Once again allergy question

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Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Sun, 04 Aug 2002 12:50:09



OK. I am just having a ROTTEN time figuring out Grant's allergies. He is not
as "twitchy" like when this began, but now he has begun to*** bald a spot
on the inside of his arm and there is a bald spot on his tummy around a
***. That spot does not seem to be self***ed. Tonight he was running
around playing and there was suddenly four clumps of tummy hair on the
ground, as though it had just fallen out. His tail has also thinned out,
though it has no bald spots (knock on wood, spit over my shoulder). It's so
exasperating. Is it inhalent? Is it food induced?? Since he had urinary
trouble I am reluctant to try a full blown z/d test as that is dry food. I
will say, he is drinking fine ( I see him drink two or three times a day
from his dishes) now that I put out more bowls and moved them to another
part of the room. I REALLY think there was a fear of going into the room
where the cat box was. They both exclusively use the box that I put in the
bedroom now. I think he was "holding" it. I do not know what else to do. If
anyone has any suggestions I'd love to hear some.

TIA

Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Steve Cran » Sun, 04 Aug 2002 13:35:21


Karen,
    You should be fine on z/d. Urine pH output is 6.2-6.4, magnesium is very
low. It would at least give you some answers. If your kitty does not improve
within 4-6 weeks, then food is not the problem and you can begin looking
elsewhere.
    You can also make a "canned" food out of the dry food by taking the
kitchen food processor, grinding the food down to a granular level and
adding water. You won't hurt the food nor change the properties of the food
by doing this.


Quote:
> OK. I am just having a ROTTEN time figuring out Grant's allergies. He is
not
> as "twitchy" like when this began, but now he has begun to*** bald a
spot
> on the inside of his arm and there is a bald spot on his tummy around a
> ***. That spot does not seem to be self***ed. Tonight he was running
> around playing and there was suddenly four clumps of tummy hair on the
> ground, as though it had just fallen out. His tail has also thinned out,
> though it has no bald spots (knock on wood, spit over my shoulder). It's
so
> exasperating. Is it inhalent? Is it food induced?? Since he had urinary
> trouble I am reluctant to try a full blown z/d test as that is dry food. I
> will say, he is drinking fine ( I see him drink two or three times a day
> from his dishes) now that I put out more bowls and moved them to another
> part of the room. I REALLY think there was a fear of going into the room
> where the cat box was. They both exclusively use the box that I put in the
> bedroom now. I think he was "holding" it. I do not know what else to do.
If
> anyone has any suggestions I'd love to hear some.

> TIA

> Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Sun, 04 Aug 2002 23:03:11




Quote:
> Karen,
> You should be fine on z/d. Urine pH output is 6.2-6.4, magnesium is very
> low. It would at least give you some answers. If your kitty does not improve
> within 4-6 weeks, then food is not the problem and you can begin looking
> elsewhere.
> You can also make a "canned" food out of the dry food by taking the
> kitchen food processor, grinding the food down to a granular level and
> adding water. You won't hurt the food nor change the properties of the food
> by doing this.

This is good to know. Thank you. Although, I dont know if they would eat it
that way. They are not all too keen on it. Most indications seem to be an
inhalant allergy. I've been thinking maybe I just need to really start
tossing stuff. I have too much stuff anyway. I *wish* I could toss the
carpet. It's everywhere. But I rent so I can't do that. Someone wrote me
about their cat that had truly horrible problems from allergies. At least so
far it seems mostly annoying to Grant. It is nice to know though about the
food. I just read the low ph food I was given and jeez, the first damn
ingrediant is corn grits. I mean, come ON. Corn grits????? Unfortunately,
they won't touch the c/d (why did they change that. I had a cat on c/d in
college and he loved it. I know it was a little higher in fat but it
couldn't have been THAT bad. I know they would have eaten the old formula.)

Thanks for the info Steve. Puts my mind at rest in case I have to do the
food trial deal.

Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by PawsForThoug » Sun, 04 Aug 2002 23:23:20


Quote:

>Thanks for the info Steve. Puts my mind at rest in case I have to do the
>food trial deal.

