examined him, and the fact that I
am capable of doing that at home.  Again, without asking me.

I have to believe that she has nothing to gain monetarily from all of
this, and I still trust the vet that owns the practice, and I plan to
have a long talk with him.

But I am SEETHING.  I can't find anyway to justify her doing all of
that without discussing it with me. Had I known she was doing the
work, I would have asked that another vet there also look at the cat's
mouth and agree the work needed to be done.  Maybe that's what she
figured.

Comments?

Thank you for letting me vent, if nothing else.

Clare

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by SBroad23 » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 09:25:26


Talk with your primary vet there, and tell him/her of your feelings.

The vet should have called you.  I would be outraged.

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Karen Chupli » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 09:33:11




Quote:
> Hello, all,
> I lurk on this group frequently and post sporadically.  I had an
> experience with a vet today, and I need a reality check from other cat
> owners.

> I have been going to the same veterinary practice for about 20 years,
> know the main vet well, and have taken many cats through there, and
> made many reccomendations to that practice over the years.  The owner
> of the clinic has remained the same; the other vets there, usually
> two, change with time.  This is the first time I've had any problems
> with any of them, but not the first time I've had a problem with this
> one.

> A year ago I adopted a very fearful and skittish stray that I'd been
> feeding on my deck (unable to catch) for two years.  He was injured
> and I managed to nab him, had him examined and neutered (at half price
> by that vet practice, because he was a stray) and kept him despite
> already having four geriatric cats.  I didn't plan to, but couldn't
> find him a home, and my heart went out to  him, especially after we
> felt a lump that we believe to be a shotgun pellet.

> In the year I've had him inside, he has turned into a very
> affectionate cat--toward me and my other cats--just very, very timid
> toward others.  When I took him to the vet for his shots not long ago,
> that vet (not the one I'm mad at) noticed a bad tooth, and said it
> probably needed extraction. He said he usually did the dental work on
> Tuesdays.  This morning I dropped the cat off, opted to have the $40
> *** work done before what I thought would be extracting one tooth,
> opted for the $20 microchip as well--and this on a very, very tight
> budget. And I have three other geriatric cats.  My work phone number
> was clearly written on the form.

> When I went to pick him up after work, I was directed into an exam
> room where th vet that I don't like, and have had problems with before
> (she's probably a good vet, just does NOT communicate with owners; I
> think she figures she knows what's best and doesn't want to be
> confused by someone who actually knows the animal) ) informed me that
> she'd had to do SO MUCH dental work that the cat was in extreme pain,
> and that at no charge to me, if I wanted to,  they'd keep him
> overnight so he could get another pain shot and antibiotic shot in the
> morning.

> Never mind the inconvenience of having left work early to get the
> cat--I AM FURIOUS that so much and such obviously painful dental work
> was done without even a phone call to discuss it with me.  Maybe the
> cat needed it all, maybe not.  This poor guy has no reason to trust
> humans and every reason not to. Had I known this vet was doing the
> dental work today, I would not have taken the cat in today.  Even so,
> when she discovered that he needed such extensive work (if he did) she
> could have phoned me at work to discuss it with me--the phone number
> was right there, in two places, on the chart . (I know the
> receptionists and techs there pretty well, too and I asked and
> expressed my displeasure when I left today)  I would have discussed it
> with the primary vet, whom I've known for so long, but he was doing a
> euthanasia on someone else's cat, and that's tough on vet and owner.

> I don't know whether my poor guy really "needed" all that dental work
> or not. Maybe he did, maybe he didn't. But I feel very strongly that
> it should have been discussed with me.  If I'd taken my CAR into the
> shop and they'd had to do a lot more work than anticipated, the shop
> would have called me, and the car feels no pain.  I just don't know
> that I would have subjected that cat to what apparently is a whole lot
> of pain just when he's begun to trust.  And I am a bit suspicious of
> this "we'll keep him overnight at no cost to you" stuff.

> Am I wrong to be so furious?

> This vet made single handed medical decisions without consulting me,
> and without knowing the cat.  She has never treated him.

> She left a phone message -- on my home phone-- only AFTER all the
> work had been done to tell me that they might want to keep the cat
> overnight. (Of course, I never got the message until after I got home
> from the vet)   When the receptionist and I looked at the chart, it
> was harder to find my home phone number than my work phone number.
> It's very clear to me that she just chose not to call me.

