Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Description of your first forum.

Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Post by Greg Lark » Sat, 23 Nov 2002 04:43:43



Hi there,

I'm sorry, but I need to vent a bit at some of the problems we have
been having with one of our cats lately.  I'm pretty annoyed with the
vets who we have been working with and am wondering if I need to see
yet another one!

Some history:  We have 2 cats, one M and one F.  Both are about 10
yrs. old.  The male cat is in generally good health, but has a heart
murmur and takes medication for it every day (Enalapril?). The female
cat had a massive anaphylactic (sp?) allergic reaction about 8 years
ago after her yearly shots were administered.  After 3 days in the
hospital and coming very close to death, she gradually got back to
normal.

About 5 years ago, she started***ing herself very frequently and
started removing the fur on her front legs and belly.  Since then,
this problem has been constantly and gradually getting worse and
worse.  Our vet in our old town and our current vet both believe that
the problem is stress-related.  About 3 months ago, we started
administering transdermal Elavil (then Buspar) to her ear every day to
reduce her stress.  The medicine did not appear to work and she
started scratching her ears so much that her fur has been removed and
they are scabbing over.

At this point, the cat has only a narrow strip of fur along her back
and some on her legs.  Everywhere else that she can reach, she has
removed the fur.

I finally snapped last week and decided to take her to a new vet.  The
new vet immediately suspected allergies and was quite surprised that
the other vets did not do any testing in this area.  Here is what she
has told us to do:

- Remove all dry food.  
- Only feed wet food from now on that does not contain fish/fish
derivatives, soy derivatives and preservatives.
- Apply medicated shampoo (Hexadene?) and cream rinse twice within a
one week period to eliminate any secondary bacterial or fungal
infection currently residing on the skin.
- Change to new cat litter that does not contain clay or any clay
products.
- Administer homeopathic anti-anxiety drops 3 times/day.

Now I also got a call from the new vet this morning and found out that
the cat has Ascrid roundworms present in her feces and we need to
administer 2 applications of medicine to treat that.  Of course, that
will need to be done to both cats.

At this point, I'm overwhelmed by the number of changes that have to
be done all at once.  Is all of this really necessary?

The unfortunate part about doing these things with this cat is the
level of difficulty of administering any kind of medicine to her.  Two
years ago, we had to give her antibiotics after a dentristry, and I
swore I would never go through that ordeal again.  It was the most
miserable 2 weeks of my life, no joke.  She foams at the mouth,
scratches, bites, squirms, etc., etc.  At this point, I am afraid that
the force required to restrain her will damage her neck or spinal
cord.  It truly has to be seen to be believed.  When we brought her in
to the new vet a couple of days ago, they could barely get a look in
her mouth even with two people and using leather gloves.  How in the

The other thing to note is that this cat does not like food enough to
be able to hide a pill in it.  She will simply refuse to eat.  Nor
does she like any of the new compounded medicines.  When we tried
that, she foamed at the mouth as soon as she saw the bottle come out.

If all of these problems are anxiety-related, aren't we only
increasing her stress level by putting her throught the hell of
administering all of these *** that are supposed to be curing the
condition?

One final note, the new vet we have gone to has very little compassion
or bedside manner.  However, she is supposed to be a cat specialist,
while our current vet is not.  I'm not jazzed about the manner in
which the new vet relates to her clients and patients, but does that
matter?  Or should you always strive to find a vet that you can work
with on a personal level?  I am much more receptive to folks in her
position saying things like "Ok, let's try this, let's try that...",
rather than "You have to do XX, you have to do YY...".  Maybe the
cat's condition justifies that kind of militant regimen, but maybe
not.  Can anyone shed some light on that?

Sorry for the long post, but I'm really not sure what to do next.
Should we jump off the cliff and try all of these things, probably
driving us and the cat completely crazy?  Or should we get yet another
opinion on these problems?  I just hate when the cat is in constant
fear of us and thinks we are only going to hurt her or try to force
medicine down her throat when we are around.

Thank you for any help,
Greg

 
 
 

Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Post by Aliso » Sat, 23 Nov 2002 05:52:30


Hi Greg ,
   Sounds like you're having a nightmare time.
If this were my cat I would stick with the new vet and try to follow her
instructions as much as possible. You can't really treat pyschological
problems (if she has any) until you treat the medical ones first .
  I've copied and pasted bits of another thread from a Uk cat group.

