Nope, we don't like that food anymore

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Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Christina Websel » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 07:28:00




Quote:





>>>> Maybe it's the change of weather but I have a fair amount of food that
>>>> the cats will not eat. I'm going to donate a bunch of it to the local
>>>> rescue people and my cats will just have to eat something else. I
>>>> wonder what perfectly good and expensive food they will snub next.

>>> Try not feeding them for 24/36 hours.  They will love their food again.
>>> I get sick of  hearing"my cat will not eat this or that"
>>> If there is nothing wrong  with your cat (medically, check with your
>>> vet) let them get hungry.
>>> I guarantee they will eat within 48 hours.

>> Not always!  (I had one who was visibly losing weight, but simply refused
>> to eat some perfectly good foods.)

> In the past, I've had two different vets tell me that it is dangerous for
> a cat to go two days without eating.

> Joy

and there they have your guilt.

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Bastett » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 07:56:08




 >>> Not always!  (I had one who was visibly losing weight, but simply refused
 >>> to eat some perfectly good foods.)

 >> In the past, I've had two different vets tell me that it is dangerous for
 >> a cat to go two days without eating.

 > and there they have your guilt.

I have to say that I'm a bit skeptical about the claim that two days of
not eating can cause fatty liver disease in a cat. I've heard so many
stories of cats locked in sheds for days or even weeks, and surviving,
even though there was nothing to eat. What about cats who stow away in
shipping containers? Sometimes they're stuck in there for months. Maybe
there are some rodents or other small animals, so they don't actually
starve to death. But considering the amount of weight these cats usually
lose, there are probably some patches where they might go several days
without food.

Maybe some cats are more susceptible to fatty liver than others, and
going more than a couple of days without food could bring on the
syndrome in them. It certainly doesn't seem to be the case for *all*
cats.

--
Joyce

I've gone running from the devil
At times I've beaten down his path

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Chery » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 13:24:41



Quote:
> Maybe some cats are more susceptible to fatty liver than others, and
> going more than a couple of days without food could bring on the
> syndrome in them. It certainly doesn't seem to be the case for*all*
> cats.

Cats who are already overweight are more prone to hepatic lipidosis, or
fatty liver.

--
CAPSLOCK Preventing Login Since 1980.

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Christina Websel » Wed, 17 Apr 2013 12:00:25



Quote:

> > When Kitty Farmcat lived in the wild, do you think she would have
> > refused
> > any cat food?  No, she lived on mashed potatoes, veggies and gravy which
> > my
> > neighbour gave her and the mousies she could catch.
> > She was a fantastic mouse catcher.  She could catch them by sound.  One
> > day
> > I was cleaning out my chicken huts and I moved a feeder.  Kitty was
> > behind
> > the door when the mice ran from there and she put her  paw under the
> > door
> > and got one immediately.  She did it by sound.
> > Boyfie was her apprentice and he can do this too now.

> That's really impressive!

> --
> Joyce

 I think we worry too much about hepatic lipidosis, both KFC and Boyfie got
hungry in the wild.
Kitty lived for 25 years, most of those years hungry until I got her and
Boyfie was hungry too. They did not die from hepatic lipodosis.
Boyfie was terribly thin by the time I persuaded him to come inside.  He was
so lost and hadn't had a meal for weeks.
Despite that it took ages to encourage him, four months until he would eat
in the house.
Two-three years before I could close my door because he panicked about not
being able to escape.

Now he is fine but it took a long time.
I don't know what happened to him, but if I am swilling out my chicken
drinkers and he is near he seems to expect me to throw the water  on him
rather than on the flower beds and he runs.

What sort of person could have thrown water on such a beautiful kind cat?

I will never know where he came from or what his life was before.  I think
he's happy here.
Own bedroom and does what he wants.   A bit of rat patrol but I get him
inside for when the foxes are about during the night.  He's good about
rushing up trees and he can do it in 2 seconds but I prefer to have him
inside during the night.

I'm sure he met foxes all the time when he was out on rat patrol during dark
hours but now he is 10, nearly 11, I want him in at night.
He often does not agree and that is why I am still up at nearly 4 a.m.
waiting for him to come home.  I will not go to bed until he is back.

ks.