> The cost is much higher than I anticipated as well, though I always
> find a way to pay if the cats need care.  She had also added a charge
> for clipping his claws--despite the fact that one of the other vets
> there did it three weeks ago when he examined him, and the fact that I
> am capable of doing that at home.  Again, without asking me.

> I have to believe that she has nothing to gain monetarily from all of
> this, and I still trust the vet that owns the practice, and I plan to
> have a long talk with him.

> But I am SEETHING.  I can't find anyway to justify her doing all of
> that without discussing it with me. Had I known she was doing the
> work, I would have asked that another vet there also look at the cat's
> mouth and agree the work needed to be done.  Maybe that's what she
> figured.

> Comments?

> Thank you for letting me vent, if nothing else.

> Clare

I know for sure that my vet WOULD have consulted me first. I can't
understand them not talking about it to you.

Karen

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Jason » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 09:39:52


I agree with you 100% it seems like money is what most vets are looking
for is their pratice does the vet have very many clients? How long has
she work there? Maybe she trying to impress her boss.
 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Mar » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 11:24:33


Quote:
>Comments?

I believe you are correct for feeling upset. I think the vets office should
have called you at work and told you about the cat's condition, what needed to
be done and costs. I bet you would have said yes to the work. I think the
office was just being a little lazy and not thinking by not calling you at
work. I don't think they were trying to make extra money off of you. Maybe it
was the vets receptionists fault for not leaving the message also at work. In
the future I'd probably spell everything out to the vet, vet tech and
receptionist so they will call you at work, give you estimate of work and price
ahead of time and wait for your okay. Here in CA, USA they legally must give
you estimate before they do the work. Generally they will give you an estimate
range before they start surgery in case they run into these things. When I had
dental work done on my cat they said if they just remove two incisors, it's so
much but if they have to remove four incisors, it's this much more. It's kind
of tough to stop surgery to call someone, leave a message and wait for a
response.
 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Cathy Friedman » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 11:55:59



Quote:
> >Comments?

> I believe you are correct for feeling upset. I think the vets office
should
> have called you at work and told you about the cat's condition, what
needed to
> be done and costs. I bet you would have said yes to the work. I think the
> office was just being a little lazy and not thinking by not calling you at
> work. I don't think they were trying to make extra money off of you. Maybe
it
> was the vets receptionists fault for not leaving the message also at work.
In
> the future I'd probably spell everything out to the vet, vet tech and
> receptionist so they will call you at work, give you estimate of work and
price
> ahead of time and wait for your okay. Here in CA, USA they legally must
give
> you estimate before they do the work. Generally they will give you an
estimate
> range before they start surgery in case they run into these things. When I
had
> dental work done on my cat they said if they just remove two incisors,
it's so
> much but if they have to remove four incisors, it's this much more. It's
kind
> of tough to stop surgery to call someone, leave a message and wait for a
> response.

Yes, this is my take, too.  I brought one of my cats in for dental work
once, when the vet told me that she knew at least 2 teeth needed to be
extracted.  She called me after the op, & said "I have good news & a little
not so good news.  Debbie's doing just fine, but when I got in her
mouth,working along, I discovered that I needed to pull 5 of her teeth!" &
she explained that they really needed to be out of there, then.  Otherwise,
it would've meant yet another dental procedure in the not-to-distant future
from that date to make Debbie comfortable & healthier.  I thought that was
reasonable.

Cathy

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Clar » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 12:34:03


I thank you all for your responses.  I am not happy about the costs,
of course, but my bigger concern is how much work had to be done, and
how painful it is for a cat that is already terribly frightened.  And
she didn't even try to call at work; I answer my own phone and was in
the office all day.  Something so serious and painful that the cat
needs to spend the night to get additional pain meds should be
discussed if not before, at least, as in your case, Cathy, immediately
after. But if it was as bad as she made it out, good med practice and
common courtesy would have dictated a phone call, or at least a try at
one.  I'm not sure I would have had this much work done on this cat
now--I might've been willing to risk another anesthesia later, and
maybe even more cost,  for less pain for the cat now. It should have
been my choice.  It was hard enough getting him in the carrier this
morning. I fear I'll never get him to a vet again, after all of this.
He looked awful (I decided to leave him because if his mouth is as
sore as she says it is, I won't be able to get pain med or antibiotic
into him.)  Now I have to figure out a way to get him during a workday
(I will NOT leave him there all day as well. )

 And I would NOT have selected this vet to do the work. I should have
double-checked as to who was doing the dental work today, but the
other vet always does it--I'm guessing he was on vacation.  For that I
take responsibility.  I now plan to have a note put in my chart that I
do not want her working on any of my animals unless it's specifically
cleared with me.