*It was certainly worth having the test.
Daisy doesn't have dried food. She has Feline Veterinary "Sensitivity
Control" Chicken with Rice" Selected Protein Diet" She has to have a
food with Rice in her diet as they need to have Carbohyrate as part of
their diet.
I can give her fresh Chicken and Turkey when we have that which she
really enjoys.
 This is the list of foods that they tested Daisy for to see which she
was allergic for. The Number at the side of each item is Daisy's
score.

The allergy test that Daisy had grades the results from 0 and 5.
The foods with a score of 0 she isn't allergic to and can have.
And the foods with a score of 1 to 5 is how they mark how much she has
a reaction to and the higher the number the higher the allergy.

LIST OF FOODS
MEAT FISH

BEEF 4 SALMON 0
LAMB 3 TUNA 0
DUCK 0 WHITE FISH (COD, HADDOCK ,COLEY) 1
CHICKEN 0

CEREALS

WHEAT 4
SOYABEAN 4
RICE 4
CORN ( MAIZE ) 3

OTHER

WHOLE EGG 0
COW'S MILK 3
TURKEY 0
RABBIT 2  *

   Changing the diet and litter isn't a problem but bathing is very
difficult to do . I would check the new diet you chose and if it can be
given straightaway (diets are usually changed over several days) with the
vet first .
     Ask the vet if they can bath and also worm the cat at the surgery ?
Even if it is expensive it would save you stress and the cat won't hate you.
If you have to give the pill yourself ,you could try wrapping the cat up
tightly in a towel and administer the pill with a pill applicator you can
get from the vet or a pet shop.
   HTH, Alison



Quote:
> Hi there,

> I'm sorry, but I need to vent a bit at some of the problems we have
> been having with one of our cats lately.  I'm pretty annoyed with the
> vets who we have been working with and am wondering if I need to see
> yet another one!

> Some history:  We have 2 cats, one M and one F.  Both are about 10
> yrs. old.  The male cat is in generally good health, but has a heart
> murmur and takes medication for it every day (Enalapril?). The female
> cat had a massive anaphylactic (sp?) allergic reaction about 8 years
> ago after her yearly shots were administered.  After 3 days in the
> hospital and coming very close to death, she gradually got back to
> normal.

> About 5 years ago, she started***ing herself very frequently and
> started removing the fur on her front legs and belly.  Since then,
> this problem has been constantly and gradually getting worse and
> worse.  Our vet in our old town and our current vet both believe that
> the problem is stress-related.  About 3 months ago, we started
> administering transdermal Elavil (then Buspar) to her ear every day to
> reduce her stress.  The medicine did not appear to work and she
> started scratching her ears so much that her fur has been removed and
> they are scabbing over.

> At this point, the cat has only a narrow strip of fur along her back
> and some on her legs.  Everywhere else that she can reach, she has
> removed the fur.

> I finally snapped last week and decided to take her to a new vet.  The
> new vet immediately suspected allergies and was quite surprised that
> the other vets did not do any testing in this area.  Here is what she
> has told us to do:

> - Remove all dry food.
> - Only feed wet food from now on that does not contain fish/fish
> derivatives, soy derivatives and preservatives.
> - Apply medicated shampoo (Hexadene?) and cream rinse twice within a
> one week period to eliminate any secondary bacterial or fungal
> infection currently residing on the skin.
> - Change to new cat litter that does not contain clay or any clay
> products.
> - Administer homeopathic anti-anxiety drops 3 times/day.

> Now I also got a call from the new vet this morning and found out that
> the cat has Ascrid roundworms present in her feces and we need to
> administer 2 applications of medicine to treat that.  Of course, that
> will need to be done to both cats.

> At this point, I'm overwhelmed by the number of changes that have to
> be done all at once.  Is all of this really necessary?