Hi Karen, have you tried the IVD allergy food?  I believe it was Anna who used
the Science Diet but her cats didn't like it or it didn't work, but then she
had success with the IVD food.  

It does sound like Grant's problem may be inhalant rather than food.  Have you
thought about taking him to a holistic vet?  My Meesha has asthma and the
holistic vet has helped her a lot.  If you're interested, they have a state by
state directory at www.altvetmed.com

Lauren

_________
=^..^=
Sandpaper kisses on a cheek or a chin-that is the way for a day to  begin!
See my cats:   http://www.picturetrail.com/mickey4paws/703043

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Sun, 04 Aug 2002 23:47:07




Quote:
> www.altvetmed.com

None, in my state.

Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Steve Cran » Mon, 05 Aug 2002 03:16:35


Hi Karen,
    Prescription Diet c/d-s was changed about five years ago to reduce the
fat levels. High levels of fat are one way to lower urine pH levels. The
problem was a whole lot of, Ahem shall we say "chunky" c/d kitties.
    Corn is great carbohydrate. The carbohydrate fraction is as digestible
as any other grain and the protein fraction is the most digestible of any
grain. It contains 5 times the levels of Omega fatty acids as rice and is 20
times less likely to be an allergen than wheat.
    Sometimes we forget that animals need the amino acids that proteins
provide, not the protein itself. Cats are obligate carnivores and therefore
require specific proteins to provide specific amino acids. That doesn't mean
they cannot utilize amino acids from carbohydrate sources like corn equally
as well. It just means they have to have a broader array of protein sources
to insure that the entire range of amino acids required by the cat are
present in quantity.
    Another FLUTD diet you might try is Prescription Diet t/d. It is an
excellent struvite diet, keeps the teeth clean and is the best hairball diet
around.


Quote:


> > Karen,
> > You should be fine on z/d. Urine pH output is 6.2-6.4, magnesium is very
> > low. It would at least give you some answers. If your kitty does not
improve
> > within 4-6 weeks, then food is not the problem and you can begin looking
> > elsewhere.
> > You can also make a "canned" food out of the dry food by taking the
> > kitchen food processor, grinding the food down to a granular level and
> > adding water. You won't hurt the food nor change the properties of the
food
> > by doing this.

> This is good to know. Thank you. Although, I dont know if they would eat
it
> that way. They are not all too keen on it. Most indications seem to be an
> inhalant allergy. I've been thinking maybe I just need to really start
> tossing stuff. I have too much stuff anyway. I *wish* I could toss the
> carpet. It's everywhere. But I rent so I can't do that. Someone wrote me
> about their cat that had truly horrible problems from allergies. At least
so
> far it seems mostly annoying to Grant. It is nice to know though about the
> food. I just read the low ph food I was given and jeez, the first damn
> ingrediant is corn grits. I mean, come ON. Corn grits????? Unfortunately,
> they won't touch the c/d (why did they change that. I had a cat on c/d in
> college and he loved it. I know it was a little higher in fat but it
> couldn't have been THAT bad. I know they would have eaten the old
formula.)

> Thanks for the info Steve. Puts my mind at rest in case I have to do the
> food trial deal.

> Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Mon, 05 Aug 2002 07:06:26




Quote:
> Hi Karen,
> Prescription Diet c/d-s was changed about five years ago to reduce the
> fat levels. High levels of fat are one way to lower urine pH levels. The
> problem was a whole lot of, Ahem shall we say "chunky" c/d kitties.
> Corn is great carbohydrate. The carbohydrate fraction is as digestible
> as any other grain and the protein fraction is the most digestible of any
> grain. It contains 5 times the levels of Omega fatty acids as rice and is 20
> times less likely to be an allergen than wheat.
> Sometimes we forget that animals need the amino acids that proteins
> provide, not the protein itself. Cats are obligate carnivores and therefore
> require specific proteins to provide specific amino acids. That doesn't mean
> they cannot utilize amino acids from carbohydrate sources like corn equally
> as well. It just means they have to have a broader array of protein sources
> to insure that the entire range of amino acids required by the cat are
> present in quantity.
> Another FLUTD diet you might try is Prescription Diet t/d. It is an
> excellent struvite diet, keeps the teeth clean and is the best hairball diet
> around.