And my previous experience with this vet makes me think she's a "dog
person"--a small animal vet who prefers to work on dogs and actually
doesn't much like cats.  I don't like her and I don't trust her, and
in 20 years of going to this vet clinic, that's the only vet I have
ever felt this about.  She was actually talking down to
me--reprovingly-- about how badly neglected the cat's teeth had
been--she became a little sheepish when I (patiently, under the
circumstances) explained that the cat had been a stray for a very long
time.  I remain upset; a minute to try a phone call, when the number
was visible and handy, would have been a very good course.  IF she
genuinely couldn't do that, an IMMEDIATE phone call to my office after
the surgery to discuss what had to be done, and whether or not the cat
should stay the night, would at least have prevented me leaving a
meeting at work to get the cat on time, and being surprised at the
extent of the work.

I plan to have a very long talk with the owner of the practice.  I
just hope poor Cecil (the cat) will not lose trust again.

Anyway, thanks to all of you.

On Tue, 10 Aug 2004 22:55:59 -0400, "Cathy Friedmann"

Quote:



>> >Comments?

>> I believe you are correct for feeling upset. I think the vets office
>should
>> have called you at work and told you about the cat's condition, what
>needed to
>> be done and costs.
>Yes, this is my take, too.  I brought one of my cats in for dental work
>once, when the vet told me that she knew at least 2 teeth needed to be
>extracted.  She called me after the op, & said "I have good news & a little
>not so good news.  Debbie's doing just fine, but when I got in her
>mouth,working along, I discovered that I needed to pull 5 of her teeth!" &
>she explained that they really needed to be out of there, then.  Otherwise,
>it would've meant yet another dental procedure in the not-to-distant future
>from that date to make Debbie comfortable & healthier.  I thought that was
>reasonable.

>Cathy

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Kelly » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:00:04



Quote:
> I thank you all for your responses.  I am not happy about the costs,
> of course, but my bigger concern is how much work had to be done, and
> how painful it is for a cat that is already terribly frightened.  And
> she didn't even try to call at work; I answer my own phone and was in
> the office all day.  Something so serious and painful that the cat
> needs to spend the night to get additional pain meds should be
> discussed if not before, at least, as in your case, Cathy, immediately
> after. But if it was as bad as she made it out, good med practice and
> common courtesy would have dictated a phone call, or at least a try at
> one.  I'm not sure I would have had this much work done on this cat
> now--I might've been willing to risk another anesthesia later, and
> maybe even more cost,  for less pain for the cat now. It should have
> been my choice.  It was hard enough getting him in the carrier this
> morning. I fear I'll never get him to a vet again, after all of this.
> He looked awful (I decided to leave him because if his mouth is as
> sore as she says it is, I won't be able to get pain med or antibiotic
> into him.)  Now I have to figure out a way to get him during a workday
> (I will NOT leave him there all day as well. )

>  And I would NOT have selected this vet to do the work. I should have
> double-checked as to who was doing the dental work today, but the
> other vet always does it--I'm guessing he was on vacation.  For that I
> take responsibility.  I now plan to have a note put in my chart that I
> do not want her working on any of my animals unless it's specifically
> cleared with me.

> And my previous experience with this vet makes me think she's a "dog
> person"--a small animal vet who prefers to work on dogs and actually
> doesn't much like cats.  I don't like her and I don't trust her, and
> in 20 years of going to this vet clinic, that's the only vet I have
> ever felt this about.  She was actually talking down to
> me--reprovingly-- about how badly neglected the cat's teeth had
> been--she became a little sheepish when I (patiently, under the
> circumstances) explained that the cat had been a stray for a very long
> time.  I remain upset; a minute to try a phone call, when the number
> was visible and handy, would have been a very good course.  IF she
> genuinely couldn't do that, an IMMEDIATE phone call to my office after
> the surgery to discuss what had to be done, and whether or not the cat
> should stay the night, would at least have prevented me leaving a
> meeting at work to get the cat on time, and being surprised at the
> extent of the work.