> The unfortunate part about doing these things with this cat is the
> level of difficulty of administering any kind of medicine to her.  Two
> years ago, we had to give her antibiotics after a dentristry, and I
> swore I would never go through that ordeal again.  It was the most
> miserable 2 weeks of my life, no joke.  She foams at the mouth,
> scratches, bites, squirms, etc., etc.  At this point, I am afraid that
> the force required to restrain her will damage her neck or spinal
> cord.  It truly has to be seen to be believed.  When we brought her in
> to the new vet a couple of days ago, they could barely get a look in
> her mouth even with two people and using leather gloves.  How in the

> The other thing to note is that this cat does not like food enough to
> be able to hide a pill in it.  She will simply refuse to eat.  Nor
> does she like any of the new compounded medicines.  When we tried
> that, she foamed at the mouth as soon as she saw the bottle come out.

> If all of these problems are anxiety-related, aren't we only
> increasing her stress level by putting her throught the hell of
> administering all of these *** that are supposed to be curing the
> condition?

> One final note, the new vet we have gone to has very little compassion
> or bedside manner.  However, she is supposed to be a cat specialist,
> while our current vet is not.  I'm not jazzed about the manner in
> which the new vet relates to her clients and patients, but does that
> matter?  Or should you always strive to find a vet that you can work
> with on a personal level?  I am much more receptive to folks in her
> position saying things like "Ok, let's try this, let's try that...",
> rather than "You have to do XX, you have to do YY...".  Maybe the
> cat's condition justifies that kind of militant regimen, but maybe
> not.  Can anyone shed some light on that?

> Sorry for the long post, but I'm really not sure what to do next.
> Should we jump off the cliff and try all of these things, probably
> driving us and the cat completely crazy?  Or should we get yet another
> opinion on these problems?  I just hate when the cat is in constant
> fear of us and thinks we are only going to hurt her or try to force
> medicine down her throat when we are around.

> Thank you for any help,
> Greg

 
 
 

Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Post by Kare » Sat, 23 Nov 2002 06:03:24


I admit, I would have checked for allergies. However, wet food only is a bit
odd. Usually they recommend switching to z/d first, which is pretty much the
allergy food for cats. It only comes in dry and though very expensive would
be worth the expense if it worked. The protein is broken down so that it can
be consumed without initiating a reaction. You would keep her on this for 8
weeks or so and see if she responds positively. If she did you would
gradually add one ingredient at a time back in til you found the one that
sets her off. The highest offenders are fish, beef and wheat. I have a cat
that has inhalant allergies. I keep vacuuming and I have HEPA filters and
and a HEPA vacuum. Your problem here is she has gone so long, you may not be
able to get it under control. But I think it is certainly a good thing to
try. You might also look at Feliway for the home. It helps calm cats, and
with Grant there is certainly a large amount of anxiety related to his
allergies. Well, if you itched all over, you would be stressed too. As for
meds, have you ever tried wrapping her in a towel? Check out the following
link:

http://www.moonsgarden.com/#fr

Cats *can*  also try antihistimines if it is not food related, but they
require twice a day dosage which doesn't sound conducive here if your cat
has allergies to something other than food. I wish you good luck. I sure
hope she does better soon.

Karen


Quote:
> Hi there,

> I'm sorry, but I need to vent a bit at some of the problems we have
> been having with one of our cats lately.  I'm pretty annoyed with the
> vets who we have been working with and am wondering if I need to see
> yet another one!

> Some history:  We have 2 cats, one M and one F.  Both are about 10
> yrs. old.  The male cat is in generally good health, but has a heart
> murmur and takes medication for it every day (Enalapril?). The female
> cat had a massive anaphylactic (sp?) allergic reaction about 8 years
> ago after her yearly shots were administered.  After 3 days in the
> hospital and coming very close to death, she gradually got back to
> normal.

> About 5 years ago, she started***ing herself very frequently and
> started removing the fur on her front legs and belly.  Since then,
> this problem has been constantly and gradually getting worse and
> worse.  Our vet in our old town and our current vet both believe that
> the problem is stress-related.  About 3 months ago, we started
> administering transdermal Elavil (then Buspar) to her ear every day to
> reduce her stress.  The medicine did not appear to work and she
> started scratching her ears so much that her fur has been removed and
> they are scabbing over.

> At this point, the cat has only a narrow strip of fur along her back
> and some on her legs.  Everywhere else that she can reach, she has
> removed the fur.