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Divamanq » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 05:01:19


Quote:

> What sort of person could have thrown water on such a beautiful kind cat?

Well, my Melisande ended up with me because some woman was trying to
chase her away with a garden hose!  (She was still a tiny kitten, small
enough to lie on an outstretched hand.)  She followed the boy who
rescued her home on his bike, and since his family already had six cats
and three dogs, he brought her to a meeting of LASFFS (Los Angeles
Science-Fiction, Fantasy Society) hoping to get her adopted.  She was
such a philosophically laid-back little thing, I fell in love at once.
 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Christina Websel » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 06:18:43



Quote:


>> What sort of person could have thrown water on such a beautiful kind cat?

> Well, my Melisande ended up with me because some woman was trying to chase
> her away with a garden hose!  (She was still a tiny kitten, small enough
> to lie on an outstretched hand.)  She followed the boy who rescued her
> home on his bike, and since his family already had six cats and three
> dogs, he brought her to a meeting of LASFFS (Los Angeles Science-Fiction,
> Fantasy Society) hoping to get her adopted.  She was such a
> philosophically laid-back little thing, I fell in love at once.

What a lucky cat Melisande was.

I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
it on him.

He seems to know having water thrown on him.

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Bastett » Sat, 20 Apr 2013 07:32:19


 > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
 > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
 > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
 > it on him.

 > He seems to know having water thrown on him.

His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
with elephants might feel to us.

--
Joyce

Cats are rather delicate creatures and they are subject to a good
many ailments, but I never heard of one who suffered from insomnia.
                                            -- Joseph Wood Krutch

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by dgk » Sat, 20 Apr 2013 21:33:25


On Thu, 18 Apr 2013 22:32:19 +0000 (UTC), Bastette

Quote:


> > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
> > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
> > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
> > it on him.

> > He seems to know having water thrown on him.

>His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
>from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
>carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
>movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
>nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
>heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
>and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
>with elephants might feel to us.

That's very true. Scooter is a real mix of skitish and curious. If
there is a noise or something drops, he bolts halfway out of the room
and then gets curious and comes back to check out what caused the
noise. The reason I named him Scooter was because of the way that he
darts to and fro.

And I do have him eating some foods with his antibiotic in it. It's
tough on me though. They get me up earlier than the usual 6 AM feeding
time because there is no food left overnight so that Scooter will eat
the food with medicine in the morning. But I have to mix it with a
small amount of food, make sure he eats most of that, and then mix in
more food. By the time that's done I'm usually too awake to go back to
sleep.

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Bastett » Sun, 21 Apr 2013 05:40:25


 > On Thu, 18 Apr 2013 22:32:19 +0000 (UTC), Bastette

 >>
 >> > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
 >> > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
 >> > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
 >> > it on him.
 >>
 >> > He seems to know having water thrown on him.
 >>
 >>His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
 >>from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
 >>carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
 >>movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
 >>nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
 >>heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
 >>and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
 >>with elephants might feel to us.

 > That's very true. Scooter is a real mix of skitish and curious. If
 > there is a noise or something drops, he bolts halfway out of the room
 > and then gets curious and comes back to check out what caused the
 > noise. The reason I named him Scooter was because of the way that he
 > darts to and fro.

 > And I do have him eating some foods with his antibiotic in it. It's
 > tough on me though. They get me up earlier than the usual 6 AM feeding
 > time because there is no food left overnight so that Scooter will eat
 > the food with medicine in the morning. But I have to mix it with a
 > small amount of food, make sure he eats most of that, and then mix in
 > more food. By the time that's done I'm usually too awake to go back to
 > sleep.

Could you do it at night instead? Unless you do it in the morning and
evening already.

I have a similar situation with Roxy. I give her a spoonful of Fancy
Feast, lightly microwaved and mixed with 1 capsule of l-lysine. When she
finishes that, then I give her half a can. It's a whole ritual, because
usually I have to doctor up the FF + lysine before she'll clean the whole
plate. She doesn't finish the first time and the food is spread out on
the plate. I have to gather it all together in a mound. If she still
won't eat it, I give about 3 seconds in the microwave. No, she's not at
all spoiled, why do you ask? :)

Meanwhile,***y is in the bedroom, with the door closed, chowing down
on his half-can. When she's done with the medicine portion of her dinner,
I then give her the other half-can and let her eat that for a while
before opening the bedroom door. Then both of them have to check out
what the other one is eating, since naturally, the other cat's food must
be so much better.