> I plan to have a very long talk with the owner of the practice.  I
> just hope poor Cecil (the cat) will not lose trust again.

> Anyway, thanks to all of you.

I'm sorry your guy had to go through so much today.  However, vets often
don't know how extensive a dental is going to be until they are in there.
This should have been explained to you ahead of time.  My vet always
provides an estimate.  Since she probably didn't know how much work was
involved until he was under anesthesia, it would not have been practical for
her to step out of surgery and call you.  I agree that it sounds like this
vet is not the best communicator.  She should have called after the surgery
to tell you about it.  Take heart that even though Cecil is in pain now, it
is better to get this over with all at once than to make him go under twice.

--
-Kelly
kelly at farringtons dot net
www.kelltek.com
Check out www.snittens.com

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Karen Chupli » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:46:03



wrote on 8/10/04 11:00 PM:

Quote:


>> I thank you all for your responses.  I am not happy about the costs,
>> of course, but my bigger concern is how much work had to be done, and
>> how painful it is for a cat that is already terribly frightened.  And
>> she didn't even try to call at work; I answer my own phone and was in
>> the office all day.  Something so serious and painful that the cat
>> needs to spend the night to get additional pain meds should be
>> discussed if not before, at least, as in your case, Cathy, immediately
>> after. But if it was as bad as she made it out, good med practice and
>> common courtesy would have dictated a phone call, or at least a try at
>> one.  I'm not sure I would have had this much work done on this cat
>> now--I might've been willing to risk another anesthesia later, and
>> maybe even more cost,  for less pain for the cat now. It should have
>> been my choice.  It was hard enough getting him in the carrier this
>> morning. I fear I'll never get him to a vet again, after all of this.
>> He looked awful (I decided to leave him because if his mouth is as
>> sore as she says it is, I won't be able to get pain med or antibiotic
>> into him.)  Now I have to figure out a way to get him during a workday
>> (I will NOT leave him there all day as well. )

>> And I would NOT have selected this vet to do the work. I should have
>> double-checked as to who was doing the dental work today, but the
>> other vet always does it--I'm guessing he was on vacation.  For that I
>> take responsibility.  I now plan to have a note put in my chart that I
>> do not want her working on any of my animals unless it's specifically
>> cleared with me.

>> And my previous experience with this vet makes me think she's a "dog
>> person"--a small animal vet who prefers to work on dogs and actually
>> doesn't much like cats.  I don't like her and I don't trust her, and
>> in 20 years of going to this vet clinic, that's the only vet I have
>> ever felt this about.  She was actually talking down to
>> me--reprovingly-- about how badly neglected the cat's teeth had
>> been--she became a little sheepish when I (patiently, under the
>> circumstances) explained that the cat had been a stray for a very long
>> time.  I remain upset; a minute to try a phone call, when the number
>> was visible and handy, would have been a very good course.  IF she
>> genuinely couldn't do that, an IMMEDIATE phone call to my office after
>> the surgery to discuss what had to be done, and whether or not the cat
>> should stay the night, would at least have prevented me leaving a
>> meeting at work to get the cat on time, and being surprised at the
>> extent of the work.

>> I plan to have a very long talk with the owner of the practice.  I
>> just hope poor Cecil (the cat) will not lose trust again.

>> Anyway, thanks to all of you.

> I'm sorry your guy had to go through so much today.  However, vets often
> don't know how extensive a dental is going to be until they are in there.
> This should have been explained to you ahead of time.  My vet always
> provides an estimate.  Since she probably didn't know how much work was
> involved until he was under anesthesia, it would not have been practical for
> her to step out of surgery and call you.  I agree that it sounds like this
> vet is not the best communicator.  She should have called after the surgery
> to tell you about it.  Take heart that even though Cecil is in pain now, it
> is better to get this over with all at once than to make him go under twice.

And it *does* get better pretty quickly. When Grant had his teeth out, my
vet did keep him a couple of days, but I will say he rebounded mighty quick.
I know his gums have felt and been much better. I do not think that trust
will be an issue. YOU didn't give her the pain. You weren't there and you
will be seen as "rescuer" to her when you pick her up. I agree that the
owner should be talked too. I think this vet needs a few intrapersonal
communication seminars.
 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Cathy Friedman » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:53:48



Quote:

> wrote on 8/10/04 11:00 PM:

 Take heart that even though Cecil is in pain now, it
Quote:
> > is better to get this over with all at once than to make him go under
twice.