> I finally snapped last week and decided to take her to a new vet.  The
> new vet immediately suspected allergies and was quite surprised that
> the other vets did not do any testing in this area.  Here is what she
> has told us to do:

> - Remove all dry food.
> - Only feed wet food from now on that does not contain fish/fish
> derivatives, soy derivatives and preservatives.
> - Apply medicated shampoo (Hexadene?) and cream rinse twice within a
> one week period to eliminate any secondary bacterial or fungal
> infection currently residing on the skin.
> - Change to new cat litter that does not contain clay or any clay
> products.
> - Administer homeopathic anti-anxiety drops 3 times/day.

> Now I also got a call from the new vet this morning and found out that
> the cat has Ascrid roundworms present in her feces and we need to
> administer 2 applications of medicine to treat that.  Of course, that
> will need to be done to both cats.

> At this point, I'm overwhelmed by the number of changes that have to
> be done all at once.  Is all of this really necessary?

> The unfortunate part about doing these things with this cat is the
> level of difficulty of administering any kind of medicine to her.  Two
> years ago, we had to give her antibiotics after a dentristry, and I
> swore I would never go through that ordeal again.  It was the most
> miserable 2 weeks of my life, no joke.  She foams at the mouth,
> scratches, bites, squirms, etc., etc.  At this point, I am afraid that
> the force required to restrain her will damage her neck or spinal
> cord.  It truly has to be seen to be believed.  When we brought her in
> to the new vet a couple of days ago, they could barely get a look in
> her mouth even with two people and using leather gloves.  How in the

> The other thing to note is that this cat does not like food enough to
> be able to hide a pill in it.  She will simply refuse to eat.  Nor
> does she like any of the new compounded medicines.  When we tried
> that, she foamed at the mouth as soon as she saw the bottle come out.

> If all of these problems are anxiety-related, aren't we only
> increasing her stress level by putting her throught the hell of
> administering all of these *** that are supposed to be curing the
> condition?

> One final note, the new vet we have gone to has very little compassion
> or bedside manner.  However, she is supposed to be a cat specialist,
> while our current vet is not.  I'm not jazzed about the manner in
> which the new vet relates to her clients and patients, but does that
> matter?  Or should you always strive to find a vet that you can work
> with on a personal level?  I am much more receptive to folks in her
> position saying things like "Ok, let's try this, let's try that...",
> rather than "You have to do XX, you have to do YY...".  Maybe the
> cat's condition justifies that kind of militant regimen, but maybe
> not.  Can anyone shed some light on that?

> Sorry for the long post, but I'm really not sure what to do next.
> Should we jump off the cliff and try all of these things, probably
> driving us and the cat completely crazy?  Or should we get yet another
> opinion on these problems?  I just hate when the cat is in constant
> fear of us and thinks we are only going to hurt her or try to force
> medicine down her throat when we are around.

> Thank you for any help,
> Greg

 
 
 

Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Post by kael » Sat, 23 Nov 2002 06:34:45


And the fire said to me...on 21 Nov 2002 11:43:43 -0800 in article

said:

Quote:

> At this point, the cat has only a narrow strip of fur along her back
> and some on her legs.  Everywhere else that she can reach, she has
> removed the fur.

Poor kitty!!

Quote:
> I finally snapped last week and decided to take her to a new vet.  The
> new vet immediately suspected allergies and was quite surprised that
> the other vets did not do any testing in this area.  Here is what she
> has told us to do:

I am NOT a vet. I read a lot. The following are all opinions based on
what I think I know.  :)

Quote:
> - Remove all dry food.  
> - Only feed wet food from now on that does not contain fish/fish
> derivatives, soy derivatives and preservatives.
> - Apply medicated shampoo (Hexadene?) and cream rinse twice within a
> one week period to eliminate any secondary bacterial or fungal
> infection currently residing on the skin.
> - Change to new cat litter that does not contain clay or any clay
> products.
> - Administer homeopathic anti-anxiety drops 3 times/day.

> Now I also got a call from the new vet this morning and found out that
> the cat has Ascrid roundworms present in her feces and we need to
> administer 2 applications of medicine to treat that.  Of course, that
> will need to be done to both cats.