--
Joyce

No one should try to hit another's bumper. But bumper bumpage is a part of
life. Yawn and get on with it. Here's the best way I can summarize it: I'd
rather have a beer with someone who doesn't care if his bumper gets a slight
dimple than with someone who cares deeply about this.     -- Gene Weingarten

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Christina Websel » Sun, 21 Apr 2013 09:11:35



Quote:

> > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't
> > where
> > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing
> > dirty
> > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might
> > throw
> > it on him.

> > He seems to know having water thrown on him.

> His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
> from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
> carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
> movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
> nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
> heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
> and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
> with elephants might feel to us.

He has had water thrown on him before.  Guaranteed.
Otherwise he would not panic when I throw the chickens water away near him
when he is *helping*with the chickens.
He likes to accompany me every day to feed the chickens  and then go out at
night in case there is a rat under the hut.

He is very clear about the size of rats he will tackle.  Little ones and
half size, the big ones are up to the terriers.
When the terriers come I have to keep Boyfriend inside the house or he'd go
the way of the rats.  They kill everything in their path.  They are killing
machines.
One of them killed a puppy.
would I let them near a child? No.
Would I want them here to kill rats?  Absolutely.
They do not care one jot if one of the big rats with the brown chisel teeth
bite off half their nose.  Happened here but the terrier carried on
regardless and the rat met its maker.
I insisted on antiseptic for the terrier but the terrier men smiled, but
allowed it.
TBH the terrier didn't even notice her nose was*** off as she was well
fired up.
For me, that's not an excuse although some terriers seem impervious to pain
when they are hunting.

;houh

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by Chery » Mon, 22 Apr 2013 12:03:07



Quote:

>   > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
>   > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
>   > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
>   > it on him.

>   > He seems to know having water thrown on him.

> His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
> from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
> carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
> movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
> nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
> heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
> and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
> with elephants might feel to us.

To go further about your speculation, I tend to agree.  Rhett is even
afraid when I'm walking across the room carrying a plate of food for me.
  Not sure he'd think I was going to throw it on him.

--
CAPSLOCKPreventing Login Since 1980.

 
 
 

Nope, we don't like that food anymore

Post by dgk » Tue, 23 Apr 2013 22:26:15


On Fri, 19 Apr 2013 20:40:25 +0000 (UTC), Bastette

Quote:


> > On Thu, 18 Apr 2013 22:32:19 +0000 (UTC), Bastette


> >> > I don't know why Boyfie thinks I would throw water on him, but I don't where
> >> > he came from, what happened to him so maybe when he sees me throwing dirty
> >> > water from my chicken drinkers into my flower beds he thinks I might throw
> >> > it on him.

> >> > He seems to know having water thrown on him.

> >>His nervousness might not be about water. In fact, it might not even be
> >>from bad experiences in his past. Most cats I've had get very wary if I'm
> >>carrying something large or throwing something large. Big objects and big
> >>movements make them nervous. And the more skittish the cat, the more
> >>nervous it makes them. Makes sense to me. We're much taller and far
> >>heavier than they are. We can carry, move and throw things that are bigger
> >>and heavier then they are. It must feel similar to how living in a house
> >>with elephants might feel to us.

> > That's very true. Scooter is a real mix of skitish and curious. If
> > there is a noise or something drops, he bolts halfway out of the room
> > and then gets curious and comes back to check out what caused the
> > noise. The reason I named him Scooter was because of the way that he
> > darts to and fro.

> > And I do have him eating some foods with his antibiotic in it. It's
> > tough on me though. They get me up earlier than the usual 6 AM feeding
> > time because there is no food left overnight so that Scooter will eat
> > the food with medicine in the morning. But I have to mix it with a
> > small amount of food, make sure he eats most of that, and then mix in
> > more food. By the time that's done I'm usually too awake to go back to
> > sleep.

>Could you do it at night instead? Unless you do it in the morning and
>evening already.

Yup, morning and night.