> And it *does* get better pretty quickly. When Grant had his teeth out, my
> vet did keep him a couple of days, but I will say he rebounded mighty

quick.

Definitely.  In humans, the mouth is the quickest to heal; may be true of
other animals, too.  Debbie was eating -dry food, no less! - the day after
her 5 extractions.  The vet had said that she may want only wet food for a
while, but nope, she ignored the wet food, & went right for the dry, happily
eating...  Besides, if *I'd* had 5 absecessed teeth - that were finally out
of my mouth, I'd be a mighty happy camper, too! ;-)  (Just *one* bad tooth
can be extremely painful.)

Cathy

Quote:
> I know his gums have felt and been much better. I do not think that trust
> will be an issue. YOU didn't give her the pain. You weren't there and you
> will be seen as "rescuer" to her when you pick her up. I agree that the
> owner should be talked too. I think this vet needs a few intrapersonal
> communication seminars.

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by RobZi » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 14:52:22



Quote:
> >Comments?

> I believe you are correct for feeling upset.
>I think the
> office was just being a little lazy and not thinking by not calling you at
> work. I don't think they were trying to make extra money off of you.

I would be inclined to agree if it were not for the 'slamming' of
non-essential charges for such things as nail clipping. That just reeks of a
sort of arrogance I wouldn't handle very well besides showing no regard for
the cats owner. Doing more than was originally discussed might be
erroneously construed as gouging but tacking on a claw trim just about
removes any doubt
 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by RobZi » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 14:59:03



Quote:
>However, vets often don't know how extensive a dental is going to be until

they are in >there.

HELLLOOOO!! The other vet had previously examined the cat. The difference
between the expectation of one extraction and exetnsive work is quite a
large difference indeed. It isn't like the vet only had a verbal description
with no hands on exam to go by in preparing the owner for what was to come.

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by -L. » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 16:01:31


Quote:

> Hello, all,
> I lurk on this group frequently and post sporadically.  I had an
> experience with a vet today, and I need a reality check from other cat
> owners.

> I have been going to the same veterinary practice for about 20 years,
> know the main vet well, and have taken many cats through there, and
> made many reccomendations to that practice over the years.  The owner
> of the clinic has remained the same; the other vets there, usually
> two, change with time.  This is the first time I've had any problems
> with any of them, but not the first time I've had a problem with this
> one.

> A year ago I adopted a very fearful and skittish stray that I'd been
> feeding on my deck (unable to catch) for two years.  He was injured
> and I managed to nab him, had him examined and neutered (at half price
> by that vet practice, because he was a stray) and kept him despite
> already having four geriatric cats.  I didn't plan to, but couldn't
> find him a home, and my heart went out to  him, especially after we
> felt a lump that we believe to be a shotgun pellet.

> In the year I've had him inside, he has turned into a very
> affectionate cat--toward me and my other cats--just very, very timid
> toward others.  When I took him to the vet for his shots not long ago,
> that vet (not the one I'm mad at) noticed a bad tooth, and said it
> probably needed extraction. He said he usually did the dental work on
> Tuesdays.  This morning I dropped the cat off, opted to have the $40
> *** work done before what I thought would be extracting one tooth,
> opted for the $20 microchip as well--and this on a very, very tight
> budget. And I have three other geriatric cats.  My work phone number
> was clearly written on the form.

> When I went to pick him up after work, I was directed into an exam
> room where th vet that I don't like, and have had problems with before
> (she's probably a good vet, just does NOT communicate with owners; I
> think she figures she knows what's best and doesn't want to be
> confused by someone who actually knows the animal) ) informed me that
> she'd had to do SO MUCH dental work that the cat was in extreme pain,
> and that at no charge to me, if I wanted to,  they'd keep him
> overnight so he could get another pain shot and antibiotic shot in the
> morning.

>  Never mind the inconvenience of having left work early to get the
> cat--I AM FURIOUS that so much and such obviously painful dental work
> was done without even a phone call to discuss it with me.  

I worked at a high-volume cat specialty hospital.  This is the fault
of the receptionist.  She should have been *extremely* explicit about
what your desires were.  Usually a regular dental cleaning is done
with the extraction.  That should have been made clear to you.
Usually it is 15-20$ per tooth extracted, sometimes more.  This should
have been made clear to you as well.