> At this point, I'm overwhelmed by the number of changes that have to
> be done all at once.  Is all of this really necessary?

No. In fact, it may stress her out worse. Cats don't like change.
Gradual is always a key unless it is a MAJOR health issue, like severe
allergies that can lead to death. The cat is already stressed. Stressing
her worse won't help.
Wet food is better than dry, but if she won't eat it, it doesn't help
her any. I *would* get a high quality food with no fish, etc, but change
it slowly. Many cats don't take to litter changes well and decide to use
the house instead. Always offer TWO boxes when changing litter - one
with the old litter and one with the new. If she hates the new, at least
she won't soil the house.
I'm not saying not to do the changes - I am saying don't do them all at
once. Gradual.

Quote:
> The unfortunate part about doing these things with this cat is the
> level of difficulty of administering any kind of medicine to her.  

So don't. Have the vet (or tech) administer the worming medicine. A
properly administered pill (or dropper of liquid) takes 2 seconds. The
cat won't hate *you*.
She doesn't need anxiety ***; she needs to live an anxiety-free life.
They overmedicate everything these days, from kids to pets.

Quote:
> Two
> years ago, we had to give her antibiotics after a dentristry, and I
> swore I would never go through that ordeal again.  It was the most
> miserable 2 weeks of my life, no joke.  She foams at the mouth,
> scratches, bites, squirms, etc., etc.  At this point, I am afraid that
> the force required to restrain her will damage her neck or spinal
> cord.  It truly has to be seen to be believed.

Oh, no, trust me. I have one like that. Just got over two weeks of hell
myself for ear mites. Mine, however, is young and despite throwing a
hissy fit about being restrained, does not stay stressed. As soon as I
let her go, she's all purring and stuff again. But to put drops in her
ears was an exercise in ingenuity to not hurt her.

Quote:
> When we brought her in
> to the new vet a couple of days ago, they could barely get a look in
> her mouth even with two people and using leather gloves.  How in the

> The other thing to note is that this cat does not like food enough to
> be able to hide a pill in it.  She will simply refuse to eat.  Nor
> does she like any of the new compounded medicines.  When we tried
> that, she foamed at the mouth as soon as she saw the bottle come out.

As I've said, I'd have the vet do anything necessary - like the worming
medicine - but put off any more *** or baths or anything stressful to
the cat.
If it is an allergy, it won't get worse if you gradually change things,
it will just get better more slowly. And the less stress she has, the
better for her. If it is a stress issue, *** are not the answer.
Lowering her stress is.

Quote:
> If all of these problems are anxiety-related, aren't we only
> increasing her stress level by putting her throught the hell of
> administering all of these *** that are supposed to be curing the
> condition?

In my opinion, absolutely.
A quiet home with lots of lovin' where no one hurt her would be best.
Don't give her any more pills or medicines. Take her to have it done so
that your home is a haven, not some place she is stressed out. Normally,
this is not an issue, but your kitty is already walking around afraid of
more medicine all the time.

Quote:
> One final note, the new vet we have gone to has very little compassion
> or bedside manner.  However, she is supposed to be a cat specialist,
> while our current vet is not.  I'm not jazzed about the manner in
> which the new vet relates to her clients and patients, but does that
> matter?  

In my opinion, YES.

Quote:
> Or should you always strive to find a vet that you can work
> with on a personal level?  I am much more receptive to folks in her
> position saying things like "Ok, let's try this, let's try that...",
> rather than "You have to do XX, you have to do YY...".  Maybe the
> cat's condition justifies that kind of militant regimen, but maybe
> not.  Can anyone shed some light on that?

If she is not a nice person to you or nice to your cat, how can she give
good care? Would you take your child to that doctor if she were a people
doctor? If not, find a new one. Go with your gut. I have excellent vets
who also know how to be more than just civil - they *care*. That is SO
important to me.

Quote:
> Sorry for the long post, but I'm really not sure what to do next.
> Should we jump off the cliff and try all of these things, probably
> driving us and the cat completely crazy?  Or should we get yet another
> opinion on these problems?  I just hate when the cat is in constant
> fear of us and thinks we are only going to hurt her or try to force
> medicine down her throat when we are around.