\Problem is he didn't appear to have any crystals at all, just a slightly
high pH level (7.0). I am now convinced, since he doesn't like to go into
the room where the catboxes were, that he developed a sudden fear (he IS the
original "spooked" cat) to that room and was "holding" it. Don't know if all
that would cause an elevation in pH or not. Now that there is a cat box in
the "safe haven" room (aka bedroom) both of my cats are using it almost
exclusively and he is peeing fine. However, the info is appreciated. I think
what bugs me most is the fact that GMO corn is not sold for human
consumption due to allergy problems, and yet it is produced in quantity and
me thinks pet food companies probably use it. If it is allergen causing in
humans, there is really no reason for me not to believe it might be so for
"disadvantaged" cats like Grant (he does have a poor track record immune
wise). It makes me wonder anyway. What does "t/d" stand for?

Karen

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Steve Cran » Mon, 05 Aug 2002 08:49:00



Quote:

> \Problem is he didn't appear to have any crystals at all, just a slightly
> high pH level (7.0). I am now convinced, since he doesn't like to go into
> the room where the catboxes were, that he developed a sudden fear (he IS
the
> original "spooked" cat) to that room and was "holding" it. Don't know if
all
> that would cause an elevation in pH or not. Now that there is a cat box in
> the "safe haven" room (aka bedroom) both of my cats are using it almost
> exclusively and he is peeing fine. However, the info is appreciated. I
think
> what bugs me most is the fact that GMO corn is not sold for human
> consumption due to allergy problems, and yet it is produced in quantity
and
> me thinks pet food companies probably use it. If it is allergen causing in
> humans, there is really no reason for me not to believe it might be so for
> "disadvantaged" cats like Grant (he does have a poor track record immune
> wise). It makes me wonder anyway. What does "t/d" stand for?

> Karen

    Glad to hear things are getting corrected. I have not seen any peer
reviewed published data on GMO corn. I have seen tons of "conjecture" that
anything genetically developed will in some way be harmful. To date there
has been no scientific proof of that at all, just testimonial evidence.
Sounds to me like you have the problem under control and don't need an FLUTD
diet. Watch the urine pH for awhile to make sure. The "t" in Prescription
Diet t/d stands for "tartar" or "teeth". Hill's is about out of letters so
it gets to be quite a stretch to make them mean anything at all. It was the
early research on Prescription Diet t/d in cats gave Hill's the accidental
discovery of using fiber to control hairballs in 1995.

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by MAEP » Tue, 06 Aug 2002 23:18:38


I'm sure I mentioned this before but if you prefer to feed canned, why not try
the IVD Limited Ingredient diets?  That's what my cat eats. It comes in several
varieties (lamb, rabbit, duck and venison).

Anna

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Wed, 07 Aug 2002 00:10:11


Mostly because I can't *find* it! Thanks though.

Karen


Quote:
> I'm sure I mentioned this before but if you prefer to feed canned, why not
try
> the IVD Limited Ingredient diets?  That's what my cat eats. It comes in
several
> varieties (lamb, rabbit, duck and venison).

> Anna

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by MAEP » Wed, 07 Aug 2002 00:18:51


Quote:
>Mostly because I can't *find* it! Thanks though.

Well, I get it from my vet but they also sell it at www.waggintails.com.  I
should warn, though, this food, is *very* expensive. They do offer a money-back
guarantee in case the cat won't eat it.  Still, I like the option of having a
canned food for my allergy kitty.

Anna

 
 
 

Once again allergy question

Post by Kare » Wed, 07 Aug 2002 01:14:11


That's interesting. Might be worth a try. Thanks

Karen


Quote:
> >Mostly because I can't *find* it! Thanks though.

> Well, I get it from my vet but they also sell it at www.waggintails.com.
I
> should warn, though, this food, is *very* expensive. They do offer a
money-back
> guarantee in case the cat won't eat it.  Still, I like the option of
having a
> canned food for my allergy kitty.

> Anna