Maybe the

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> cat needed it all, maybe not.  This poor guy has no reason to trust
> humans and every reason not to. Had I known this vet was doing the
> dental work today, I would not have taken the cat in today.  Even so,
> when she discovered that he needed such extensive work (if he did) she
> could have phoned me at work to discuss it with me--the phone number
> was right there, in two places, on the chart . (I know the
> receptionists and techs there pretty well, too and I asked and
> expressed my displeasure when I left today)  I would have discussed it
> with the primary vet, whom I've known for so long, but he was doing a
> euthanasia on someone else's cat, and that's tough on vet and owner.

> I don't know whether my poor guy really "needed" all that dental work
> or not. Maybe he did, maybe he didn't. But I feel very strongly that
> it should have been discussed with me.  If I'd taken my CAR into the
> shop and they'd had to do a lot more work than anticipated, the shop
> would have called me, and the car feels no pain.  I just don't know
> that I would have subjected that cat to what apparently is a whole lot
> of pain just when he's begun to trust.  And I am a bit suspicious of
> this "we'll keep him overnight at no cost to you" stuff.

The cat probably didn't tolerate the anesthesia well and needed to
stay overnight.

Quote:

> Am I wrong to be so furious?  

No.

Quote:
> This vet made single handed medical decisions without consulting me,
> and without knowing the cat.  She has never treated him.

>   She left a phone message -- on my home phone-- only AFTER all the
> work had been done to tell me that they might want to keep the cat
> overnight.

That's not unusual - you never can tell how a cat can react during or
after a procedure.

 (Of course, I never got the message until after I got home

Quote:
> from the vet)   When the receptionist and I looked at the chart, it
> was harder to find my home phone number than my work phone number.
> It's very clear to me that she just chose not to call me.

> The cost is much higher than I anticipated as well, though I always
> find a way to pay if the cats need care.  She had also added a charge
> for clipping his claws--despite the fact that one of the other vets
> there did it three weeks ago when he examined him, and the fact that I
> am capable of doing that at home.  Again, without asking me.

The nail trim should have been free of charge, if he was under
anesthesia.

Quote:

> I have to believe that she has nothing to gain monetarily from all of
> this, and I still trust the vet that owns the practice, and I plan to
> have a long talk with him.

You should.

Quote:

> But I am SEETHING.  I can't find anyway to justify her doing all of
> that without discussing it with me. Had I known she was doing the
> work, I would have asked that another vet there also look at the cat's
> mouth and agree the work needed to be done.  Maybe that's what she
> figured.

> Comments?

Cat probably needed the dental work, but obviously they were swamped
and the phone call to you wasn't done.  The receptionist is at fault,
IMO.  We never did a carte-blanche procedure on a cat unless we were
*extremely* clearly instructed to do so by the owner.  We called if
the cat needed anything extra - but again, the receptionists are
supposed to clarify these instructions, and when in doubt, we called.

-L.

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by Phil P » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 20:27:12



.

Quote:

> Am I wrong to be so furious?

No, from your point of view, and yes from a rational (and the cat's) point
of view.

The cat was already under anesthesia and the vet had already begun the first
extraction.  Would you rather the vet stop the procedure and prolong the
anesthesia and bleeding times - which could lead to complications - possibly
fatal, to call you, then start the procedure all over again?

The other alternative would be reschedule another appointment to finish the
job - which means another stressful trip for the cat, anesthetizing the cat
for a *second* time and subjecting the cat to additional anesthetic risks,
and subjecting the cat to another healing process, and leaving the cat in
pain in the meantime.

 Now for you:  You would have to make another *two* trips (drop off and pick
up the cat), pay for another visit, pay for another anesthesia, and another
OR charge (that's usually built into the bill).

Think about after you cool down a bit.

Phil

 
 
 

Furious at Vet: Am I right to be?

Post by There » Thu, 12 Aug 2004 21:38:09


Quote:

> Hello, all,
> I lurk on this group frequently and post sporadically.  I had an
> experience with a vet today, and I need a reality check from other cat
> owners.

> I have been going to the same veterinary practice for about 20 years,
> know the main vet well, and have taken many cats through there, and
> made many reccomendations to that practice over the years.  The owner
> of the clinic has remained the same; the other vets there, usually
> two, change with time.  This is the first time I've had any problems
> with any of them, but not the first time I've had a problem with this
> one.