Give her extra loving and no more bad things from you (even though we
know they are necessary "bad" things, she doesn't) or in your home. It
may take a few weeks for her to calm, especially while she needs to get
worming medicine.
And get a new vet. Get a referral from a friend, if possible.

As an aside, I have heard some remarkable things about classical music.
Don't laugh.  :)
I play classical during the day while I am out. I really think it helps
my *** kids relax. I have heard other people say the same.

Also, consider pet massage. It is a wonderful de-stress thing to do,
helps her regain her trust in you, and helps you both just spend quality
time together. Sounds new-agey (is that a word?), but it is something my
fukids enjoy a lot.

Good luck, and let us know how it turn out.

--

~kaeli~
visit me at http://www.moonsgarden.com/~infinite.possibilities

 
 
 

Difficult excessive licking problem with cat

Post by Sylv » Sun, 24 Nov 2002 07:55:13


Quote:

> Hi Greg ,
>    Sounds like you're having a nightmare time.
> If this were my cat I would stick with the new vet and try to follow her
> instructions as much as possible. You can't really treat pyschological
> problems (if she has any) until you treat the medical ones first .
>   I've copied and pasted bits of another thread from a Uk cat group.

> *It was certainly worth having the test.
> Daisy doesn't have dried food. She has Feline Veterinary "Sensitivity
> Control" Chicken with Rice" Selected Protein Diet" She has to have a
> food with Rice in her diet as they need to have Carbohyrate as part of
> their diet.
> I can give her fresh Chicken and Turkey when we have that which she
> really enjoys.
>  This is the list of foods that they tested Daisy for to see which she
> was allergic for. The Number at the side of each item is Daisy's
> score.

> The allergy test that Daisy had grades the results from 0 and 5.
> The foods with a score of 0 she isn't allergic to and can have.
> And the foods with a score of 1 to 5 is how they mark how much she has
> a reaction to and the higher the number the higher the allergy.

> LIST OF FOODS
> MEAT FISH

> BEEF 4 SALMON 0
> LAMB 3 TUNA 0
> DUCK 0 WHITE FISH (COD, HADDOCK ,COLEY) 1
> CHICKEN 0

> CEREALS

> WHEAT 4
> SOYABEAN 4
> RICE 4
> CORN ( MAIZE ) 3

> OTHER

> WHOLE EGG 0
> COW'S MILK 3
> TURKEY 0
> RABBIT 2  *

>    Changing the diet and litter isn't a problem but bathing is very
> difficult to do . I would check the new diet you chose and if it can be
> given straightaway (diets are usually changed over several days) with the
> vet first .
>      Ask the vet if they can bath and also worm the cat at the surgery ?
> Even if it is expensive it would save you stress and the cat won't hate you.
> If you have to give the pill yourself ,you could try wrapping the cat up
> tightly in a towel and administer the pill with a pill applicator you can
> get from the vet or a pet shop.
>    HTH, Alison



> > Hi there,

> > I'm sorry, but I need to vent a bit at some of the problems we have
> > been having with one of our cats lately.  I'm pretty annoyed with the
> > vets who we have been working with and am wondering if I need to see
> > yet another one!

> > Some history:  We have 2 cats, one M and one F.  Both are about 10
> > yrs. old.  The male cat is in generally good health, but has a heart
> > murmur and takes medication for it every day (Enalapril?). The female
> > cat had a massive anaphylactic (sp?) allergic reaction about 8 years
> > ago after her yearly shots were administered.  After 3 days in the
> > hospital and coming very close to death, she gradually got back to
> > normal.

> > About 5 years ago, she started***ing herself very frequently and
> > started removing the fur on her front legs and belly.  Since then,
> > this problem has been constantly and gradually getting worse and
> > worse.  Our vet in our old town and our current vet both believe that
> > the problem is stress-related.  About 3 months ago, we started
> > administering transdermal Elavil (then Buspar) to her ear every day to
> > reduce her stress.  The medicine did not appear to work and she
> > started scratching her ears so much that her fur has been removed and
> > they are scabbing over.

> > At this point, the cat has only a narrow strip of fur along her back
> > and some on her legs.  Everywhere else that she can reach, she has
> > removed the fur.

