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Post by Kay Lancast » Fri, 30 May 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>few shots of ivamectrin, and I've been torturing him every
>night to an ear cleaning with cotton balls and mineral oil. He
>hates this. However, I noticed in his right ear there appears to
>be a substantial clot or plug of some kind (looks like dried ***
>perhaps?) that won't budge. Since it doesn't appear to be changing
>I'm inclined to leave it be until he goes to the vet next, but
>I don't really have a clue what it is or if it is a danger to him.

Given all his bits and pieces of problems, I think at least a phone
call to the vet is warranted.  If the plug of whatsit totally
occludes the ear canal, it could be setting him up for a royal
ear infection.

BTW, the best treatment I've found for ear mites is BagBalm, the
stuff in the square green can meant for chapped cow udders, and
now beloved of yuppie gardeners and quilters.  Depending on where
you buy it (farm stores are cheapest, drug stores a little more
expensive, quilt stores outrageous!), it's $3.50-$8 for a 10 oz
can, of which you will use about a tablespoon in most cases.
(the rest can be used for chapped hands, windburn, etc... it's
quite soothing.)

Wipe out the cat's ear with a tissue around your littlest finger,
then put about 1/2-3/4 tsp of BagBalm in each ear.  Rub the ears
a bit to get it distributed down in the ear canal.  You'll get
immediate airplane ears, but probably no other reaction.  Wipe
the ears out again in a few days and repeat.  Probably won't take
more than 2-3 applications to kill all of the earmites.  A single
application works in most cases.

It's basically vaseline + lanolin, so it's a sort of solid equivalent
of mineral oil.  It also has a mild disiinfectant, sometimes useful
for minor skin infections.  I suspect that the reason it works better
than mineral oil, sweet oil, etc., is that the oil is liquid enough
that the ear mites can migrate out of the ear into the fur on the  
cat's head, then back again when the coast is clear.  Bag Balm is
sticky enough to glue them into place, where they die.    


 
 
 

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Post by Jan A. Cord » Fri, 30 May 1997 04:00:00


[snip]

: first of all, he does have ear mites, for which he's gotten a
: few shots of ivamectrin, and I've been torturing him every
: night to an ear cleaning with cotton balls and mineral oil. He
: hates this. However, I noticed in his right ear there appears to
: be a substantial clot or plug of some kind (looks like dried ***
: perhaps?) that won't budge. Since it doesn't appear to be changing
: I'm inclined to leave it be until he goes to the vet next, but
: I don't really have a clue what it is or if it is a danger to him.

[snip]

My cat, Amelia, had a bad case of earmites as a kitten.  Since then
she has had chronic problems with her left ear and periodically has
goop in her ear similar to what you have described.  I have to remember
to check her ear regularly.  When she is having problems the vet prescribes
Gentocin drops.  If it's really bad she prescribes Baytril (which I believe
is an antibiotic).  

There has been at least one occasion where Amelia had no outward signs of a
problem yet had a raging infection in that ear.  We discovered it when she
got her teeth cleaned.  I had asked them to do a check on her ear while she
was in and that's the only reason we found it.

Be sure to mention this problem to your vet.  With luck they'll be able to
clear it up and be done with it.  

Unfortunately, Amelia is 11 years old and we're still having trouble with
her left ear.  The right ear has been perfectly fine since the initial
earmite problem was treated.

Jan
--

..........................................................................
. CAT:  A pigmy lion that loves mice, hates dogs, and patronizes human   .
.       beings.    --Oliver Herford                                      .    
..........................................................................

 
 
 

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Post by Sue Kellehe » Sun, 01 Jun 1997 04:00:00


My cat Jeddah is about four years old.  I've had her for about three and
a half years and just recently, when she crawls up on my lap, she takes
her paws and pushes on me  m (it's almost a kneading motion, she pushes
with the left paw, then the right paw then the left, etc.) for minutes at
a time.  Her eyes are closed when she does this and she purrs louder than
usual.  What does this behavior mean and why all of a sudden did she
start doing it?  The first time she did this was while I was sleeping.
She was pushing on my back.  Ahhhhhhhh...almost a good massage.  :-)

Sue Kelleher
http://www.personal.psu.edu/sek1/

 
 
 

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Post by Serv » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> My cat Jeddah is about four years old.  I've had her for about three and
> a half years and just recently, when she crawls up on my lap, she takes
> her paws and pushes on me  m (it's almost a kneading motion, she pushes
> with the left paw, then the right paw then the left, etc.) for minutes at
> a time.

Your cat is making happy paws! Most people and vets (ok, they are people
too!) interpret this as a sign of happiness and feeling content. When a
cat is still nursing it is how it stimulates its mother to get milk out
of her ***, obviously a happy thing! As grown cats, they frequently
give their owers the same treatment when they love someone. My 4 month
old kitten joins me in bed every night and "kneads" my hair and head
until it falls asleep. Hope this helps! I have also seen my cats do this
in their kitty beds.

Susi

 
 
 

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Post by Pablo and Julie Hidalg » Mon, 02 Jun 1997 04:00:00


This is a totally normal behavior...Mosue does it all the time.  THey
use this kneading motion t stimulate the flow of milk when they nurse
when they are kittens, and I guess they do it to the human who replaced
their mom (in their eyes!)  Mosue does it when he feels especially
cuddly.  I think it makes them feel seciure and loved!

Julie Hidalgo