> A year ago I adopted a very fearful and skittish stray that I'd been
> feeding on my deck (unable to catch) for two years.  He was injured
> and I managed to nab him, had him examined and neutered (at half price
> by that vet practice, because he was a stray) and kept him despite
> already having four geriatric cats.  I didn't plan to, but couldn't
> find him a home, and my heart went out to  him, especially after we
> felt a lump that we believe to be a shotgun pellet.

> In the year I've had him inside, he has turned into a very
> affectionate cat--toward me and my other cats--just very, very timid
> toward others.  When I took him to the vet for his shots not long ago,
> that vet (not the one I'm mad at) noticed a bad tooth, and said it
> probably needed extraction. He said he usually did the dental work on
> Tuesdays.  This morning I dropped the cat off, opted to have the $40
> *** work done before what I thought would be extracting one tooth,
> opted for the $20 microchip as well--and this on a very, very tight
> budget. And I have three other geriatric cats.  My work phone number
> was clearly written on the form.

> When I went to pick him up after work, I was directed into an exam
> room where th vet that I don't like, and have had problems with before
> (she's probably a good vet, just does NOT communicate with owners; I
> think she figures she knows what's best and doesn't want to be
> confused by someone who actually knows the animal) ) informed me that
> she'd had to do SO MUCH dental work that the cat was in extreme pain,
> and that at no charge to me, if I wanted to,  they'd keep him
> overnight so he could get another pain shot and antibiotic shot in the
> morning.

>  Never mind the inconvenience of having left work early to get the
> cat--I AM FURIOUS that so much and such obviously painful dental work
> was done without even a phone call to discuss it with me.  Maybe the
> cat needed it all, maybe not.  This poor guy has no reason to trust
> humans and every reason not to. Had I known this vet was doing the
> dental work today, I would not have taken the cat in today.  Even so,
> when she discovered that he needed such extensive work (if he did) she
> could have phoned me at work to discuss it with me--the phone number
> was right there, in two places, on the chart . (I know the
> receptionists and techs there pretty well, too and I asked and
> expressed my displeasure when I left today)  I would have discussed it
> with the primary vet, whom I've known for so long, but he was doing a
> euthanasia on someone else's cat, and that's tough on vet and owner.

> I don't know whether my poor guy really "needed" all that dental work
> or not. Maybe he did, maybe he didn't. But I feel very strongly that
> it should have been discussed with me.  If I'd taken my CAR into the
> shop and they'd had to do a lot more work than anticipated, the shop
> would have called me, and the car feels no pain.  I just don't know
> that I would have subjected that cat to what apparently is a whole lot
> of pain just when he's begun to trust.  And I am a bit suspicious of
> this "we'll keep him overnight at no cost to you" stuff.

> Am I wrong to be so furious?  

> This vet made single handed medical decisions without consulting me,
> and without knowing the cat.  She has never treated him.

>   She left a phone message -- on my home phone-- only AFTER all the
> work had been done to tell me that they might want to keep the cat
> overnight. (Of course, I never got the message until after I got home
> from the vet)   When the receptionist and I looked at the chart, it
> was harder to find my home phone number than my work phone number.
> It's very clear to me that she just chose not to call me.

> The cost is much higher than I anticipated as well, though I always
> find a way to pay if the cats need care.  She had also added a charge
> for clipping his claws--despite the fact that one of the other vets
> there did it three weeks ago when he examined him, and the fact that I
> am capable of doing that at home.  Again, without asking me.

> I have to believe that she has nothing to gain monetarily from all of
> this, and I still trust the vet that owns the practice, and I plan to
> have a long talk with him.

> But I am SEETHING.  I can't find anyway to justify her doing all of
> that without discussing it with me. Had I known she was doing the
> work, I would have asked that another vet there also look at the cat's
> mouth and agree the work needed to be done.  Maybe that's what she
> figured.

> Comments?

> Thank you for letting me vent, if nothing else.

> Clare

Are you by any chance in Western New York? I USED to go a vet that had
a loud mouthed presumptious, know it all vet that would do ***like
this one. What nerve! I would definitely talk to the main vet but when
I did he stuck up for the crackpot. You might have to go elsewhere. I
did.