> > I finally snapped last week and decided to take her to a new vet.  The
> > new vet immediately suspected allergies and was quite surprised that
> > the other vets did not do any testing in this area.  Here is what she
> > has told us to do:

> > - Remove all dry food.
> > - Only feed wet food from now on that does not contain fish/fish
> > derivatives, soy derivatives and preservatives.
> > - Apply medicated shampoo (Hexadene?) and cream rinse twice within a
> > one week period to eliminate any secondary bacterial or fungal
> > infection currently residing on the skin.
> > - Change to new cat litter that does not contain clay or any clay
> > products.
> > - Administer homeopathic anti-anxiety drops 3 times/day.

> > Now I also got a call from the new vet this morning and found out that
> > the cat has Ascrid roundworms present in her feces and we need to
> > administer 2 applications of medicine to treat that.  Of course, that
> > will need to be done to both cats.

> > At this point, I'm overwhelmed by the number of changes that have to
> > be done all at once.  Is all of this really necessary?

> > The unfortunate part about doing these things with this cat is the
> > level of difficulty of administering any kind of medicine to her.  Two
> > years ago, we had to give her antibiotics after a dentristry, and I
> > swore I would never go through that ordeal again.  It was the most
> > miserable 2 weeks of my life, no joke.  She foams at the mouth,
> > scratches, bites, squirms, etc., etc.  At this point, I am afraid that
> > the force required to restrain her will damage her neck or spinal
> > cord.  It truly has to be seen to be believed.  When we brought her in
> > to the new vet a couple of days ago, they could barely get a look in
> > her mouth even with two people and using leather gloves.  How in the

> > The other thing to note is that this cat does not like food enough to
> > be able to hide a pill in it.  She will simply refuse to eat.  Nor
> > does she like any of the new compounded medicines.  When we tried
> > that, she foamed at the mouth as soon as she saw the bottle come out.

> > If all of these problems are anxiety-related, aren't we only
> > increasing her stress level by putting her throught the hell of
> > administering all of these *** that are supposed to be curing the
> > condition?

> > One final note, the new vet we have gone to has very little compassion
> > or bedside manner.  However, she is supposed to be a cat specialist,
> > while our current vet is not.  I'm not jazzed about the manner in
> > which the new vet relates to her clients and patients, but does that
> > matter?  Or should you always strive to find a vet that you can work
> > with on a personal level?  I am much more receptive to folks in her
> > position saying things like "Ok, let's try this, let's try that...",
> > rather than "You have to do XX, you have to do YY...".  Maybe the
> > cat's condition justifies that kind of militant regimen, but maybe
> > not.  Can anyone shed some light on that?

> > Sorry for the long post, but I'm really not sure what to do next.
> > Should we jump off the cliff and try all of these things, probably
> > driving us and the cat completely crazy?  Or should we get yet another
> > opinion on these problems?  I just hate when the cat is in constant
> > fear of us and thinks we are only going to hurt her or try to force
> > medicine down her throat when we are around.

> > Thank you for any help,
> > Greg

Hi Greg,
Daisy is my cat which Alison was talking about.
As your cat is on medication before making any food changes have a
word with your new vet and see if an Allergy Test to check if it is
the food, or even the medication the she is taking that she could be
allergic to, would help your cat.
At least if you know what they have an allergic reaction to then the
vet could recommend the best thing to feed her on.

I'm cerainly glad that Daisy had the *** Test to see what she was
allergic to.
The result of the test takes about three to four weeks to come back.
Daisy would be constantly***ing where she could reach on her neck
and her back until she wore patches of fur away.
The vet changed her food and she is now having Whaltham Feline Diet -
Sensivity Control "Chicken and Rice.

A Few years ago she had an allergy as well and the vet had to change
her food as that time like your cat she was***ing the lower half of
her tummy and wore the fur away and also down the inside of both of
her legs she was the put on
Hills RD Food by the vet and that did help the problem.
I hope that this might be helpfull and please let me know how your cat
gets on.

 From my experiance with Daisy I would guess that the problem is more
about allergy than stress. Daisy hated going anywhere near her
carrying basket and it was a battle every time she neeeded to go and
see the vet but just by giving her the correct food, which she loves,
a lot of her problems are now under control.

Good Luck

Regards
Sylvia